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Job Growth In Swing States Isn't As Bad As Presidential Candidates Say
If you've been listening to the candidates speak about jobs during the run up to the 2016 presidential election, you might be convinced that the sky is falling. Fastcompany.com
Submitted 8 minutes ago

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Look for a change in jobs and scenery? Try Florida
QUESTION: My friend got fired and she is afraid nobody will hire her. She has always lived in (same city) where we grew-up. She likes Florida and our economy is better. How do I convince her to move here? The money she was saving for a rainy day won’t last forever. Gillespie: Moving to Florida may be the perfect solution for your friend. Whenever I have been at the airport, I have seen plenty of smiles on the faces of folks arriving. When they are leaving the “Sunshine State” are they smiling? Florida Today
Submitted 13 minutes ago

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Where is economic growth going to come from?
It's been a frustrating period for economic growth in America. The economy has expanded at an average annual rate of just 2.1 percent since 2010, compared to more than 3 percent in the 1980s and '90s. In the second quarter of the year, the economic growth rate barely topped 1 percent. That's bad for working families, who see more job opportunities and better wages when the economy is growing faster. Houston Chronicle
Submitted 1 hour ago

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Opinion: Robots in the workplace will improve Americans’ quality of life
The steady stream of improvements in driverless cars has convinced me that, before too long, the roads will be filled with cars and trucks operating without humans at the wheel. Likewise, I am convinced that the revolution in artificial intelligence will enable computers and robots to do many of the tasks that white-collar workers now do. It’s not surprising, therefore, that many people are worried about the fate of those whose jobs are vulnerable — or have already been lost — to the latest disruptive technology. What will happen to the millions of men and women who now drive trucks and taxis when the trucks and taxis can drive themselves? What will happen to the accountants and health workers when computers can do their jobs? Marketwatch.com
Submitted 1 hour ago

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Mexico is not just “taking jobs” from the US. It’s also adding them
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump repeatedly lamented the loss of jobs to Mexico during his facedown with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton on Sept. 26. Putting aside the fact that some of his claims were untrue—the social media folks at Ford had to jump in on Twitter mid-debate to deny Trump’s claim that the car company is leaving the US—his views offer an extremely one-sided view of the relationship Mexico and the US have built under the North American Free Trade Agreement, particularly when it comes to jobs. He didn’t mention, for example, that as a partner under NAFTA, Mexico is also supporting employment in the US. QZ.com
Submitted 1 hour ago

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What Americans Actually Think About Trade Agreements
There has been a lot of heated debate in the news media and the election campaigns about international trade. In the first presidential debate, candidate Donald Trump relentlessly flogged the issue, declaring that trade had hollowed out American industry. On the left, antitrade sentiment continues to simmer, much of it focused on opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Meanwhile, the economics field is still dealing with the fallout from a recent paper by some top economists showing that trade with China in the 2000s hurt U.S. workers more than it helped. Agweb.com
Submitted 1 hour ago

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More Wealth, More Jobs, but Not for Everyone: What Fuels the Backlash on Trade
For generations, libraries full of economics textbooks have rightly promised that global trade expands national wealth by lowering the price of goods, lifting wages and amplifying growth. The powers that emerged victorious from World War II championed globalization as the antidote to future conflicts. From Asia to Europe to North America, governments of every ideological persuasion have focused on trade as their guiding economic force. But trade comes with no assurances that the spoils will be shared equitably. Across much of the industrialized world, an outsize share of the winnings have been harvested by people with advanced degrees, stock options and the need for accountants. Ordinary laborers have borne the costs, suffering joblessness and deepening economic anxiety. New York Times
Submitted 1 hour ago

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Millions in U.S. Climb Out of Poverty, at Long Last
Not that long ago, Alex Caicedo was stuck working a series of odd jobs and watching his 1984 Chevy Nova cough its last breaths. He could make $21 an hour at the Johnny Rockets food stand at FedEx Field when the Washington Redskins were playing, but the work was spotty. New York Times
Submitted 2 hours ago

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The Deepwater Horizon spill may have caused ‘irreversible’ damage to Gulf Coast marshes
The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill has been called one of the worst environmental disasters in American history — and more than six years later, scientists are still investigating how much damage it actually caused. Now, a new study suggests the spill may have permanently marred one of the Gulf shore’s most important ecosystems. The study, published Tuesday in the journal Scientific Reports, finds the oil spill caused widespread erosion in the salt marshes along the coasts of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi. And the researchers say there’s a chance these marshes might never completely grow back. Washington Post
Submitted 2 hours ago

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Austin wins award for improving access to solar energy
AUSTIN — The city of Austin is receiving a gold designation from the U.S. Department of Energy for making it easier for businesses and residents to get solar energy. Kxan.com
Submitted 2 hours ago

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Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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