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Large manufacturer eyes Berkeley County, S.C. site for up to 4,000 jobs
A large manufacturing facility that would employ up to 4,000 people over the next decade is being proposed for a 2,800-acre parcel in the Camp Hall Commerce Park in Ridgeville, according to an application for an environmental permit. The permit — filed by Berkeley County on Thursday with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Charleston — does not name the manufacturer, but states that it is an “advanced manufacturing and assembly facility” that will require the same type of transportation, distribution and logistics network as the automotive and aerospace industries. It is not clear whether the project is the Volvo automobile manufacturing plant that South Carolina and other states have been trying to lure in recent months. The manufacturer is identified as “Project Soter” on the permit application. Soter is the spirit of safety in Greek mythology. Volvo cars have long been marketed for having a reputation for safety. Post and Courier
Submitted yesterday

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Machinists cancel union vote at Boeing S.C.
COLUMBIA, SC -- The International Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers Friday withdrew for at least six months their petition for an election scheduled for Wednesday to unionize Boeing Co.’s North Charleston plant. The union cited a “toxic environment and gross violation of workers’s lawful organizing rights.” If the union had pressed ahead with the controversial vote – being waged in a deeply anti-union state – and failed to win, organizers would have had to wait at least a year to schedule another try at passage. The State
Submitted yesterday

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After billions spent, Lockheed's F-35 fighter jet made in Fort Worth 'has to come through'
What happens after the priciest defense program ever, the F-35, takes a mulligan? Hard questions have to be answered, and they came rapid-fire last week, even for the Air Force officer. What’s the fix, when will it happen, what’s the cost, who’s accountable? “I’m sorry to be all up in your tailpipe on this, but it’s at the point where members of Congress are really concerned,” Rep. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., said to Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan at a House hearing. Dallas Morning News
Submitted yesterday

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Report: Billionaire Tony Ressler, Grant Hill bid on Atlanta Hawks
Ares Management LP’s co-founder Tony Ressler is leading a group that dropped a bid to buy the National Basketball Association’s Atlanta Hawks, Bloomberg reported citing three people familiar with the matter. The report said the billionaire’s group includes former NBA All-Star Grant Hill, who dropped out of the bidding process as group leader alongside former NBA player and Wendy’s franchisee Junior Bridgeman. The Hawks will not comment on the sale process until it’s complete. Atlanta Business Chronicle
Submitted yesterday

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Study: Austin could support NFL, NBA, NHL or MLS franchises
Austin is ripe ground for a variety of professional sports franchises, according to a new study that looked at the expansion prospects for the four traditional major U.S. sports plus professional soccer. The study from American City Business Journals, parent company of the Austin Business Journal, found that Austin has the total personal income (TPI) to support professional football, basketball, hockey and soccer. With no major-league professional team currently located here and the San Antonio Spurs as the nearest pro franchise, Austin is seen as one of the most attractive markets in the country for expansion. Austin Business Journal
Submitted yesterday

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Texas businesses band together against LGBT discrimination
Texas' business community took another stand against discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people Tuesday when they announced a new initiative to oppose so-called religious freedom measures that have been filed at the statehouse. Dubbed Texas Competes, the initiative includes some of Texas' biggest companies such as Southwest Airlines Inc. and Dell Inc. and a number of Chambers of Commerce chapters from around the state. The more-than 100 companies and business organizations taking part in the initiative have pledged to support equal rights for the LGBT community. Austin Business Journal
Submitted yesterday

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Nashville’s tight office market fuels earlier listings, pursuit by tenants
In helping a company find space, broker Terry W. Smith stumbled upon a listing of two floors with up to 60,000 square feet at an office building in Cool Springs. But it won’t be available for 2 1/2 years. Turns out, that building’s leasing agent is proactively marketing that space within a lengthy time frame normally reserved for new buildings. Typically, such listings consist of immediately available space, including for sublease. The Tennessean
Submitted yesterday

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‘Job 1′ marks GLE Coupé launch at Mercedes Alabama plant
TUSCALOOSA, Alabama – Workers at Mercedes-Benz’s sprawling Alabama assembly plant celebrated “Job 1” today, signaling the start of mass production of the all-new GLE Coupé at the $4.5 billion facility. Mercedes has called 2015 “The Year of the SUV” for the brand, with the launch of the GLE Coupé and a renewal of most of its SUV line-up, including a new look and new name for the pioneering M-Class, its first Alabama-made model. “For more than 20 years, we have been successfully building sport utility vehicles in Alabama for the world market,” said Jason Hoff, president and CEO of Mercedes-Benz U.S. International in Tuscaloosa. Alabama Department of Commerce
Submitted yesterday

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Three Rivers’ Kelley saluted for work
If it was up to Randy Kelley, he would have borrowed a pocket knife and whittled the first-ever Red Rasberry Humanitarian Award into 450 pieces, one for every person present Tuesday night. “No one individual accomplishes anything by themselves,” said the executive director of Three Rivers Planning and Development District, who was lauded Tuesday night at a Regional Rehabilitation Center event. “Three Rivers is about partnerships. Anything I’ve accomplished is as part of a big group.” His friends and colleagues said Tuesday night that he has been a guiding force in some of north Mississippi’s biggest accomplishments. Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal
Submitted yesterday

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Florida's crop of new craft distilleries stands ready to sell more liquor
Feeling thirsty? It's looking as if Florida drinkers may have something to celebrate when a measure moving through the Legislature loosens purchase restrictions at craft breweries. But it's not just about beer. If the legislation passes, it will also help a growing number of Florida micro-distilleries, a new class of independent liquor makers popping up from St. Petersburg to Dunedin and beyond. Tampa Bay Times
Submitted yesterday

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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