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New drone testing sites could boost oil industry use
HOUSTON — A Federal Aviation Administration decision to permit testing of drones in Texas and at sites throughout the country will open the door to more use of unmanned aircraft by oil companies. Fuel Fix
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Finally, the U.S. economy may be starting to hum
WASHINGTON — For the first time since 2007, the U.S. economy is poised to start the new year on a strong footing amid a flurry of signs that point to a firming recovery. From sales of cars and homes to hiring and the booming stock market, there are reasons to finally believe that the coming year will be markedly better than the last, and that a fits-and-starts-recovery will hit its stride. Sun Herald
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Creating and Destroying “Good Jobs”
One of the most common refrains in discussions of public economic policy is the importance not only of creating “jobs” but of creating “good jobs,” usually meaning jobs with pay levels, benefits, and security that can support a middle class life style. For several decades following the end of the Great Depression and the Second World War, this usually meant, for blue collar workers, a unionized manufacturing job within one of the nation’s large corporations. For white collar workers and professionals, it also often meant a job within one of these large national corporations or within a government agency. mtpr.org
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Congress Letting 55 Tax Breaks Expire At Year's End
WASHINGTON (AP) — In an almost annual ritual, Congress is letting a package of 55 popular tax breaks expire at the end of the year, creating uncertainty — once again — for millions of individuals and businesses. Huffington Post
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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The “middle class” myth: Here’s why wages are really so low today
Let me tell you the story of an “unskilled” worker in America who lived better than most of today’s college graduates. In the winter of 1965, Rob Stanley graduated from Chicago Vocational High School, on the city’s Far South Side. Pay rent, his father told him, or get out of the house. So Stanley walked over to Interlake Steel, where he was immediately hired to shovel taconite into the blast furnace on the midnight shift. It was the crummiest job in the mill, mindless grunt work, but it paid $2.32 an hour — enough for an apartment and a car. That was enough for Stanley, whose main ambition was playing football with the local sandlot all-stars, the Bonivirs. Salon
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Nuclear energy fights wind, natural gas to reach market
Clean energy sources like wind and nuclear are fighting each other to replace sources of electricity that are heavy carbon emitters. Both wind and nuclear energy are being squeezed by natural gas production, which offers a slightly cleaner alternative to coal. Still, natural gas leaves a carbon footprint three times as large as the nation's goal to cut emissions. The Hil
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Harold Simmons' Texas-Sized Plan for Nuclear Waste
The nuclear crisis in Japan has provided a vivid reminder that one of the biggest conundrums of atomic power is what do do with all of the resulting radioactive waste. Harold Simmons believes he's found an answer. The Texas billionaire and corporate raider is opening a nuclear waste dump in West Texas, despite objections from environmentalists and the state's own experts. One of the Lone Star State's largest donors to Republican causes, Simmons expects his that privately-owned site will become the nation's most sought after radioactive waste repository. Mother Jones
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Florida minimum wage to rise slightly
As the idea of raising the federal minimum wage continues to be a hot topic nationally, Florida minimum wage earners will see a slight increase after the first of the year. Tampa Bay Business Journal
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Manufacturing in Texas rises for 8th straight month, Dallas Fed says
Manufacturing activity in Texas factories increased for the eighth straight month in December, but at a slower pace than in November. Austin Business Journal
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

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Home Prices in 20 U.S. Cities Climb by Most in Seven Years
Home prices in 20 U.S. cities rose in October from a year ago by the most in more than seven years, signaling the real-estate rebound will keep bolstering household wealth in 2014. Bloomberg
Submitted 3 years 23 days ago

 

 

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Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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