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Made in NC: Asheville becomes hub of state’s growing craft beer industry
ASHEVILLE, NC-- Inside unadorned buildings, dark basements and hollow warehouses across this mountain town, the steam rises from shiny pots carrying a sweet smell from a brew that draws thousands. Not far removed from the copper stills that once kept moonshine flowing in these hills, this new legal brew is transforming the state into a top destination for a fast-growing segment of the beverage market: craft beer. Charlotte Observer
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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Small businesses lament end of NC tax deduction
Like many Charlotte-area small business owners, Doug Jones doesn’t know how to digest the N.C. General Assembly’s recent tax policy overhaul. Even before he and his wife, Sophie, opened Pour Olive, a specialty oil and vinegar shop on East Boulevard, he believed the state’s tax code needed revisions that would make the state more attractive to corporations. Charlotte Observer
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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About those N.C. jobs...
After the 2013 session ended, state Sen. Neal Hunt sent his constituents a list of what he considers the accomplishments of the Republican-led legislature. One “to-do” item checked off by the Raleigh Republican was typical of the GOP’s claims: “You expected us to create a competitive business climate to lower our unemployment rate and to put our citizens back into high-quality jobs; tax reform and regulatory reform will accomplish this.” Yet the problem isn’t going away, and the Republican solution seems to be making it worse. North Carolina’s unemployment rate ticked upward in July, putting the state in a tie with Rhode Island for the third-highest level of joblessness at 8.9 percent. Even as the state tries to spur private-sector hiring, it’s increasing unemployment – and cutting demand for goods and services – by squeezing the public sector with tax cuts that lead to budget cuts that lead to job cuts. Employers added 8,200 jobs last month, but that gain was offset by a loss of 5,300 public-sector jobs. Charlotte Observer
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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Weak U.S. durable goods data dims growth outlook
Orders for long-lasting U.S. manufactured goods recorded their biggest drop in nearly a year in July and a gauge of planned business spending on capital goods also tumbled, casting a shadow over the economy early in the third quarter. The report on Monday added to other data for July on industrial production, housing starts and new home sales that have suggested economic growth this quarter will probably not accelerate as much as economists had hoped. The Fiscal Times
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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Analysis: Floridan Aquifer can only handle 6% more pumping before serious environmental harm
Just how much more water can Central Florida pump from the Floridan Aquifer without causing real harm to the region's environment? After years of debate, study and anxiety, state authorities say they have finally — and officially — figured it out. The answer: hardly any. Orlando Sentinel
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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Poof! Your Job Is Now Freelance, Part-time, No Benefits
Watch closely: I’m about to demystify the sleight-of-hand by which good jobs were transformed into bad jobs, full-time workers with benefits into freelancers with nothing, during the dark days of the Great Recession. Alternet
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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Who Are the Long-Term Unemployed?
It's been over four years since the recovery officially began, but there are still over four million people who are long-term unemployed. That's four million people who can't find work even after looking for six months or more -- four million people who can't even get companies to look at their resumes anymore. The Atlantic
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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Barge Operators Struggle Along the Mississippi
Mississippi River barge operators and their customers had been hoping business would get back to normal this year after two years of extreme weather that wreaked havoc on the river's bustling freight traffic. Wall Street Journal
Submitted 3 years 34 days ago

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South Florida emerging as a leading flight-training location
Call it Florida’s “Sim City.” Clustered along Northwest 36th Street in the area along Miami International Airport’s northern border are the companies and schools that house most of South Florida’s 62 FAA-approved airline flight simulators. Private and commercial pilots, and many aviation professionals, learn and hone their craft on the devices, which re-create the experience of aircraft flight. Only Atlanta, with 64, and the Dallas-Fort Worth area, with 122, currently have more. Miami Herald
Submitted 3 years 35 days ago

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Here Are The Key Economic Events To Watch This Week As September 18 Nears
At this point, the market economists expect the Federal Reserve to announce on September 18 that it will begin tapering its monthly $85 billion purchases of mortgage and Treasury bonds. Business Insider
Submitted 3 years 35 days ago

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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