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AL taxpayers to continue investing at Brookley Aeroplex ahead of Airbus opening
MOBILE, Alabama – The cost of asphalt to pave over newly constructed roads, conduit for fiber optics, lights, trees and flowers might not be the most talked about things during today's groundbreaking for Airbus, but it could affect the typical Mobile taxpayer the most.
Submitted 3 years 24 days ago

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Economic Impact: Two key trends are about to converge on the Virginia economy
Looking back over my years of forecasting, it’s clear that macroeconomic shifts that impact the national economy for lengthy periods lead to winners and losers among the states. Computers and information technology, for example, have driven national productivity higher in recent decades. The economies of the Silicon Valley and Northern Virginia benefited greatly. Richmond Times-Dispatch
Submitted 3 years 24 days ago

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Top Senate Republican ‘Optimistic’ About Obama’s Budget: ‘He’s Showing Leadership’
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) expressed optimism about President Obama’s budget, scheduled to be released on Wednesday, saying it could lead to a grand compromise between both parties and force the GOP to meet Democrats in the middle. Think Progress
Submitted 3 years 25 days ago

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Bubba Watson's Hovercraft Golf Cart


Submitted 3 years 27 days ago

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Natural gas driving industrial development
The significant growth in Louisiana’s petrochemical and chemical industry is being driven by the ample supply of cheap natural gas in the Haynesville Shale in northwest Louisiana, an official with Chesapeake Energy said Thursday. Kevin McCotter, a vice president of corporate development for Chesapeake who is based in Shreveport, said the Haynesville Shale contains 250 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. One cubic foot of natural gas is about the size of a basketball and provides enough energy to keep a hot water heater running for about an hour and 15 minutes. “That’s one of the benefits of Haynesville, 250 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, 250 miles straight down a pipeline to the Gulf Coast,” said McCotter, who was one of the speakers at a BIC Alliance State of the Industry seminar held at Ashley Manor. The Advocate
Submitted 3 years 27 days ago

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A Stubborn Drought Tests Texas Cattle Ranchers
BLOOMING GROVE, Tex. — Gary Price is a rarity among cattle ranchers these days. He’s making money on his herd of 200 cows in this tiny town about an hour south of Dallas-Fort Worth. “The market is very good, and we’ve been able to keep what we’ve needed to buy, feed and such, to a minimum,” Mr. Price said, as he strolled in a pasture on his 77 Ranch, which is planted in native grasses, stands of mesquite and a fair number of what most people would call weeds. “That’s benefited us during this drought that has pushed prices higher.” More typical are Don and Marilyn Smith, proprietors of the Starridge Land and Cattle Company about 100 miles northeast in Sulphur Springs. Mr. Smith has hung in, paring just 10 to 15 percent of his herd over the three years that drought has severely damaged this state, but it has not been easy. The New York Times
Submitted 3 years 27 days ago

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Volkswagen's Chattanooga factory at center of labor fray
A national right to work group has joined the fray over whether Volkswagen's Chattanooga plant should set up a works council labor board and give the United Auto Workers a foothold. The National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation has reached out to VW workers on Facebook, offering free legal aid if they're feeling pressured to join the UAW. "What we see in Chattanooga is a little bit concerning," said Mark Mix, the Springfield, Va.-based group's president. The union declined to comment, citing UAW's President Bob King's earlier statement that the organization is "very interested in, and has great respect for, the German system of co-determination where the company has strong collaboration with management, unions and works councils." Chattanooga Times Free Press
Submitted 3 years 27 days ago

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The times, and the Mobile region, are changing with Airbus
As we approach Monday’s big ground-breaking ceremony for Airbus’ first assembly plant on U.S. soil, the air is full of grand predictions about thousands of jobs, a global profile for Mobile and the transformation of an entire region. But the truth is, hyperbole aside, it’s impossible to fully gauge the long-range impact of the Airbus plant on the central Gulf Coast. Who, for example, can accurately forecast the economy over the next 10, 20 or even 30 years? (Did any of us imagine a decade ago that today we’d be recovering from a worldwide recession?) And who can say how well local and state politicians will respond to a heightened demand for services – whether in the form of more schools, better roads, increased police protection or quality-of-life amenities? al.com
Submitted 3 years 27 days ago

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Florida's solar energy really sizzles in April
Nothing brings a surge of solar energy in Florida like the mild, sunny days of April. Hundreds of thousands of solar panels in Jacksonville, Gainesville, Orlando, Kennedy Space Center, Lakeland and Arcadia typically produce more watts of energy this month than any other. And every year — though not without setbacks — the state's combined solar output increases. Those Florida utilities most involved in solar will generate enough electricity this April for 12,000 homes. Just five years ago, that was regarded as an enormous amount of alternative energy for Florida. Before long, it may rank as a blip in the record books. Orlando Sentinel
Submitted 3 years 27 days ago

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Kentucky coal production, employment plummet
Coal production in Kentucky last year reached its lowest level since 1965, while shedding more than 4,000 jobs, nearly all of them in Appalachian counties, according to a new state report. Eastern Kentucky coalfields took the largest hit, with production dropping 27.6 percent — extending what state officials fear may be a long-term trend. Officials blame the drop on competition from natural gas and increased mining costs, along with Washington’s tougher mining rules. “This is a reality check, particularly in the Eastern Kentucky coalfields,” said Dick Brown, spokesman for the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet, which produced the report. “The trend has been downward for some time.” New tracking numbers from the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet made public Wednesday show employment at Eastern Kentucky mines fell 29.9 percent last year from the year before, from 13,608 in December 2011 to 9,540 in December 2012 — a decline of 4,068 jobs. Louisville Courier-Journal
Submitted 3 years 27 days ago

 

 

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
According to Chinese theory, yin is a passive, negative force and yang is an active, positive force. Chinese philosophers believe that the opposing forces aren't really contradictory. Instead, they are interconnected and complimentary, interacting to create a balance in one's life. 
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
The Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT report was released in the summer quarter. I try to read it every time it comes out since I find it to be the best indicator of child poverty, a statistic everyone involved in economic development needs to be aware of. The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a charity that supports disadvantaged children. 
 


 

 

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