Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
-3
Likes

US manufacturing sector growth slows in August: ISM
The pace of growth in the U.S. manufacturing sector slowed in August to its weakest in over two years, according to an industry report, while construction spending in July climbed to its highest level in more than seven years. (Tweet this) CNBC
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Two Alabama rib joints make list of 35 Best Ribs in America
Two of America's best rib spots come from Alabama, according to the Daily Meal, which recently released its 35 Best Ribs in America for 2015. Decatur's Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-Q ranked 5th on the list, while Archibald's Bar B.Q. of Northport is 25th. Birmingham Business Journal
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Proof home ownership costs more than renting
In most areas of the country, homeownership costs more than renting. Many economists with calculators claim the opposite, but the calculations and conclusions are often highly misleading. As is often the case, the devil is in the details. Business Insider
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Americans smuggle cigarettes like crazy
There are some pretty big underground cigarette markets in the U.S. Smuggled cigarettes make up substantial portions of cigarette consumption in many states, and greater than 20% of consumption in 15 states, according to the Tax Foundation. Business Insider
Submitted yesterday

16
Likes

AAA: U.S. gas prices plummeting
Bearish trends for crude oil prices and the resolution to problems at a major U.S. refinery pushed gas prices lower at a hastened clip, motor club AAA said. AAA reported a national average retail price for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline for Tuesday at $2.46, down about eight tenths of a percent from the previous day and 5 percent less than the previous week. UPI
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Oil Sees Biggest Price Surge in 25 Years, but the Slump May Not Be Over Yet
Oil futures soared on Monday for a third consecutive day, rising more than 8 percent, as a downward revision of U.S. crude production data and OPEC's readiness to talk with other producers helped extend the biggest price surge in 25 years. U.S. crude oil prices have skyrocketed more than $10 a barrel in three days, erasing the month's declines as a series of relatively small-scale supply disruptions and output risks prompted bearish traders to take profits on short positions, which had been at near record highs a week ago. The Fiscal Times
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

GE Oil & Gas to cut more Texas jobs
GE Oil & Gas told the Texas Workforce Commission it plans to cut even more jobs at a facility in Lufkin, Texas. From Sept. 10 through Sept. 30, the company will cut 176 of approximately 187 manufacturing, sales/services, human resources, sourcing, materials, finance, administrative, engineering and other employees at 300 Winston St., known as the Foundry. Houston Business Journal
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Here's the real reason you don't make enough money
As Labor Day approaches, we are likely to hear from a growing chorus of political, religious, academic, labor and business leaders who agree “America needs a raise” to reverse three decades of wage stagnation and rising income inequality. Fortune
Submitted yesterday

-5
Likes

Why Walmart is raising wages -- and cutting hours
Less than three months after announcing plans to raises the wages of 100,000 workers, Walmart (WMT) is scaling back the hours of some employees as it tries to rein in costs. According to the retailer, which is also the largest U.S. private sector employer, the move affects a "small number of stores" that were "significantly" overscheduling workers. The company didn't provide more specific information but stressed that the cuts wouldn't hurt its efforts to improve customer service, which has long been a weakness. CBS News
Submitted yesterday

-5
Likes

The Growing Skills Gap in Manufacturing
“The problem to the greater economy is that manufacturers are a really important factor in economic growth. So if you have a restricted manufacturing sector because of the skills gap, then you probably have restricted economic growth overall. Manufacturing jobs pay better than your average service jobs, especially for that skill level. So you’re going to have less purchasing power, and less movement into the upper and middle class if you don’t have people fulfilling high five-figure jobs in manufacturing.” Qualitymag.com
Submitted yesterday

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 5922
 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

http://www.developunion.com/
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2015 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login