Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
11
Likes

The Suddenly Hot Job Market for Workers Over 50
Things are finally looking up for older workers. The latest data show the unemployment rate for those over age 55 stands at just 4.1%, compared with 5.7% for the total population and a steep 18.8% for teens. The ranks of the long-term unemployed, which ballooned during the recession as mature workers lost their jobs, are coming down. Age-discrimination charges have fallen for six consecutive years. And now, as the job market lurches back to life, more companies are wooing the silver set with formal retraining programs. TIME
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Small businesses are basically saving the job market right now
They accounted for 81% of new private-sector jobs in January alone There’s been a surge in post-recession small business hiring across the country, according to a new report from ADP Research Institute. Fortune
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Mitch McConnell’s Love Affair with Hemp
Last May, a shipment of 250 pounds of hemp seeds left Italy destined for Kentucky as part of a pilot project made legal by the 2014 federal farm bill. Kentucky farmers had long hoped for a crop that could fill the void left by the decline of tobacco, and many thought that industrial hemp, which is used in a vast array of products, could be that crop. Politico
Submitted yesterday

-4
Likes

Why gas prices are on the rise
It seems the flirtation with below-$2-a-gallon gasoline has ended. Pump prices have steadily risen the past few weeks, and it's now up to $2.45 in some places. That's leaving many consumers frustrated, particularly because crude oil prices are less than $50-a-barrel. Floridatoday.com
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

Chicken feet to Asia. Leg quarters to Cuba. How Alabama's $15 billion poultry industry feeds the world.
Stacked onto pallets, stored in containers, and frozen at bone-chilling temperatures, Alabama's chickens feed the world. Every year, more than 200,000 tons of poultry is exported out of Alabama's state docks in Mobile. It is sent to Hong Kong, Romania, Estonia and Latvia. Alabama chicken makes it way to countries across Latin America, Central America, and the Middle East. AL.com
Submitted yesterday

-11
Likes

There's A Startling North-South Divide When It Comes To Health Care
The good news is the uninsured rate in the U.S. has fallen to a record low. The bad news is the benefits of health care reform aren't reaching a large swath of the country. Over the last year, the uninsured rate in the U.S. fell 3.5 percentage points, from 17.3 percent in 2013 to 13.8 percent in 2014, according to the latest data from Gallup. That's the lowest yearly rate that's been recorded by Gallup's Well-Being Index. According to Gallup, much of the decline can be linked to President Obama's health care reform law, which implemented a number of new policies to help Americans afford health insurance. But some states' refusal to adapt Obamacare's key provisions are causing a startling gap in uninsured rates across the country. The states with the highest uninsured rates in 2014 are pretty much all found in the South, the Gallup poll found. Huffington Post
Submitted yesterday

17
Likes

Toyota employees: Enjoy the windfall, within reason
Toyota to Texas: Here’s a little advice on local economics, and not just for newcomers from Toyota: Think small, at least smaller than you can afford. The Texas windfall is real, but go too large and it can evaporate. In the last two decades, Texas has had a net gain of almost half a million people from California, far more than from any other state. Several thousand more are expected to follow as Toyota relocates its North American headquarters from Torrance to Plano. Jobs are usually the No. 1 lure, but Texas has a big edge in living costs, too. Home prices are much lower than in California, and there’s no state income tax. Those two generate significant savings, especially to well-paid workers. Dallas Morning News
Submitted yesterday

21
Likes

Toyota will ask workers about moving to Texas
Toyota to Texas: As site work begins on Toyota’s new campus in Plano, the company will start determining this month how many of its 4,000 employees intend to work there. Toyota, the world’s largest automaker, announced last spring that it will relocate its North American headquarters from California to a $300 million facility near Legacy business park, completing the move in early 2017. The company will start surveying U.S. employees as part of a yearlong process to gauge how many plan to move to Texas. The surveys won’t specifically ask employees in California, Kentucky and New York to commit to the move, Jim Lentz, CEO of Toyota’s North American operations, said in a written response to questions from The Dallas Morning News. Rather, it will identify how many employees are considering the idea. Formal job offers for Texas will come later. Dallas Morning News
Submitted yesterday

-4
Likes

Will surging dollar halt Daimler’s plan for a U.S. Sprinter van plant?
For several months, Daimler AG has been kicking around the idea of setting up a full-blown North American production site for its Mercedes-Benz Sprinter cargo van to supply a fast-growing market. While the company hasn’t disclosed any preferred locations, it would make sense for its existing North Charleston factory to be at or near the top of the short list. But now the German automaker is looking at whether to tap the brakes on the idea. The culprit, in this case, is the strengthening U.S. dollar. Right now, Daimler makes the Sprinter back home at plants in Dusseldorf and Ludwigsfelde. To avoid stiff import tariffs, the vans that are shipped to the U.S have to be partially disassembled. Workers in Germany remove the drivetrains, fuel tanks and batteries and pack the loose components in containers. The parts and vehicles are then ready for their ocean voyage to the U.S. — only they must make the journey on separate cargo ships. Post and Courier
Submitted yesterday

7
Likes

San Antonio may be in better field position as Raiders run out of option plays
Oakland A's co-owner Lew Wolff said there isn't enough room for a new baseball stadium and a place for the Oakland Raiders to play in the proposed Coliseum City development envisioned by Bay Area leaders. If he's right, Oakland may not be big enough for the Raiders and A's, which could benefit San Antonio's quest to land an NFL franchise for the Alamodome. Wolff said the A's have "no interest" in the Coliseum City plan because a new ballpark for the Major League Baseball franchise would require plenty of surface parking that would gobble up much of the land available for the mixed-use project, InsideBayArea.com has reported. San Antonio Business Journal
Submitted yesterday

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 5563
 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Just look around at what's happening in the aerospace industry in the American South. Aerospace is really making a move to become one of the region's top two industry sectors. It’s not there yet, but if large project counts are any indication, aerospace may soon challenge the petrochemicals sector as the second largest industry in the region. Never before has the aerospace industry been so important to the South's economy. Oh, what's the No. 1 industry sector in the South? Automotive is, of course. That industry hasn't been challenged much for 25 years in this region, or since we’ve been counting.

 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

Top
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2015 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login