Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
0
Likes

Editorial: Trump’s crackdown on undocumented threatens PBC economy
The Trump administration’s new policy guidelines on cracking down on illegal immigration — if acted upon in full — could be a crippling punch to South Florida’s economy. Undocumented immigrants make up a huge amount of the labor force in agriculture, construction and tourism. These just happen to be pillars of the economy of Palm Beach County. Imagine the workers in these industries removed or in hiding. What then? Palm Beach Post
Submitted 23 hours ago

0
Likes

Why Trump's Immigration Crackdown Could Sink U.S. Home Prices
In San Francisco, an Indian software engineer on a work permit canceled plans to bid on a $900,000 home. In Washington, a Brazilian nonprofit executive passed on a fixer-upper near her office. And, in Mesa, Arizona, a 24-year-old son of undocumented Mexican immigrants won the trust of a bank -- a green light for a mortgage -- but now fears deportation. President Donald Trump’s immigration policies threaten to crack a foundation of the American economy: the residential real estate market. Legal and otherwise, immigrants, long a pillar of growth in homebuying, are no longer feeling the warm welcome and optimism necessary for their biggest purchase. Bloomberg
Submitted 23 hours ago

10
Likes

American CEOs send letter to House: Kill the 'made in America' tax
More than a dozen chief executives from some of the nation's biggest manufacturing companies called on lawmakers Tuesday to overhaul the corporate tax code and embrace a controversial proposal that would reduce the cost of exports but penalize imports. In a letter to House and Senate leadership, they argued that the current tax system penalizes American factory workers and restrains business investment and economic growth. Among the 16 executives who signed the letter are Dennis Muilenburg of Boeing, Jim Umpleby of Caterpillar, Thomas Kennedy of Raytheon and Gregory Hayes of United Technologies. CNBC
Submitted yesterday

29
Likes

Business executives' optimism surges under Trump, survey finds
Business executives are feeling more confident with Donald Trump in the White House, according to an annual survey from JPMorgan Chase. The survey found that 76% of the executives believe the new administration will have a positive impact on their businesses. The respondents cited the new administration's policy plans, including tax reform and reduced regulation. Only 12% said they expect a negative impact. CNN Money
Submitted yesterday

0
Likes

FPL accelerates plans to add solar power
TALLAHASSEE -- Florida’s largest electric utility intends to double its solar-energy plans for the coming year, leading solar proponents to praise the announcement — and say they would like to see more. A month after outlining plans to build four solar plants this year, Florida Power & Light on Monday said it will put up eight such facilities by early 2018. The company anticipates the plants — combining to create nearly 600 megawatts of power, enough for about 120,000 homes at peak production — will save customers “millions” over the lifetime of each center. Miami Herald
Submitted yesterday

8
Likes

Edsels of energy? Duke Energy may find new AP1000 nuclear plants are already outdated
In October and then again in December of 2016, Duke Energy won long-pursued federal operating licenses to build and run what was meant to be cutting edge nuclear power plants at sites in Florida and South Carolina. Duke has no current plans to proceed on either project. The dilemma? Now that Duke has finally secured these hard-to-get licenses, years have passed since these projects were first proposed. More than $1 billion (much of it still to be charged to customers via higher electric rates) have been spent on early site preparations. And what was once the modern design of the chosen nuclear plants, known as the AP1000, at both sites now looks outmoded by newer plans for smaller, less costly and quicker-to-build nuclear plants. Tampa Bay Times
Submitted yesterday

5
Likes

Japan company agrees to buy firm that owns 33 Arkansas newspapers for $3.3B
Tokyo-based SoftBank Group Corp. has agreed to pay $3.3 billion in cash to acquire Fortress Investment Group of New York, an owner of more than 120 newspapers nationwide, including 33 in Arkansas. Gatehouse Media, which Fortress acquired in 2005, owns daily newspapers in Arkansas in Pine Bluff, Fort Smith, Arkadelphia, Stuttgart and Hope; paid weeklies in 17 communities in the state; and free weeklies in 11 communities. Fortress is a diversified global investment company with $70 billion in assets under management and 1,100 employees. It manages assets for 1,750 institutional clients and private investors worldwide. Arkansas Democrat Gazette
Submitted yesterday

10
Likes

Here's how much the Charlotte Hornets, as well as the 29 other NBA teams, spend per win
As the NBA finished its All-Star break, it's worth a look to see how much each team pays for each win. Perhaps because they win so many games, the Golden State Warriors spend a league-low $2.1 million per victory; Steph Curry and his mates are 47-9. The Brooklyn Nets occupy the other end of the spectrum, doling out $8.7 million per victory. The Nets are 9-47 going into the break. Triangle Business Journal
Submitted yesterday

10
Likes

First SLS flight hardware leaving Decatur, Ala. for Cape Canaveral
The first piece of flight hardware for NASA's Space Launch System heads from North Alabama to Cape Canaveral next week just as it appears the piece may find a bigger job waiting there than expected. Key players in Alabama's rocket industry gathered Friday afternoon at the giant United Launch Alliance plant in Decatur to celebrate completion of the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS). A liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen engine, the stage's job is to push the Orion space capsule to the moon and back to Earth on the first SLS flight. News came from Washington this week that NASA may want to fly astronauts on that first flight. NASA has launched a study to see if that's possible. AL.com
Submitted yesterday

18
Likes

As stock surge, here are the companies trading at all-time highs
More than 300 U.S. companies hit new trading highs this week as the country's major stock indices continued what's being called the "Trump rally" by reeling off five consecutive days of record highs. The market's high fliers spanned a broad cross section of the U.S. economy, as companies as large and diverse as Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL) and JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) registered record share prices at various points throughout the week. Dallas Business Journal
Submitted yesterday

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 7134
 

 

Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

ODEC
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2017 Randle Report
All of the South's Business and Political News in One Place
Login