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New York Times puts spotlight on Alabama's Rickwood Field
Baseball has been a constant in Birmingham's history, and the area's oldest ballpark - Rickwood Field - was recently the subject of a heartfelt retrospective feature by the New York Times. Birmingham Business Journal
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Duke scientists: Fracking didn’t contaminate drinking water in Texas, Penn.
A group of Duke University scientists often accused of anti-fracking bias have published their most definitive research to date linking shale gas exploration with methane gas contamination of drinking water. But their paper, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scientists, exonerates fracking from the most serious environmental risks. The study blames the water contamination on leaky well shafts near the earth’s surface, not on the process of hydraulic fracturing itself, which takes place thousands of feet underground. News Observer
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Gas Drilling Is Polluting Water, But Don't Blame Fracking
The natural-gas-drilling surge is polluting groundwater, but that doesn't mean the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing is to blame. At least not directly. That's the conclusion of a new paper from researchers at several universities, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, who studied movement of gases in Texas and Pennsylvania regions with lots of gas drilling. National Journal
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America Pays More Than Anyone Else for Internet
The amount an American family spends on phone, television and Internet services each year can easily come to several thousand dollars. If that sounds like a lot, it is. In other parts of the world, communication services are much cheaper. A British family, for example, could spend roughly one-third of what an American family does for comparable communications services. Newsweek.com
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The Unsolved Jobs Mystery Facing the Fed
The Federal Reserve has had its foot on the gas for so long that the conventional wisdom says a tap of the brakes can’t be far away. But just when and how hard the Fed should hit those brakes is still the subject of furious debate. The right answer — what’s really best for the economy — depends in large part on how much “slack” there is in the labor market, and economists readily admit that’s a hard measure to gauge. The Fiscal Times
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Texas road debt: $23 billion
Texas has racked up $23 billion in road debt and will spend an estimated $31 billion retiring it over two decades, lawmakers said. That financial burden is a big reason why elected leaders and transportation advocates are pushing for Proposition 1, an amendment to the Texas Constitution that would allow part of Texas' oil and gas revenue to be spent on road and bridge projects. If Texas voters approve the amendment Nov. 4, roughly $1.7 billion will be available for road work in the first year, transportation officials said. wfaa.com
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Autos weigh on U.S. factory output; outlook still upbeat
U.S. manufacturing output fell for the first time in seven months in August, but the underlying trend remained consistent with a steadily expanding factory sector. Reuters
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BP's Lessons in Playing Nasty or Nice
Within weeks of the epic 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, BP (BP) apologized, acknowledged partial blame, began paying claims and cleanup costs, and sought to settle lawsuits rather than fight in court. Yet after spending more than $28 billion so far to make amends and dilute the public-relations debacle, the London-based oil giant remains enmeshed in litigation. So last year, BP tabled the charm offensive and tried bellicosity instead, accusing some Gulf businesses of submitting bogus claims and hinting broadly that the court-appointed administrator of the compensation effort might be favoring locals. Businessweek.com
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Most Americans Are Single, and They're Changing the Economy
If you are an American, odds are you’re single. According to a new report from economist Edward Yardeni, more than half of Americans aren’t married, up from 37 percent in 1976. He reckons a nation of singletons will change the structure of the economy because it means fewer parents and homeowners. Whether this is good or bad depends: Single people can be more flexible, which means fewer economic distortions and a more dynamic labor market, but it might make the economy as a whole riskier. Businessweek.com
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Virginia income tax dependence cited in report
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — - A report by the investment rating agency Standard & Poor's says the income gap is undermining budgets in Virginia and other states. The S&P report released Monday says Virginia is among the 10 states most reliant on income tax revenues. It concludes that income inequality is contributing to slower economic growth in the U.S. and as a result, states are facing rising tensions over whether to raise taxes or cut spending to balance their budgets. wdbj7.com
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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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