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How many jobs does clean energy create?
Declining costs of wind, solar power and energy efficiency is helping to drive a shift from fossil fuels generally — and coal in particular — to renewable energy and energy efficiency. From the first half of 2015 to the first half of 2016, renewable energy use rose by 9 percent while coal use in the U.S. dropped by 18 percent, according to the Energy Information Administration. What does this shift mean for jobs? From 2014 to 2015 solar employment increased by 6 percent while employment in upstream oil and gas and support services dropped by 18 percent. This reduction reflects both declining coal consumption and continued reduction in labor intensity. There are now more jobs in the U.S. in solar than in either oil and gas extraction or coal mining. Greenbiz.com
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Fracking continues boosting Texas’ economy
We’ve experienced a tumultuous year as a nation and more than an ample share of uncertainty around the globe. Even in these challenging times, we have many reasons to give thanks in Texas, tipping our hats to the oil and natural gas industry and the resources under our feet for a good bit of our good fortune here.
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Over 500 potential job applicants projected to attend job fair in downtown Jacksonville Wednesday
Some 500 to 700 potential Jacksonville hires are expected to show up to what is likely the last big job fair this year helping to get employers ready for the next year. JobNewsUSA.com is hosting the free job fair at the Prime Osborn Convention Center, 1000 Water St. Downtown on Wednesday. About 30 different companies will be at the free event that runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Florida Times Union
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JTA planning pilot, future with automated vehicles
Top Jacksonville transit officials expect driverless vehicles to be a part of the city’s public and personal transportation future. Jacksonville Transportation Authority CEO Nathaniel Ford said JTA officials are in discussions with some autonomous vehicle manufacturers and he hopes to have one of them soon bring a vehicle to Jacksonville for a demonstration. He said their target is to have a pilot program in the next two years. “I would love to develop some sort of a pilot program [with an autonomous shuttle], but that is in the early stages of how that will work,” said Brad Thoburn, vice president of planning, development and innovation for JTA. He said they must determine what is feasible for Jacksonville and a pilot would determine how a vehicle would work here. Florida Times Union
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A look at Sanford Burnham's shortfall
Orlando dry cleaners, day cares, and real estate offices are among businesses that would have benefited from a $4.8 million economic boost if Sanford Burnham had met job goals, according to a new analysis. Lured to Orlando a decade ago with more than $350 million in incentives, the California-based medical-research institute fell short of its goal to create 303 relatively high-paying jobs. The institute's shortfall of 64 relatively high-paying jobs takes a multi-million-dollar toll on the local economy annually, according to regional economic analysis by economist Sean Snaith, of the University of Central Florida. Orlando Sentinel
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Reed: Melbourne should approve bigger, better downtown project
The proposed Highline apartment development will be nearly twice as tall as last reported while – soon, I hope -- bringing hundreds of “creative class” renters to downtown Melbourne. Floridatoday.com
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Crown Automotive Group Is a Founding Funder of St. Petersburg’s Economic Development Corporation
Crown Automotive Group is proud to announce that it is among the founding funders of the all-new St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation (EDC), an organization dedicated to growing jobs in St. Petersburg. More than two years ago, the St. Petersburg Area Chamber of Commerce, City of St. Petersburg and community partners adopted a strategic plan entitled “Grow Smarter.” This plan outlined six major themes of focus for the city in order to promote sustainable and inclusive economic growth in the years to come. The EDC is intended to help retain, grow and attract key business sectors in order to further that economic growth. Prweb.com
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How Trump Could Create Millions Of Energy Jobs
President-elect Donald Trump wants to create millions of jobs by removing restrictions on American energy development, and the numbers seem to add up. Trump pledged in late November to “cancel job-killing restrictions on the production of American energy — including shale energy and clean coal — creating many millions of high-paying jobs.” Daily Caller
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New Orleans metro area adds 1,300 jobs while oil patch economies continue to shrink
Five of the state's nine metro areas added jobs during the 12 months ending in October, with New Orleans climbing 1,300 jobs. Still, Louisiana lost 6,000 jobs over the 12-month-period, but at a slower pace. "If you go back to December of last year, we were losing jobs at a rate of 25,000-plus a year. By April, it was still up at 16,000. This latest number is what? 6,000? That tells me that we're heading toward the bottom of the trough, and that's really good news," economist Loren Scott said. The Advocate
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How an economic developer is bringing factory jobs back to Mississippi
This past week, Donald Trump cut his first deal as president-elect. He leaned on Carrier, the heating and air conditioning company, to keep 1,000 jobs in Indiana from going to Mexico. The company got a generous tax break in return. In the last few decades, America has lost millions of factory jobs offshore. But you might be surprised to learn U.S. manufacturing is showing signs of coming back due to cheap energy, proximity to customers, and a rising cost of labor in China. Nearly a million manufacturing jobs have been created since the Great Recession. About 350,000 are unfilled because factories can’t find properly trained American workers. The new plants demand more brainpower than brawn. It’s called advanced manufacturing and if you want to see what it looks like you need to go a place off the beaten track: The Golden Triangle. That’s a bit of a misnomer because it’s one of the poorest regions in the poorest state: Mississippi. CBS News
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Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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