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Former Haley staffer Pitts to take reigns of S.C. Chamber
COLUMBIA, SC — Ted Pitts, former chief of staff for Gov. Nikki Haley, has been named as president and CEO of the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce. He will take over the role in January. Current chamber president and CEO Otis Rawl will serve as an adviser to the chamber’s board of directors during the transition, the organization said in a release Thursday. “As we move into the future, we are happy to welcome Ted to our team. Ted is an accomplished leader with a great knowledge of issues affecting business,” chamber chairman Mikee Johnson said in a statement. “His management experience and demeanor will serve this organization well as he leads the unified voice of business.” The State
Submitted 3 days ago

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Fla. Sen. Marco Rubio takes aggressive turn as face of opposition to President Obama's Cuba decision
WASHINGTON — As President Barack Obama dropped the bombshell about Cuba on Wednesday, Sen. Marco Rubio was hurrying to the Capitol where a packed room of reporters awaited. The Florida Republican stood outside for a moment, reviewing notes, then stepped to the podium and unloaded. "This president is the single worst negotiator we have had in the White House in my lifetime," Rubio said, contending Obama "has basically given the Cuban government everything it asked for and received no assurances of any advances of democracy and freedom." Tampa Bay Times
Submitted 3 days ago

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Va. Sen. Tim Kaine takes close look at local sea level rise
NORFOLK--Sen. Tim Kaine stood in the Larchmont neighborhood street and took in the strange view. "There are two over there," he said Thursday morning, pointing to homes across a sparkling inlet of the Lafayette River. "And two right there. There's one over there. And another one down there." He was talking about older homes elevated on new cinder block foundations to rise above flood waters that plague the neighborhood. The raised homes are scattershot, some here, some there. In a way, the scene reflects the lack of cohesive response, so far, to the threats of sea level rise and flooding. Virginian-Pilot
Submitted 3 days ago

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Norfolk Naval shipyard hiring for 1,500 jobs in coming year
Already one of the top employers in Hampton Roads, Norfolk Naval Shipyard is looking to hire another 1,500 workers by the end of September, the close of the federal fiscal year. That will mean a net gain of about 800 positions at the yard in Portsmouth, after accounting for roughly 700 employees expected to be lost through retirements, resignations and transfers. About 300 of the new hires will be apprentices, according to shipyard spokesman Jeff Cunningham. "We sure are hiring," Cunningham wrote in an email, adding that the available jobs are primarily in the skilled trades - welders, electricians and ship fitters, among others. Virginian-Pilot
Submitted 3 days ago

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McAuliffe: Newport News chosen by state to receive new enterprise zone
NEWPORT NEWS — State officials have selected Newport News to receive a new enterprise zone, an economic development tool to aid local businesses, Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced Thursday in Newport News. The new zone includes portions of the central and north sections of the city, hugging upper Warwick Boulevard between Fort Eustis Boulevard and Oyster Point Road. Oakland Industrial Park, Continental, the Ferguson headquarters and other businesses around the Newport News-Williamsburg International Airport and the Patrick Henry CommerCenter are included in the new zone, effective Jan. 1. Businesses in the zones can get state grants toward the cost of renovation or expansion of buildings, small grants for creating new jobs, and breaks on city business taxes. Daily Press
Submitted 3 days ago

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Clogged railroads lead to higher electricity costs
CHICAGO - Electricity costs are poised to reach the highest level since 1999 because railroads are too clogged to deliver enough coal to power plants. While the United States has the world’s biggest coal reserves, utilities are forecast by the government to end the year with the lowest stockpiles since 2005. With carriers including BNSF Railway jammed with record shipments of oil and grains, Xcel Energy Inc. and other power producers say they can’t get the coal they need. The rail delays mean utilities haven’t rebuilt inventories that fell to a seven-year low last winter. Power producers filed 10 notices this year warning regulators that stocks were low enough to threaten generation, compared with two filings in 2013. Utilities have been obliged to rely more on natural gas, increasing costs for consumers. Charleston Daily Mail
Submitted 3 days ago

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Plunge in Oil Prices Brings Jitters to Texas City
CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas—This Gulf Coast city has ridden a rocket of a rebirth in recent years, propelled by a more than 30-fold increase in oil production at the nearby Eagle Ford Shale since the beginning of 2010. Corpus Christi’s economy went from stagnant to zooming, growing by 8% in 2012 and 6% in 2013. Workers flush with cash have helped drive average home prices to nearly $200,000 from $150,000 four years earlier. The formerly sleepy port is bustling with crude shipments destined chiefly for refineries elsewhere in the U.S. and Canada. An old grain elevator now unloads sand used to crack shale formations through fracking and release oil and gas. Officials are building the first new public dock in more than 20 years. The Wall Street Journal
Submitted 3 days ago

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Energy firm bringing 160 jobs to South San Antonio
Houston energy company FMC Technologies is opening up an office in San Antonio that will bring 160 new jobs to the area over the next three years. The San Antonio Economic Development Foundation (SAEDF) and Bexar County made the announcement on Thursday. FMC Technologies (NYSE: FTI) has already begun construction on a 55,000-square-foot facility in South Bexar County that will house a regional research, testing and repair facility. The company will serve oil-and-gas firms operating in the Eagle Ford Shale. San Antonio Business Journal
Submitted 3 days ago

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Rays' future in Tampa Bay in jeopardy as city council rejects Trop exit deal
The Tampa Bay Rays and St. Petersburg's mayor go back to the drawing board after city council declined letting the Rays vet other stadium sites in a majority vote Thursday. After delaying the vote a week and some council members voicing indecision up until the vote, uncertainty over the terms of an agreement between Mayor Rick Kriseman and Rays President Brian Auld prevailed over uncertainty the Rays will leave. "He was hopeful the council would see that this was a good deal for the people of St. Petersburg," mayor spokesman Ben Kirby said in an interview after the vote. "The mayor's door is open. He's always willing to listen and talk further about the issue." Tampa Bay Business Journal
Submitted 3 days ago

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Georgia reverses course on new tax credits for film work
In a sure sign Georgia's film business is mature enough to stand on its own, entertainment industry executives are no longer looking to the General Assembly for tax incentives to spur growth. A legislative study committee met twice this month to consider expanding the state's package of film industry incentives to cover post-production work. But with the industry accounting for $5.1 billion in economic impact during the last fiscal year — up from just $242 million in 2007 — the consensus around offering additional tax incentives is there's no need to fix what's not broken. Atlanta Business Chronicle
Submitted 3 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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