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Kim Davis Heads To Court After Defying Supreme Court On Same-Sex Marriage
ASHLAND, Ky.-- A county clerk in Kentucky who has refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples based on her religious beliefs heads to court on Thursday where a federal judge could hold her in contempt for defying his order to do so. Huffington Post
Submitted yesterday

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Bill Straub: No one is asking Kim Davis to violate her conscience, just to do her job
Only in Kentucky. Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis doesn’t much like the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which held that same-sex couples have a right to marry under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution. In fact, she dislikes the ruling so much that she has refused to provide marriage licenses of any sort to anyone – thus refusing to conduct a specific duty of her office based on her religious convictions. KYforward.com
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AT&T, Kentucky Dept. of Education partner to bring high-speed Internet to all 173 districts
Today, AT&T announced that all 173 school districts across Kentucky could now boast high-speed, fiber-based connectivity with average bandwidth statewide of more than 480 megabits per second. Kyforward.com
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Salisbury ups the ante with 10G Internet speeds
Salisbury is kicking up the gigabit competition. Fibrant, the city’s optical-fiber service, has rolled out a super high-speed Internet service that can reach speeds of up to 10 gigabit per second. It means Salisbury's connection is now the fastest in the nation, according to officials there. Charlotte Business Journal
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Cushman & Wakefield, DTZ close $2B merger deal
In a deal expected to shake up Austin's commercial real estate industry, Cushman & Wakefield and DTZ have completed their $2 billion merger. Austin Business Journal
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Woman who landed Mercedes Georgia leaves for Google
The woman who landed Mercedes is leaving Georgia economic development to work for Google Inc. Amanda Shailendra, a director of life sciences and corporate solutions for the Georgia Department of Economic Development, is joining Google, which is launching high-speed broadband service across parts of metro Atlanta. Atlanta Business Chronicle
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The Future of Hemp in Georgia
The US Farm Bill of 2014 allows states to enact legislation to establish experimental hemp crops. State such as Tennessee and Kentucky and many others have enacted legislation and currently have hemp plants in the ground. GAcareproject.com
Submitted yesterday

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OUT to LUNCH
The Randle Report is breaking for lunch and making way for a new editor shift. Click on the headline above to access Southern Business & Development's Web site for more detailed information on economic development in the South. Posts will resume at 1:30 pm CDT.
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VIDEO: POLITICO Playback


Politico
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Labor Day Weekend Travel to Hit a 7-Yr High
Travel during this Labor Day weekend is poised to be the highest in seven years. Americans are planning to take a final trip before the end of summer, primarily due to record low gasoline prices and drop in airfares. This has significantly increased disposable income of travelers who now find it easier to hit the roads or take to the sky. Zacks.com
Submitted yesterday

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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