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Report: Alabama’s economy sixth slowest in the U.S.
Alabama’s recovery from the recession lags behind the rest of the country’s based on a recent report by Business Insider on how the states economies are doing. The state’s economy ranked as the sixth slowest in the U.S. Business Insider looked at the movement of eight economic measures in recent years: the unemployment rate, the number of non-farm payroll jobs, gross domestic product, average wages, the working age (18-64) population, value of international exports, house prices and auto sales. Here’s what it said about Alabama: “Alabama is growing into a major automotive producer, with three major international auto manufacturers. Other major industries include aerospace, chemicals, food processing and rubber and plastics. The University of Alabama (at Birmingham) is the state’s largest employer and is a ‘global leader in healthcare and medical research.’” Birmingham Business Journal
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Gov. Perry hires 'master of disaster' to help him defend against indictment
Mark Fabiani is so deft at helping distressed public figures that he once was dubbed in Newsweek as a "master of disaster." Now, he's got Texas Gov. Rick Perry's back. Fabiani is the latest to join Perry's oversized legal team, which is focused on putting together a defense against an indictment that alleges Perry abused his authority. Fabiani will work shoulder-to-shoulder with Tony Buzbee, Ben Ginsberg, Justice Tom Phillips, Bobby Burchfield and David Botsford. Fabiani, a Californian who got his law degree from Harvard, is perhaps best known for being a defender of Democrats. Perry is a Republican. Austin Business Journal
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Rick Perry: Been indicted, got fingerprinted, got the T-shirt
The mugshot of Texas Gov. Rick Perry looked so marvelous it's good enough to slap on a T-shirt. RickPAC, a political action committee that supports Perry, is selling T-shirts bearing his recently taken mugshot, the result of his indictment on charges of coercion and abuse of power related to his veto of funding for Texas' public integrity unit. The politician whom iconoclastic journalist Molly Ivins always referred to as "Governor Goodhair" hawked the new wares in a tweet on Friday. Austin Business Journal
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Atlanta Mayor discusses Michael Brown, ISIS on ‘Meet the Press’
Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed was part of a ‘Meet the Press’ panel on Sunday that discussed topics including the shooting of Michael Brown in Missouri, and threats posed by ISIS to the U.S. and other countries. Other members of the panel were Gwen Ifill, co-anchor and co-managing editor of PBS News Hour; David Ignatius, columnist for The Washington Post, and Michael Gerson, former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, now a columnist for The Washington Post. The panel was asked to weigh in on the shooting of Michael Brown, following a ‘Meet the Press’ interview with Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon. Atlanta Business Chronicle
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$50M Revitalization Plan Aims To Turn El Dorado, Ark., into Cultural Mecca
With a declining population and an unstable job market, the city of El Dorado is investing in quality of life in an effort to boost its economy. Madison Murphy, president of the Murphy Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life through the support of education and culture, said there are four things that will bring jobs to El Dorado: education, infrastructure, tax incentives and quality of life. After the creation of the El Dorado Promise, the Murphy Oil scholarship program, in 2007 and the passage of a 1 percent sales tax for a conference center and other economic development projects, city leaders began an initiative with destination developer Roger Brooks to look into further improving quality of life. Arkansas Business
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Novozymes' $36M, 100-job planned research facility in Triangle has a location complication
A Novozymes expansion, estimated to mean a new $36 million campus, could be in limbo. Not the project itself, clarifies a company spokesperson. That's happening in the Triangle no matter what. The new research facility, complete with 100 new jobs paying an average annual wage of $70,000 plus benefits, is still on track, and will support a new partnership between Novozymes and St. Louis agriculture giant Monsanto (NYSE: MON). It’s the location that’s in question – and that could impact the incentives being offered to the Danish company. Triangle Business Journal
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Atlanta Fed's Lockhart: Looking for several more months of confirming economic evidence
The Federal Reserve should wait several more months to make sure the economy is on track, the Atlanta Federal Reserve Bank president said on Friday. Dennis Lockhart, the Atlanta Fed president and a non-voting member of the Federal Open Market Committee, said that he is still "a little cautious" in declaring that recent economic data is conclusive evidence that the economy will maintain a strong trajectory. He also said that he is watching a broader range of indicators than simply unemployment, including paying specific attention to the numbers of marginally attached and involuntary part-time workers. CNBC
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A new space race so astronauts can stop hitching rides with Russians
Ever since the retirement of the space shuttle three years ago, American astronauts have had to hitchhike their way to the International Space Station aboard Russian spaceships. It is an increasingly costly arrangement, which the head of NASA has called “unacceptable,” made worse by U.S.-Russian tensions over the crisis in Ukraine. But in the coming weeks, NASA is expected to announce its long-awaited solution: a multibillion-dollar contract to build a U.S. spacecraft, which could help reignite a struggling American space program. Instead of paying the Russians more than $70 million a seat to ride their Soyuz spacecraft to the space station, the contract would give the United States the ability, for the first time in years, to launch American astronauts into space from U.S. soil. The Washington Post
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California vs. Texas in fight to attract and retain businesses
When California rolled out a $750-million plan this year to attract and retain businesses, many aspects mirrored longtime perks used by Texas — where officials love nothing more than stealing jobs from the Golden State. For more than a decade, Texas Gov. Rick Perry has touted the "deal-closing" Texas Enterprise Fund and other cash incentives as a "job-creation machine." A fifth of the companies that Texas attracted during the last funding cycle, in 2011 and 2012, were based in California. Los Angeles Times
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How Satanists Are Testing The Limits Of Religious Freedom In Oklahoma
A legal dispute of biblical proportions flared up in Oklahoma this week, pitting Catholics against Satanists in a case that raises questions about when — or if — the government can uphold the religious claims of one faith group over another. Earlier this month, a Satanic group in Oklahoma City known as the Dakhma of Angra Mainyu requested the use of the local Civic Center Music Hall on September 21 for the performance of a Satanic ritual known as the “Black Mass.” The announcement incensed local Catholics, primarily because the ritual, which has existed in various forms for several centuries, openly mocks the Roman Catholic Church and includes the intentional desecration of a “host,” or a wafer of bread used during the Catholic ritual of the eucharist. The city manager defended the decision to hold the event by citing the First Amendment, but the Archdiocese of the Oklahoma filed suit against the Satanists on Wednesday, arguing that the group intended to use stolen property during the event. Think Progress
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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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