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Over 100 Mayors Unite Against LGBT Discrimination Days Before Inauguration
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Two days before President-elect Donald J. Trump is to be inaugurated, 175 mayors from 42 states united on Wednesday to send a message: They will secure LGBT protections locally even if they're not advancing federally. The event launched a bipartisan coalition of mayors dedicated to providing support and resources to assist local governments that want to pass LGBT protections. The coalition created a website that outlines steps the group will take, including "championing municipal-level protections for LGBT people," "prohibiting non-essential travel to states with anti-LGBT laws," and "supporting local law enforcement on LGBT-inclusive trainings." The Advocate
Submitted 3 days ago

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Norfolk gets $23 million grant from Defense Department for new elementary school
Camp Allen Elementary School’s one-story building dates back to the early 1970s and has become rundown and overcrowded. But not for much longer. A new building will be on the way, paid for in part by a $23 million grant expected to cover most of the cost to replace the structure, federal officials announced Wednesday. The award is funded through the Department of Defense’s Public Schools on Military Installations Program. Camp Allen serves pre-K to fifth-grade students, most of whom are in military-connected families. The Virginian-Pilot
Submitted 3 days ago

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Ranking the Schools that Turn Poor Kids into Wealthy Ones
At a time when parents of college-bound students are waiting anxiously for news about acceptances and wondering about their children’s future, a new study from the Equality of Opportunity Project is out with a new way of evaluating the effectiveness of institutions across the country. The report used publicly available data to establish what it calls a “mobility rate” for each college or university in the country. The rate is a product of two factors: the percentage of its students whose parents are from the bottom one-fifth of the income distribution (the Access Rate) and the percentage of those students who eventually find themselves in the top earnings percentile (the Success Rate.) The Fiscal Times
Submitted 3 days ago

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Grant program reaps big benefits for city
Greenville is getting a big return on its investment in small businesses in the city. Since 2013, Greenville’s Office of Economic Development has helped businesses obtain more than $500,000 through North Carolina’s Rural Economic Development Division Building Reuse Grant program. The program provides grants to local governments to assist businesses with renovating vacant buildings or expanding an existing business. Reflector.com
Submitted 3 days ago

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20 jobs that offer the most flexible work options
People looking for a flexible job where they can telecommute might want to consider a position as an account executive. That's according to a new report by Boulder-based job service website FlexJobs, which lists the 20 jobs that will have the highest potential for being flexible in 2017. Business Journals
Submitted 3 days ago

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Bet You Didn't See This Coming: 10 Jobs That Will Be Replaced By Robots
I was recently talking to a friend of mine who’s an accountant. He has his own accounting firm and lives an upper-class lifestyle in the Chicago suburbs. As he's an accountant with an additional degree in economics, naturally the conversation veered to the future of the economy. He said he will happily pay for his daughter's college education, provided she won’t pursue a degree in accounting. This isn’t the first time I’ve heard a parent say they don’t want their child following in their career footsteps; a lawyer recently told me the same thing. And it’s not because they feel they've been unsuccessful or that their career was too demanding. Indeed, both are relatively well off and have plenty of free time to spend with their families. It's because they feel future job prospects in their fields are bleak due to one thing: automation. Fast Company
Submitted 3 days ago

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Japanese businesses seek aerospace opportunities in Orlando
There are 193 Japanese companies that accounted for 26,000 Florida jobs in 2016, according to Enterprise Florida. That number may grow in 2017 and the years to come due to interest in the aerospace industry and Orlando’s sustainability project. Orlando Business Journal
Submitted 3 days ago

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North Carolina Would Lose Big With Scott Pruitt Leading the EPA
OKLAHOMA ATTORNEY GENERAL Scott Pruitt faces members of a Senate committee this morning for what could be a contentious two-day confirmation hearing. The showdown will serve as a public referendum on his qualifications, views on climate change, and legal stance on whether the federal or state government should police the environment. On one side will be skeptical Democrats, poring over the 14 lawsuits he has filed to block EPA rules on mercury, ozone, carbon dioxide, waterways, and the Clean Power Plan regulating utilities. Friendlier questions will come from panel Republicans like West Virginia’s Shelly Moore Capito, who said Pruitt’s plans to stop environmental overreach are a “breath of fresh air.” Wired.com
Submitted 3 days ago

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Should Trump Get Credit For Saving All Those Jobs?
Donald J. Trump campaigned on bringing back American jobs. And even before his presidential inauguration, many big companies have announced plans to create thousands of jobs in the United States. But many of the newly announced jobs were already planned, and some companies have resisted changing their plans to cut or move jobs. Here is how the company announcements compare. New York Times
Submitted 3 days ago

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4 U.S. Industries Bracing For China Vs. Trump Retaliation
Eurasia Group posits that China will respond aggressively, but in kind, if and when soon-to-be president Donald J. Trump accelerates protectionist policies against Beijing. In a fresh report today Eurasia Group analysts Evan Medeiros and Michael Hirson offer this thesis on likely Trump trade policy: The “Trump administration will aggressively accelerate the pace of anti-dumping, anti-subsidy and other unilateral actions against specific Chinese imports, but they will not adopt across-the-board tariffs in order to maintain room for a negotiated solution…” And here’s the likely response from China, according to Eurasia Group: Barrons.com
Submitted 3 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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