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Cross Pollination: Fueling the Innovation Economy
I entered this huge building 8:30 am on a Monday. As I was looking around me, a tiny Egyptian pyramid was the first thing that caught my attention. This setting was starting to intrigue my curiosity. I took two steps forward and saw a couple of pictures pinned on the wall of people brushing their teeth and others having food. I started to wonder even more when I saw a room that seems to be inspired by Russian culture. I stopped for a moment to think what this place could be. Turns out I was at the headquarter office of AirBnb that is located at the heart of the city of San Francisco! Last month my fellow Palestinian entrepreneurs and I took a tour there, and the level of creativity invested in it amazed me. This visit made me realise that Airbnb aims to create a work environment that would reflect their business model in every single aspect, without having to get into long explanations, and to give you the chance to live the experience the moment you join their network, no matter who you are. Huffington Post
Submitted 2 days ago

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Cheap Gas for the Holiday, but Its Days Are Numbered
HOUSTON — Enjoy the low gasoline prices this Memorial Day weekend while they last. Even with global oil prices grinding higher, American holiday travelers will see the cheapest prices at the pump in more than a decade for this holiday weekend, saving nearly 50 cents a gallon compared with last year. But the bargain-basement prices are probably fleeting. New York Times
Submitted 2 days ago

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New Study Reveals Best Cities for Recent College Grads
New York or San Francisco? Kansas City or Columbus? Austin or Charlotte? The east coast, west coast, or the heartland? If you're a young person who's ever weighed these options by writing out a pros-and-cons list, chances are that you're worried about where to live post-college. Now, you can make a better-informed decision based on real data in a recently released report from Trulia, published in partnership with LinkedIn. Curbed.com
Submitted 2 days ago

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College Isn’t Always the Answer
During this particularly rancorous election season, at least one bipartisan consensus persists: More Americans, we are told, need to earn undergraduate degrees. The political debate tends to focus on the best way to graduate more people with less debt. But it makes little sense to send more students to college when nearly half of new graduates are working jobs that don’t require a bachelor’s degree, according to a 2014 report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Wall Street Journal
Submitted 2 days ago

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Dearth of women in middle-skill jobs adds to wage gap
Women would earn more and narrow the gender pay gap if they got jobs now dominated by men in fast-growing fields such as information technology, welding or truck mechanics, according to a new study by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. The study, which examined 473 occupations, found women in only about one-third of so-called middle-skill positions that pay at least $35,000 a year, even though they dominate in the category. About 80 percent of those women make less than $30,000 a year. Seattle Times
Submitted 2 days ago

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THE TECH BOOM’S SECOND CITIES
Last summer, after our son was born, my husband and I left San Francisco, our home for about fifteen years, and moved to Fort Collins, Colorado, a college town that is about an hour’s drive north of Denver. San Francisco is almost improbably pretty, a soft macaron of a city, and we were sad to leave, but we thought that it would be better if we did. My husband is a college professor, and I am a journalist, so we make a decent living by most standards, except those of coastal U.S. cities. We could afford to live in San Francisco only because we’d been lucky enough to find landlords who were willing, out of simple kindness, to rent us a one-bedroom apartment for well under market rate. (As Nathan Heller described in the magazine a few years ago, many longtime working-class residents haven’t been so fortunate.) But then I got pregnant. Our friends down the street, also writers, had a two-year-old who slept in a walk-in closet. Our closet wasn’t big enough for that, and we couldn’t move to a larger place in San Francisco, since a two-bedroom apartment would have more than doubled our rent. So when my husband was offered a job in Fort Collins, we eagerly moved. A couple of months later, our friends decamped to Seattle. New Yorker
Submitted 2 days ago

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Tampa named top hot spot for new residents in U.S.
The City of Tampa is booming, according to Realtor.com. The real estate site named the Bay area city the top place people are flocking to. And Tampa wasn't the only Florida city on the top 10 list. Jacksonville and Orlando also made the cut due to the state's unusually strong job creation and the fact housing prices haven't fully recovered from the crash yet, according to the site. Plus, the state has no income tax. Wtsp.com
Submitted 2 days ago

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Ranked: The 10 U.S. Cities With the Best Parks
The Minnesota cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul have the best park systems in the United States, according to The Trust for Public Land’s 2016 ranking, which was released today. The national nonprofit, which advocates for preserving green space for Americans, evaluated the 100 most populous U.S. cities on the metrics of park access (how many residents live within a 10-minute walk of a park), park size and investment, popular amenities, including dog parks, playgrounds and recreation centers, and more. Nextcity.org
Submitted 2 days ago

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100% renewable energy in 35 years? New report points the way
Is 100 percent renewable energy feasible for the world, or is it just a pipedream? It can be reality, according to a new report issued by Greenpeace. Energy [R]evolution: A Sustainable World Energy Outlook 2015 contends it is possible for Earth's electricity needs to be wholly provided by renewable energy by 2050, replacing both fossil-fuels and nuclear energy as electricity sources. That is an exciting premise, but it does depend on a lot of assumptions — technical, financial, and political — that are quite optimistic. Still, the claim is just feasibility, and that does seem reasonable under the given set of assumptions. Island Packet
Submitted 2 days ago

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Renewable Energy Jobs Surpass Oil and Gas Sector for First Time in U.S.
According to the latest data by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the overall clean energy sector (excluding hydropower) employed 8.1 million people worldwide in 2015, up from 7.7 million in the previous year. IRENA expects worldwide jobs to reach 24 million by 2030. Wlfi.com
Submitted 2 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
According to Chinese theory, yin is a passive, negative force and yang is an active, positive force. Chinese philosophers believe that the opposing forces aren't really contradictory. Instead, they are interconnected and complimentary, interacting to create a balance in one's life. 
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
The Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT report was released in the summer quarter. I try to read it every time it comes out since I find it to be the best indicator of child poverty, a statistic everyone involved in economic development needs to be aware of. The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a charity that supports disadvantaged children. 
 


 

 

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