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American CEOs sound off: What they would tell the next prez
America's CEOs, business leaders and policy experts know exactly what they would tell the next president to do — rebuild national infrastructure, invest in a changing workforce and revamp our tax system. And that’s just for starters. How do we know? The Kogod School of Business at American University in Washington, D.C., asked 50 U.S. business leaders exactly what they would tell Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump if they were summoned to the White House in January to offer a recommendation to grow the economy. Their suggestions ranged from typical business issues to tackling homelessness, childhood obesity and more. Washington Business Journal
Submitted 2 days ago

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Film execs: N.C. film grant applications slow in 2016
Wilmington, once home to productions such as “Firestarter” and “Dawson’s Creek,” is quiet on the filming front these days as local crews await the possible renewals of two recently-wrapped, first-season projects. Guy Gaster, director of the N.C. Film Office, says he “can’t recall” when his office received the last application for a chunk of North Carolina’s film grant funding coffer – the $30 million that’s been available for projects since July. Last year, public records show multiple applications had been submitted in July and August, including projects that went on to win state cash. Triangle Business Journal
Submitted 2 days ago

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2 of the nation's 'best places to live' are in South Florida
Good jobs and beautiful locations are among the shared attributes that make South Florida’s Weston and Wellington two of the best places to live in the entire country. So says Money magazine, which recently issued its annual "Best Places to Live in America" for 2016. The publication analyzed 60 different factors, from taxes and education to health care, crime, sports and employment, to compile its list of the "50 Best Small Cities in America." South Florida Business Journal
Submitted 2 days ago

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Reba McEntire weighs in on Nashville's boom
Even country music's biggest stars like to complain about the headaches Nashville's recent construction and population booms have brought. That's what I learned when I sat down with Reba McEntire recently to talk business, music and the “Nashville” show. McEntire said she spends most of her time these days on her businesses. Along with her clothing and retail lines at Dillard’s and Cracker Barrel, McEntire recently launched her own entertainment management company, Reba’s Business Inc.. The business allows her to be her own manager, after a recent split from her husband and manager, Narvel Blackstock. Nashville Business Journal
Submitted 2 days ago

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Why The Huffington Post says people must visit Louisville this fall
Louisville is often the subject of travel features in the spring, as the Kentucky Derby approaches, but now we're in the spotlight for our fall events. A blog post on The Huffington Post offers 21 reasons that "you need to visit Louisville" this fall. (Well, maybe not you, since you probably live here already. But for all those other people who don't.) The blogger, Lia Saunders, was born and raised in Louisville but has traveled all over the world. She says fall is the best time to visit the city — not just because of wonderful fall weather, but also because of our festivals, events, museums and, of course, bourbon. Business First
Submitted 2 days ago

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Screening company, 235 jobs jump state line to south Kansas City
Chalk one up for the Missouri side in the ongoing border war for Kansas City-area businesses and jobs. eScreen Inc., an Alere Inc. subsidiary that provides employment screening services, will be moving its headquarters and 235 jobs across the state line from Overland Park to Kansas City, the Missouri Department of Economic Development announced Thursday. Kansas City Business Journal
Submitted 2 days ago

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Dallas-based AT&T might have just complicated the future of internet
Just when you finally learned what fiber internet is, AT&T (NYSE: T) says it has invented a new way to deliver high-speed connections without building out infrastructure. The Dallas telco on Tuesday announced a new technology called “AirGig,” which the company says can deliver lower cost wireless without burying wires in the ground or putting up towers. AT&T will begin field testing the service in 2017. The technology delivers over power lines, without tapping into their power, using a mounted plastic antenna. The company says AirGig will be easier to deploy and cheaper. Dallas Business Journal
Submitted 2 days ago

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Alorica to create 830 jobs with customer engagement center in Owensboro, Ky.
FRANKFORT, Ky. (Sept. 21, 2016) – California-based Alorica plans to establish an 830-job customer engagement center in downtown Owensboro’s former BB&T building, marking one of the city’s largest-ever economic development projects, Gov. Matt Bevin today announced. “Alorica has extensive experience in operating customer engagement centers, and quickly concluded that they had found the right mix of positive, hard-working, forward-thinking people and an ideal location right here in Owensboro, Kentucky,” Gov. Bevin said. Lane Report
Submitted 2 days ago

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Nucor Corp. Plans New $230M Mill at Blytheville, Ark., 100 Jobs
Nucor Corp. on Tuesday said it will add a $230 million cold mill to its Blytheville operation as it seeks to grow sales to the automotive market. The company shared some of its plans with Blytheville city leaders last week when it requested a property tax abatement for the project. The full request could come before the city council Tuesday night, according to the Blytheville Courier News. In a news release, Nucor said the mill would allow it to produce products it doesn't currently make, expanding its capability "to produce advanced high-strength, high-strength low-alloy, and motor lamination steel products." Arkansas Business
Submitted 2 days ago

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Louisiana loses 17,100 jobs in August as oil and manufacturing slide
Louisiana's nonfarm employment fell by 17,100 jobs for the 12 months ending in August, as employment in seven of 11 economic sectors shrank. There were 1,963,700 nonfarm jobs in Louisiana in August, 0.9 percent less than a year earlier, according to preliminary figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Over the same 12-month period, the United States added 2.5 million jobs, a 1.8 percent increase. The figures were not adjusted for seasonal changes. Baton Rouge Advocate
Submitted 2 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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