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Cree snags $30M in tax credits for expansion, clean energy jobs
Durham-based Cree (Nasdaq: CREE) has obtained $30 million in federal tax credits to support its expansion and creation of clean-energy jobs. Triangle Business Journal
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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Baylor/Scott & White merge marks biggest Texas health care deal of 2013
In what was pitched as a marriage made in health care heaven, Dallas-based Baylor Health Care System and Temple-based Scott & White Healthcare wed in a ceremony that closed Oct. 1. Dallas Business Journal
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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The best budget deal a polarized Congress could make
After the ineptitude and intransigence on display in October's government shutdown, congressional leaders had nowhere to go but up. And so they have, modestly. Top members of the House and Senate budget committees struck a deal this week that would set funding limits for the federal government through September 2015, averting some cuts to defense and domestic priorities without increasing the deficit. Although the details are disappointing, it's noteworthy and welcome that a leading Senate liberal and a House conservative found a common path forward, even if it's not an ambitious one. Los Angeles Times
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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Congress Chooses Austerity Over Job Creation and Economic Growth
Most members of Congress were pleased with themselves Thursday. They agreed to agree – crossing lines of partisanship and ideology – on an austerity budget that, as Oregon Congressman Peter DeFazio has noted, “won't create jobs, get the economy back on track, or meaningfully cut the deficit.” That's not the worst of it. The Nation
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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How higher federal-retirement payments ended up in the budget deal
After a year of furloughs, budget cuts and uncertainty for federal workers, this much is clear in the congressional budget deal that the House will vote on Thursday: It could have been much worse. That may not be much consolation to future hires who will contribute more to their retirement accounts or working-age military retirees who will see their cost-of-living increases pared back for the first time since the 1980s. Washington Post
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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Deal to quell budget wars sails through U.S. House
A breakthrough budget deal that avoids a government shutdown in January and blunts automatic spending cuts easily won passage in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday, laying the groundwork for two years free of funding crises.A breakthrough budget deal that avoids a government shutdown in January and blunts automatic spending cuts easily won passage in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday, laying the groundwork for two years free of funding crises. Reuters
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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Obama to meet with mayors about jobs
President Obama will meet Friday with a group of mayors and mayors-elect to discuss job creation policies. The group will discuss "ways in which the Obama administration can serve as an active partner on job creation and ensuring middle-class families have a pathway to opportunity," said White House spokesman Jay Carney. Usa Today
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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Boeing plans $6 million, 400-job research center in Huntsville (updated)
Boeing plans to establish a $6 million research center in Huntsville that will bring up to 400 engineering-related jobs to the city. AL.com
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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Why States Should Stop Courting Boeing
States and cities across the country have been tripping over themselves this week to try to cast their regions as the most hospitable place for the aerospace industry—as if every region, in its back pocket, has the labor and skills needed to build jetliners. At stake is the location of a new Boeing manufacturing plant, where the company plans to assemble its 777x aircraft. Politicians and local economic development leaders act as if they can already see the headlines if their lucky state wins the bid: So-and-so governor or mayor brought Boeing to the area and created thousands of new, high-paying jobs. Hello reelection campaigns! National Journal
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

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Boeing to shift research jobs to South, Midwest
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Boeing announced Thursday that it is shifting hundreds of jobs to Alabama, Missouri and South Carolina as part of a restructuring of its U.S. research operations over the next two years. Seattlepi.com
Submitted 1 years 264 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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