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Shale bubble staying power debated
Domestic oil and gas production is discussed with great passion today among those who talk of an energy renaissance that is revolutionizing the industry and perhaps U.S. policy. They credit new hydraulic fracturing technologies in horizontal drilling for creating the potential of the United States being energy secure, if not independent, and promote the popular idea of being less reliant on countries that are not strong allies. Critics on the other end of the spectrum, however, aim to burst their shale gas bubble. Writers like Steve Austin of Oil-price.net goes so far as to call it delusional that the shale gas boom has the potential to solve the country's energy problems. Austin uses a towel-soaked-in-water analogy to describe fracking. Tulsa World
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Louisiana oil firms look to opportunity in Mexico
Louisiana companies are hopeful that Mexico will open its oil industry to further foreign investmentSpeaking at the Louisiana Gulf Coast Oil Exposition last week in Lafayette, executives of the Mexican national oil company said Mexico needs foreign investors. The Mexican Senate currently is debating reforms for Pemex, including changing the country’s constitution to allow foreign investment in Mexico’s state-owned company. The measure needs a two-thirds vote in both the Senate and the House. The Advertiser
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Georgia makes weak offer on water use issue
When the U.S. Supreme Court declined last year to review the the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision that allowed metro Atlanta to draw water from Lake Lanier, the state of Georgia thought its worries were over. They weren’t. Faced with a “fishery disaster” in the Apalachicola Bay oyster beds, Florida filed a suit in the U.S. Supreme Court that would reduce metro Atlanta’s water consumption to 1992 levels, a time when the region’s population was less than half of what it is today. If the reduction was successful, Atlanta’s growth would effectively stop. There would be no new water permits, which would mean no new housing developments, no new industries and little new construction. Montgomery Advertiser
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Saint Jean Industries to Lay Off 300 in Heber Springs, Ark.
HEBER SPRINGS - The mayor of Heber Springs says up to 300 of the 340 employees at a local plant may be laid off at the first of the year. Mayor Jackie McPherson told The Batesville Daily Guard that Saint Jean Industries Inc. has announced the layoff plans at the plant where parts and accessories for automobiles are made. McPherson says the layoffs are due to Saint Jean losing its contract with General Motors. The mayor says GM was the company's largest customer and that company officials are hopeful of winning the contract back. Saint Jean, of Belleville, France, bought the Heber Spring plant, then owned by Superior Industries International Inc., in 2006. The company announced a plant expansion in 2010 that added 250 jobs. Arkansas Business
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Thomasville, Ala., sold rural life to land Chinese manufacturer
THOMASVILLE -- Thomasville Mayor Sheldon Day fumbled through a mass of drawing boards, looking for the right preliminary plan. He shuffled past plans for the proposed retail development, the five-screen movie theater, the regional airport and the new hospital. He finally came to the board that displayed the big patch of land seven miles north of Thomasville just inside neighboring Wilcox County. Thomasville, population 4,421 according to the 2010 census (although Day disputes the figure), beat 62 other sites to secure the Golden Dragon Precise Copper Tubing facility, the first major manufacturer from China to locate in Alabama. When complete, the project is expected to employ 500. Dothan Eagle
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Ky. Gov. Steve Beshear, Rep. Hal Rogers announce Appalachian initiative
HAZARD, KY. — Kentucky political leaders have rolled out another initiative intended to find ways to bolster the economy in Appalachia. Gov. Steve Beshear and U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers held a joint press conference in Hazard on Monday to unveil the latest effort, which they dubbed SOAR, Shaping Our Appalachian Region. Beshear said the economic woes of recent years have hurt Appalachia and intensified the hardships of families in the mountain region. He and Rogers have scheduled a summit of public and private sector leaders to find solutions to problems the region faces. Beshear and Rogers cited the loss of thousands of coal jobs in Eastern Kentucky as one of the reasons for calling the summit, which will be held on Dec. 9 at the Eastern Kentucky Exposition Center in Pikeville. Louisville Courier-Journal
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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VIDEO & PHOTOS: Stage set to begin digging deeper Savannah harbor


Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Atlanta Falcons stadium cost grows to $1.2 billion
A billion dollars doesn’t go as far as it used to. The Atlanta Falcons today will inform a Georgia World Congress Center Authority committee that the budget for the new downtown stadium has grown to $1.2 billion. That’s up $200 million from the $1 billion that the team and others have used as a ballpark estimate all year. The Falcons break down the costs this way: $102 million for development and preconstruction, $73 million for design and professional services, $77 million for systems and equipment, and $948 million for construction and contingency. AJC.com
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Florida defense companies find business away from battlefield
With the threat of deep military spending cuts rippling through the defense industry, some Central Florida simulation-training contractors say they are carving out new business niches far removed from the field of battle. As part of that diversification, local companies are finding new customers in a wide range of non-defense industries, including automakers, big oil companies, law enforcement agencies, power utilities and medical device manufacturers, officials say. And while defense work still generates a majority of their revenues, the new commercial ventures are quickly gaining ground. Orlando Sentinel
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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As Jacksonville's cruise industry sails past 10 years, its economic impact touted
Bob Weston’s job as an embarkation team member at the JaxPort cruise ship terminal fits perfectly with his schedule as a retiree. On Thursday, Weston was shaking hands and offering warm greetings with some of about 2,000 passengers boarding the Carnival Fascination cruise ship as it was about to leave port for one of its many cruises that either go to the Bahamas or Key West. Weston has been with the cruise operations in Jacksonville since they started 10 years ago as part of Intercruises Shoreside and Port Services, one of the many subcontractors that help keep the cruise-ship operations running here. Florida Times-Union
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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