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Why Aren't Wages Outstripping Inflation?
Things appear to be looing good on the economic front: The stock market is up over the past year, profits have been rising and the U.S. economy has been growing for four years. Yet, wages for many American workers have been stagnant. NPR
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Stagnant Wages Are Crimping Economic Growth
Americans are spending enough to keep the economy rolling, but don't expect them to splurge unless their paychecks start to grow. Four years into the economic recovery, U.S. workers' pay still isn't even keeping up with inflation. The average hourly pay for a nongovernment, non-supervisory worker, adjusted for price increases, declined to $8.77 last month from $8.85 at the end of the recession in June 2009, Labor Department data show. Stagnant wages erode the spending power of consumers. That means it is harder for them to make purchases ranging from refrigerators to restaurant meals that account for most of the nation's economic growth. Economists blame three factors: Wall street Journal
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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American workers deserve a raise: Productivity has grown, so why are we earning less than we did 13 years ago?
The good news this Labor Day: Jobs are returning. The bad news this Labor Day: Most of them pay lousy wages and low if non-existent benefits. The trend toward lousy wages began before the Great Recession. According to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute, weak wage growth between 2000 and 2007, combined with wage losses for most workers since then, means that the bottom 60 percent of working Americans are earning less now than thirteen years ago. Salon
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Why the South Carolina governor’s race is the hottest ticket in town
South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (R) will launch her reelection campaign Monday afternoon with the help of some of the biggest names in the party, including Govs. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, Scott Walker of Wisconsin, and Rick Perry of Texas. A quick glance at what’s at stake in Haley’s race explains why some of the the heaviest hitters in the party are joining her kickoff event, and why Democrats, too, have such a keen interest in the contest. There are three main reasons why the South Carolina campaign is the hottest ticket across the gubernatorial landscape right now: Washington Post
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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S.C.'s Haley announces she'll run for governor again
GREENVILLE, S.C. — Gov. Nikki Haley came to Greenville with three other governors Monday to announce her re-election campaign in South Carolina's biggest Republican county, but Democrats weren't about to leave her alone in the spotlight and countered by staging their own events at the Bi-Lo Center. USA Today
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Out to lunch
The Randle Report is breaking for lunch and making way for a new editor shift. Click on the headline above to access Southern Business & Development's Web site for more detailed information on economic development in the South. Posts will resume at 1:30 pm CDT.
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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VIDEO: POLITICO Playback


Politico
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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2013 Is Shaping Up To Be A Horrible Year For Nuclear Power
The Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, which just two years ago had its license renewed, will be decommissioned, plant owner Entergy announced. This is the fifth nuclear plant in the U.S. to go down this year: Business Insider
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Why It Still Feels Like Recession To 95% Of America
If you want to claim the 2008 recession ended, you have to find a metric that reflects "growth." For instance, gross domestic product (GDP), which has expanded since 2009. Business Insider
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

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Louisiana’s Voucher Program Is Making Segregation Worse, Justice Department Finds
Louisiana school districts with a long history of racial segregation are becoming more segregated because of the state’s voucher program, according to a motion filed by the Department of Justice this week. Think Progress
Submitted 1 years 273 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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