Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
6
Likes

In Tampa Bay, now we're growing and graying at the same time
We're growing again but getting grayer, too. The Tampa Bay metro area will enjoy a solid if not booming return of population growth after several recession years when Florida lost or, at best, gained few residents. What's more, Tampa Bay will be one of the faster aging metro areas in the United States. Those are two key findings from some of the nation's top demographic experts who analyze population trends. That combination of more people moving here and more of them being over 60 raises some big challenges and opportunities for the Tampa Bay economy in the coming years. Tampa Bay Times
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

4
Likes

Economist: Triangle could take 40 percent of new N.C. jobs
CARY -- Economists around the state are offering less-than-rosy projections for 2013, but N.C. State University economist Mike Walden offered the Cary Chamber of Commerce some reasons for confidence. The professor predicted more jobs and consumer spending, especially in the Triangle and Charlotte. Jobs magnet: Walden predicts the Research Triangle will take between 33 percent and 40 percent of all new jobs in North Carolina this year. Raleigh News & Observer
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

2
Likes

Rick Perry's second chance
If Texas GOP Gov. Rick Perry is serious about running again for president – he has said he might take another bite at the apple in 2016 – or even running for re-election in 2014, the business of rehabilitating his damaged political brand will begin in earnest Tuesday when the legislative session opens. The legislative session that opens Tuesday will give Gov. Rick Perry a chance to burnish his credentials if he chooses to make another run for president in 2016. But some are hard-pressed to imagine a session — or anything else — good enough to make voters forget his disastrous White House race that limped to an end just about a year ago. Politico
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

-5
Likes

With decision looming, green groups press Obama to kill Keystone XL pipeline
More than 70 green groups urged President Obama in a Monday letter to kill the Keystone XL pipeline to make good on promises to address climate change. Obama has publicly pledged to tackle climate change a handful of times since Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast, though without detailing specific policy plans. In their letter, the groups said Obama should speak out more often on climate change, impose emissions limits on existing coal-fired power plants and focus on creating clean-energy jobs. They added the president also should shut down the proposed pipeline that would bring Canadian oil sands to Gulf Coast refineries. The Hill
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

5
Likes

Tax Incentives Only Part of Picture for State Business Climates
States each year dole out a collective $80 billion in incentives and tax breaks for businesses they hope to lure or keep within their borders. But those that spend the most on incentives aren’t necessarily winning the end game, some experts say. States that put the most stock in handouts to businesses don’t always earn high scores for being business friendly, a Governing analysis of data on tax incentives and business reputation has shown. Texas spends 51 cents of every budgeted dollar on incentives, according to a New York Times database, but still rates as average in Moodys' Cost of Doing Business Index. Meanwhile Iowa spends 4 cents on the dollar but rates in the top 10 in Moodys’ index, thanks to cheaper labor and energy costs. Governing
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

1
Likes

Nearly 40% Of Private Sector Job Growth In December Was Subsidized By The Government
The U.S. economy created 168,000 private-sector jobs in December. But all private-sector jobs are not alike, of course. One way to examine them is by determining which are the mostly the result of market forces and which are the result of debt-fueled government subsidies. Alan Tonelson of the U.S. Business and Industry Council: This morning’s jobs report shows that the economy’s subsidized private sector (industries like health care services that receive big government subsidies) is back as a major source of new hiring. Business Insider
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

2
Likes

Data Centers, 7 Dying Technologies and a Broadband Partnership
Are government data centers becoming passé? Not yet, but a good number of chief information officers would like to get rid of the expensive centers and move their data, systems and applications into the information technology cloud. Throughout 2012, a growing number of states and localities began to do just that. Consider: Governing
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

-2
Likes

Rick Scott Still Skeptical of Federal Health-Care Reform
After meeting with U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in Washington Monday, Florida Gov. Rick Scott sounded decidedly unswayed as he continues to weigh how much of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) his state will implement. He characterized the hourlong meeting as “hopefully productive." Marilyn Tavenner, director of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), also attended. Governing
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

13
Likes

Smart grid and economic development?
As is often the case, a factoid floated by and sparked a thought. Last week, IMS Research reported that less than 20 percent of the 1.4 billion electricity meters in the world could communicate; just a subset are the two-way interval meters on residential homes that have gained notoriety in the United States. The report suggested that the advanced meter markets for the U.S. and Europe are "well understood"; that is, in my view, well-quantified and cresting. Meter shipments on the rise are heading towards China, India and Brazil. Of those markets, only China appears to be hot for advanced meters, according to IMS Research. Intelligent Utility
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

7
Likes

Economic incentives luring big business to north Fulton, Ga.
ALPHARETTA, Ga. — While leaders in one North Fulton city are hopeful state-sponsored economic incentives will lure jobs to town, leaders in a neighboring city confirm to Channel 2 Action News those incentives are about to bear fruit in a big way. This week, Alpharetta learned that it will be allowed to create a so-called "opportunity zone" along Windward Parkway at the Cobalt Center, which once housed AT&T office space. "It provides a significant tax benefit for new jobs to Georgia, about $3,500 per job," Economic Development Director Peter Tokar told Channel 2's Mike Petchenik. "It keeps us competitive in the region in that we can compete with other opportunity zones."
Submitted 1 years 285 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

	http://www.scprimesite.com/portal/page/portal/SCPrimesite/?cmpid=SB_rr
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2014 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login