Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
16
Likes

Judge refuses to suspend BP settlement payments
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge refused Friday to temporarily shut down a multibillion-dollar settlement program for compensating victims of BP’s 2010 Gulf oil spill, saying he has seen no evidence of widespread fraud among the tens of thousands of claims. The judge also said he was offended by what he saw as attempts to smear the lawyer administering the claims. BP PLC argued that all payments to Gulf Coast residents and businesses should be suspended while former FBI Director Louis Freeh investigates alleged misconduct by a lawyer who worked for claims administrator Patrick Juneau on the settlement program. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier said he was troubled by the allegations but didn’t see any reason to take the “drastic step” of shutting down the program without evidence of widespread fraud. The Advocate
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

2
Likes

Electric Cooperatives Of Arkansas Inks Wind Energy Deal
The Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corp. (AECC) has reached a long-term agreement to purchase 150 megawatts of wind energy from RES America Developments Inc., a subsidiary of Renewable Energy Systems Americas Inc. (RES Americas). “The additional 150 megawatts of low-cost wind energy provides AECC with a hedge against fluctuating natural gas energy prices,” said Duane Highley, president and CEO of AECC, a Little Rock-based wholesale electricity supplier. “AECC will have 201 megawatts of wind energy in its generation assets with this addition. We will continue to pursue energy options that allow AECC’s member cooperatives to provide reliable electricity at the lowest possible cost.” The wind power will be sourced from the Origin Wind Energy project, which is located in Murray and Carter Counties in southeast Oklahoma. TalkBusiness.net
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

1
Likes

Alorica says 300 to be hired at Tulsa service center
Customer management outsourcing company Alorica Inc. announced Thursday it will add 300 employees at its Tulsa location. The company said in a news release that it already has begun hiring and will continue to do so during job fairs to be held from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at its facility at 14002 E. 21st St., Suite 600. Applicants can also apply online at tulsaworld.com/alorica Alorica said the hiring is necessary because of new client business at the site. Tulsa World
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

3
Likes

Alabama unemployment rate declines in June as labor force expands
MONTGOMERY, Alabama – Alabama’s unemployment rate moved lower in June as the state’s labor force continues to grow from the levels of a year ago. Jobs were gained in sectors including construction and transportation. Governor Robert Bentley today announced that Alabama’s preliminary June unemployment rate is 6.5 percent, down from last month’s rate of 6.8 percent and well below last year’s June rate of 7.6 percent. June 2013’s rate represents 140,148 unemployed persons, compared to 147,720 in the previous month and 163,982 in June of 2012. MONTGOMERY, Alabama – Alabama’s unemployment rate moved lower in June as the state’s labor force continues to grow from the levels of a year ago. Jobs were gained in sectors including construction and transportation. “We’re working hard every day to recruit more jobs for the people of Alabama,” Governor Bentley said. MadeinAlabama.com
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

7
Likes

RTP Asks For New Ideas for New Park
Research Triangle Park – It’s no secret that the Research Triangle Park of North Carolina has been planning a global-scale redevelopment and that it has been looking for ideas. Last year, the Park’s staffers went on a bus tour across the entire state, to listen – and to learn – from North Carolinians – and to ask the question, ‘what great things can we do together?’And from location to location, from Boone to Fayetteville, they heard the same thing: that big ideas are needed. But big ideas do not come easily; or quickly. And they do not manifest all on their own. RTP.org
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

14
Likes

Tampa Bay area suddenly basking in big economic wins
Listen carefully and you can hear a collective Ouch! from Tampa Bay business leaders. They are pinching themselves today, making sure they are not dreaming amid the recent bonanza of very real economic development coups realized in the past days and weeks, along with some strong possibilities of landing some pending deals. Bristol-Myers Squibb. Check. Copa Airlines. Check. Bass Pro Shop. Check. Edelweiss Air. Check. Amports. Check. Amazon. Very promising. Trader Joe's. Very likely. Small wonder that economic development chief Rick Homans, CEO of the Tampa/Hillsborough EDC said his whole organization is on "Cloud 9." Tampa Bay Times
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

9
Likes

Governor Scott Announces Bristol-Myers Squibb Company to Locate North America Capability Center in Tampa Area
Today, Governor Rick Scott announced Bristol-Myers Squibb’s plans to locate a North America Capability Center and create 579 life sciences jobs in Tampa. The 70,000-square-foot facility will be located in Hillsborough County, and will open in January 2014 with approximately 250 employees. The company will add more than 325 additional jobs supporting scientific and technical activities at the site by 2017. Governor Rick Scott said, “Bristol-Myers Squibb’s decision to open this new facility in Tampa and create 579 jobs is great news for Florida families. Since taking office, my focus has been on job creation and turning Florida’s economy around. We have worked tirelessly to improve the state’s business climate by removing cumbersome regulations and taxes, and strengthening our workforce. Announcements like this from Bristol-Myers Squibb show that companies are taking notice of our economic turnaround and that it’s working in Florida.” Florida Governor's Office
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

6
Likes

Dallas-based Aegis adding 5K workers to US centers, including in W.Va.
DALLAS -- Aegis Limited has announced plans to add about 5,000 workers to its U.S. call centers with more than half of the new jobs in Texas. Spokesman Kevin Nolan said Friday that a lot of the jobs will support open enrollment for the company's health care clients. Nolan declined to identify clients of the outsourcing and technology services company, which has its Americas headquarters in Dallas. Aegis is part of the Essar Group based in Mumbai, India. About 1,800 workers will be hired at a call center in Irving. The Killeen center will add about 1,400 employees. Other jobs will be added at centers in Arizona, Missouri, Florida, West Virginia and New York. Charleston Daily Mail
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

4
Likes

LOOK: Death And The 'Poverty Belt'
Living in a high-poverty area often means a lifetime of struggle with underperforming public schools, limited job opportunities, higher crime rates, and poor nutrition, health care and housing — all of which can add up to a shorter, sicker retirement. Americans who live in the South can expect to live fewer healthy years past 65 than those who live in other parts of the country, according to a new report from the CDC. Health disparities among seniors in their final years align closely with profound geographical differences in poverty. Huffington Post
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

0
Likes

Are Robots Killing Job Growth?
The economic recovery is now four years old, and job growth remains a big problem. Since the recession technically ended in June 2009, American businesses have expanded their workforces at an average annual rate of 1.4 percent, creating some 6.1 million new jobs. The good news? We’re creating new jobs at twice the rate seen in the first four years of the previous expansion. The bad news? These gains are much smaller than those seen in the early years of the expansions of the 1980s and 1990s. Economists have been wondering whether the slow pace of jobs growth is a feature of this particular cycle, or whether American businesses have lost some of their storied capacity for generating new jobs. The answer, of course, is that both factors are at work. And while there’s growing optimism that the pace of job creation will pick up, there’s reason to be skeptical. In the coming decade, new robotic technologies could further aggravate the problem. Daily Beast
Submitted 1 years 280 days ago

 

 

 

Most Liked Stories (past 24 hrs.)


Most Disliked Stories (past 24 hrs.)


Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

Winston-Salem NC
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2015 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login