Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
0
Likes

Atlanta hiring up a bit in July
Month-over-month hiring in Atlanta was up 0.3 percent in July, while the average paycheck was down 0.3 percent, SurePayroll’s monthly Small Business Scorecard shows. Atlanta Business Chronicle
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

Should Sen. Wendy Davis have to foot the bill for extra special sessions?
Gov. Rick Perry made good on his threat to call a third special session Tuesday, after lawmakers failed to approve a transportation bill that would have chipped away a bit of our highway underfunding problem. And lawmakers are testy. They signed on for a five-month gig, and here they are into their eighth month, still stuck in Austin. Not to mention the money it’s costing the state: Each 30-day special session runs $800,000 to $1.3 million. That’s not chump change, especially considering all the cuts made in the last budget cycle. Dallas Morning News
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

TX Gov. Perry calls third special session
AUSTIN — Lawmakers hoping to hit the road Tuesday barely had time to pack before Gov. Rick Perry called them back to work to address transportation funding. Whether it will do any good remains unknown, with legislators deeply divided on how to shift about $900 million annually to highway repairs and improvements. mysanantonio.com
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

12
Likes

CLIMATE CHANGE: Southeast Impacts & Adaptation
Over 70 million people live in the Southeast. [1] The region includes many cities with populations over 250,000, including Houston, Jacksonville, Charlotte, Atlanta, Miami, and New Orleans. [1] The region's economy includes forestry, tourism, oil and gas production, and agriculture. The Southeast also includes 29,000 miles of coastline. [2] EPA.gov
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

-4
Likes

Study: Sea-level rise threatens 1,400 U.S. cities
A rise in sea levels threatens the viability of more than 1,400 cities and towns, including Miami, Virginia Beach and Jacksonville, unless there are deep cuts in heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions, says an analysis out Monday. USA Today
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

Alabama attorney general: Economic development can help cut down on crime
POINT CLEAR, Alabama – Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange told economic developers gathered here what they do has a direct correlation on crime in the state. “Just based on my own experience, we need to get our youth off on the right foot,” he said, adding that too many youth get off on the wrong path today. AL.com
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

-1
Likes

North Carolina Ends Teacher Tenure
North Carolina has become the latest state to overhaul its teacher tenure rules, directing school administrators to offer four-year contracts to top performers but one- or two-year contracts to everybody else. Pew States
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

Georgia's TSPLOST: One Year Later
Exactly one year ago Georgia voters went to the polls to cast their ballots and decide the fate of the state’s Transportation Investment Act (TIA). The act allowed each of the state’s 13 regions to decide whether to implement an additional penny sales tax for transportation, which was commonly referred to as T-SPLOST. GPB.org
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

-3
Likes

Has U.S. Manufacturing’s Comeback Stalled?
Everywhere you look, there is buzz about U.S. manufacturing’s comeback, including in the high-tech sector. Motorola Mobility, owned by Google, is hiring 2,000 workers to produce its new Moto X phone in Fort Worth, Texas. It will be the first smartphone assembled in the United States. Pew States
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

Out to lunch
The Randle Report is breaking for lunch and making way for a new editor shift. Click on the headline above to access Southern Business & Development's Web site for more detailed information on economic development in the South. Posts will resume at 1:30 pm CDT.
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

 http://www.allianceswla.org
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2015 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login