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What Makes Employees Work Harder: Punishment or Pampering?
You're a boss. You have a bunch of employees you consider under-motivated, unproductive, and, well, sorta lazy. You wonder: How do I make them talk less? Focus more? Try harder? Think more creatively? Just be better? The Atlantic
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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Richard Trumka wants Texas ‘14 labor push
AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka says the labor organization is targeting some new states in 2014, namely, Texas. Citing the Lone Star State’s rules prohibiting county fire codes, he called Texas’s working conditions “concerning,” and suggested more unions were necessary to protect minority workers’ rights. Politico
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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Ingalls President Irwin Edenzon talks shipbuilding plan, workforce development at Pascagoula Rotary luncheon
PASCAGOULA, Mississippi - Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon spoke candidly with the Pascagoula Rotary Club today about the long-term future of the Pascagoula shipyard, the effects of sequestration and workforce development. Gulflive.com
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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Texas regulator to feds: Keep out!
Keep the federal government out of Texas oil and gas. That was the message from Texas Railroad Commissioner David Porter Thursday at the World Oil Shale Energy Technology Conference in Houston. Fuel Fix
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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Out to lunch
The Randle Report is breaking for lunch and making way for a new editor shift. Click on the headline above to access Southern Business & Development's Web site for more detailed information on economic development in the South. Posts will resume at 1:30 pm CDT.
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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VIDEO: POLITICO Playback


Politico
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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ObamaCare Was Sold To American Voters On Deceptive Terms
One of the strange things about the market for health insurance is that almost none of us ever sees a real price. More than 90 percent of people with private coverage get it through an employer. Employers, on the average, pay about three-fourths of the cost and the remaining share tends to be the same for every employee ― irrespective of expected health care costs. Forbes
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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Study: Obamacare rate concerns 'overblown'
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- With Affordable Care Act set to begin in earnest next year, fears are mounting that insurance premiums will skyrocket when American workers re-enroll for health benefits through their jobs. But experts and a newly released study say those fears appear largely unfounded. USA Today
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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Study Finds Obamacare Won’t Hike Workers’ Premiums: ‘The Rate-Shock Concerns Were Overblown’
Upcoming changes under Obamacare aren’t likely to force smaller companies to severely hike the premiums they charge their workers, according to a new study from the nonprofit research group Rand Corporation. The study’s results are in contrast to doomsday predictions that the health reform law’s requirements will put too much of a burden on business owners, causing their employees’ health costs to skyrocket. Think Progress
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

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How the GA-based Chick-fil-A Kickoff is changing college football
ATLANTA — Among bowl games that aren’t part of the BCS system, none has been more consistently successful over the past 10 years — either in attendance or television ratings — than the Chick-fil-A Bowl. In 2006, that led the game’s organizers, who were trying to elevate the game to BCS status, to ponder whether a second bowl in Atlanta before Christmas might be worthwhile. Tucsoncitizen.com
Submitted 1 years 338 days ago

 

 

 

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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