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Clues Could Come Early in State-by-State Battle
The most expensive presidential race in American history now becomes the biggest show on television, a night with enough uncertainty that it could become a telethon lasting well into morning. For the third time in the last four presidential campaigns, the Democratic and Republican presidential nominees went into Election Day close in the national polls, with not one of the major opinion surveys giving President Obama or Mitt Romney a lead of statistical significance. But presidential races are decided in the states, and the nation will get an answer to the opposing cases for victory that each candidate has made for so many months. It will finally know, as one of Mr. Obama’s top aides has put it, “which side is bluffing” and whether battleground-state polls, which have given Mr. Obama a slim but consistent edge where it matters most, accurately foretold the outcome. The New York Times
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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God-in-government cases make Texas a key player in national struggle on issue
CEDAR PARK — Texas might not be a battleground state in Tuesday’s presidential election, but it is home to a number of fights — some in progress and some already decided — that could have a bearing nationally on the place of God in government. National advocacy groups have focused much of their efforts in Texas, most recently on Hays County commissioners’ opening their meetings with prayer, the Cedar Park Police Department putting a cross on its chaplain’s seal and Kountze High School cheerleaders’ carrying Christian signs at football games. Jeff Mateer, general counsel for the Plano-based Liberty Institute, a group that launches court fights on behalf of Christian priorities and issues, said challenges to prayer policies in local Texas governments have become more common. Dallas Morning News
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Georgia’s Voters Will Decide on Future of Charter Schools
ATLANTA — Staff members in the charter school division of the Georgia Department of Education keep notepads in their offices inscribed with a mantra: “Is it best for students? Then do it.” But when it comes to charter schools, parents, teachers, education officials and legislators are deeply divided over what exactly would be best for students. Here in Georgia, the future of charters, which are publicly financed but privately operated, could be determined Tuesday by a ballot measure that asks voters to amend the State Constitution so that an appointed statewide commission could authorize new schools. The New York Times
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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INVESTMENT READY PLACES
The small towns and cities of America are once again becoming the new frontier for development. Having languished for decades with the decline of the manufacturing economy, these communities lost population, jobs, and capital. However, today an intersection of three overarching phenomenon presents a unique opportunity to reconsider these communities as places worth our time and investment: Street Sense
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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8 Ideas to Improve Higher Education
Community colleges are the least glitzy, most proudly diverse, and stubbornly egalitarian workhorses of American public higher education. With a modest average tuition of $2,963 per year, these two-year colleges quickly prepare students for careers (and often serve as a springboard for those seeking a degree at a four-year institution). According to a recent study by the American Association of Community Colleges, state and local governments get an estimated 16% return on investment for every $1 they spend on community colleges, along with the societal benefits of having a better educated, higher-earning workforce. Time
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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UN-Habitat Launches the City Prosperity Index
The current and future economic health of cities was a primary focus of the September 2012 World Urban Forum in Naples, Italy. Recent research by UN-Habitat, however, suggests that development actors need to explore a more inclusive approach to prosperity and development. The organization’s data and conclusions are presented in a new report, “State of the World’s Cities 2012/2013: Prosperity of Cities.” According to the report, policymakers worldwide need to take a broader, more robust approach to development — one that looks beyond the narrow focus on economic growth that has dominated the poorly balanced policy agendas of recent decades and includes other vital dimensions, such as quality of life, adequate infrastructure, equity, and environmental sustainability. Huduser.org
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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What Will Government Look Like in 2037?
This month marks Governing’s 25th anniversary, so we asked leaders for their predictions on how government will have changed 25 years from now. Governing also asked our Facebook readers 1) what they think the most pressing state and local issues will be 25 years from now and 2) what they think the biggest changes in state and local government will be in 25 years. Some of their responses appear throughout the article. Share your thoughts with us too. Scott Smith is the mayor of Mesa, Ariz., and vice president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. A tax overhaul. There’s no doubt that the three primary sources of revenue for local governments -- sales tax, property tax and income tax -- are under strain. Governing.com
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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US Lags in Race for Tech Talent
SAN FRANCISCO: From all appearances Silicon Valley is booming, but it’s a deceptive image. The sources of innovation which have always powered the Valley are seeping away, taking with them the lifeblood of a giant technology wealth machine. A steady stream of immigrant innovators are saying goodbye to America and heading home. Rents and salaries are soaring in Silicon Valley. The tables are full for breakfast at Buck’s in Woodside and The Creamery in San Francisco with venture capitalists quizzing young masters of the digital universe in search of the next Facebook or Instagram. Across the Bay Area, free lunch is served, preferably organic and local. But many talented individuals no longer find the US an attractive place. Yale Global
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Best Practices Rise to the Top in Digital States Survey
The 2012 Digital States Survey, conducted every two years by the Center for Digital Government (CDG), amasses an impressive inventory of strategies employed by states across the country to advance state priorities using technology. Entries received are analyzed by a CDG panel of analysts, executives and Senior Fellows, who score responses in several categories. Weighted scores generate an overall grade for each state, as well as a list of the highest achievers in individual categories. The notable examples of best practices are: Govtech.com
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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World clean energy investment heading for a drop in 2012, after mediocre Q3
Morocco and Brazil are strong features, as third quarter investment slips 5% to $56.6bn London and New York, 9 October 2012. Global investment in clean energy totalled $56.6bn in the third quarter of 2012. This was down 5% on the second quarter and 20% lower than in Q3 2011, explained partly by weaker figures from the US and India, and a lull in wind farm financings. Today’s figures, published by research company Bloomberg New Energy Finance, suggest that the full-year 2012 figure for investment in clean energy is likely to fall short of last year’s record $280bn . If so, 2012 would be the first down-year for world investment in the sector for at least eight years. Bloomberg
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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