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Miami-Dade, Oklahoma City mayors lay down bet on Heat vs. Thunder match-up
With the NBA Finals on the line, players and fans from the opposing cities traditionally start the trash talk — and so do the mayors. On Monday, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez and Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett made a friendly wager on the outcome of the NBA Finals, which kick off Tuesday night. Here are their bets: If the Miami Heat win the seven-game championship series, Mayor Cornett will ship to Miami-Dade premium steaks from Oklahoma. “I’m hungry for a nice Oklahoma steak, so hopefully our guys will go out there and bring back a trophy and dinner to go with it,” Gimenez responded. If the Thunder come out on top, Mayor Gimenez will ship South Beach’s famous Joe’s stone crabs “out to the Great Plains.” Miami Herald
Submitted 1 years 307 days ago

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Flat U.S. Wages Help Fuel Rebound in Manufacturing
The celebrated revival of U.S. manufacturing employment has been accompanied by a less-lauded fact: Wages for many manufacturing workers aren't keeping up with inflation. The wage lag is a key factor contributing to the rebounding competitiveness of U.S. industry. A recent uptick in factory employment and the return of some production to U.S. shores from abroad both added jobs that probably otherwise wouldn't exist. But sluggish wages also are squeezing workers' incomes and spending. That, in turn, hurts retailers who target middle-income earners and restrains the vigor of the economic recovery. The Wall Street Journal
Submitted 1 years 307 days ago

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Nashville vies for 'hip' tech workers
Can hip, young technology workers be enticed to move to Nashville from such cool places as New York, Boston, San Francisco, Seattle and Portland, Ore.? That’s the question the Nashville Chamber of Commerce and the Nashville Technology Council are wrestling with as they try to help businesses in Middle Tennessee find good candidates for nearly 1,200 vacant technology jobs. Although details of the recruiting push are still being determined, it’s a cinch local recruiters will turn to social networking and other digital strategies to reach tech-savvy job seekers. The Tennessean
Submitted 1 years 307 days ago

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Twitter rules at CMA, Bonnaroo music festivals
An estimated 150,000 fans who attended Bonnaroo or the CMA Music Festival went home this week after a four-day celebration of outdoor music, food and drink. What they left behind, however, was a vast trail of virtual clues that will help guide city officials, festival organizers, recording artists, corporate sponsors and advertisers to potentially rethink how they invest in the festivals next year. Interested in the best way to reach fans next year? It may not be Facebook. Twitter was overwhelmingly the social media expression of choice among fans at both festivals. Nearly 95 percent of all CMA Music Festival social media were in 140-character Tweets. At Bonnaroo, Twitter accounted for 91 percent of all mentions. The Tennessean
Submitted 1 years 308 days ago

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Electrolux fortunes in Memphis tied to housing
Keith Grant is a good customer for Electrolux, which plans by 2015 to start making a half-million cooking appliances a year in Memphis. The builder bought 125 of Electrolux's Frigidaire-brand stoves for the new houses he built last year and plans to buy even more in 2012. "They have one of the highest customer-service satisfaction levels of any appliance manufacturer in the country," said Grant, one of the owners of home-construction firm Grant & Co. The Memphis economy has a bigger stake in the home-building industry now that Electrolux is building a plant here. An estimated 1,250 employees will work at its factory in Frank C. Pidgeon Industrial Park. The more new homes that are built, the more new kitchen appliances are sold to equip them and the more secure those jobs are. Memphis Commercial Appeal
Submitted 1 years 308 days ago

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Giles County, Tenn. gets boost from auto supplier; 800 jobs expected
Magneti Marelli, an international auto supply company, said Monday it plans to expand its operation in Giles County, south of Nashville, investing $53.7 million investment and creating 800 new jobs. The expansion will feature a new automotive lighting operation to be housed inside the company’s existing Pulaski, Tenn., facility. Magneti also has lighting division plants in Juarez and Tepotzotlan, Mexico. The company makes headlamps and rear lights for a variety of auto makers. Overall, Magneti Marelli has 83 production units, 11 research and development centers and 26 application centers in 18 countries. The Tennessean
Submitted 1 years 308 days ago

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Swiss Company Fills ‘Missing Link’ for Georgia’s Solar Firms
When Georgia officials heard that a Swiss manufacturer of inverters for the solar power industry was considering setting up shop in the U.S., they acted quickly, hoping the state would be able to attract this “missing link” to its solar capabilities. James Blair, director of foreign direct investment at the Georgia Department of Economic Development and Costas Simouglou, director of Georgia’s Center of Innovation for Energy, decided that Georgia had to go after Sputnik Technology USA Inc., a research and development service provider in the United States for Sputnik Engineering AG headquartered in Biel, Switzerland. Global Atlanta
Submitted 1 years 308 days ago

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Independents are the apple of Allen’s eye in Va. Senate race
George Allen, the odds-on favorite to win Virginia’s GOP Senate primary Tuesday, is already working feverishly to win over the coveted independent vote for a high-stakes November matchup with Democrat Tim Kaine that will help determine the balance of power in the U.S. Senate come January. The former Virginia governor and U.S. senator wrapped up a two-week tour of the state Monday with an appearance at a Northern Virginia business with Gov. Bob McDonnell, who has stressed bipartisanship in his first 2 1/2 years in office and remains one of the nation’s most popular governors. The Washington Times
Submitted 1 years 308 days ago

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Virginia's Warners — Mark and John — reminisce about bipartisanship
Remember when Mark Warner ran for U.S. Senate against John Warner? The slogan, as he loves to remind people, was “Mark, not John.” (No, it really wasn’t a biblical reference, though potential voters asked him). On Monday, the two Warners were together again. Not rivals this time, though. Mark Warner, now a U.S. senator, and John Warner, a retired U.S. senator, headlined a business luncheon hosted by Virginia FREE in Tysons Corner Monday. As you might expect, the two spoke about the need for bipartisanship in an increasingly polarized Washington. The Washington Post
Submitted 1 years 308 days ago

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Kill 'death' tax, keep 'estate' tax
A crisis of tax policy is expected at the end of this year, when a bundle of deferred decisions and bills all come due at once. Tax writers, while grappling with the federal deficit, must also confront a slew of scheduled tax rate increases, as the Bush tax cuts and the payroll tax cuts expire and temporary fixes end. The House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures is due to hold a hearing Friday on how to deal with all these tax provisions. The strangest one is probably the federal estate tax — which Congress voted to kill at the beginning of the century. Its persistence has burdened family-run enterprises and dampened job prospects in the most dynamic sectors of the U.S. economy. Politico
Submitted 1 years 308 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Reshoring manufacturing capacity from primarily Asia to the South and Mexico is now a common thing to do and it's all about money. When China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001, the average manufacturing wage in China's Pearl River Delta (PRD) was about 58 cents an hour.

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Dr. Glen Fenter
Desperation sometimes masks itself in acceptance. Such was the case for Takelia Carter of Marion, Ark. For Carter, the mother of six school-age children in a low paying job, desperation was normative existence. This was her life in Crittenden County, Ark., deep in the Delta where unfortunately one in four families lives well below the poverty level.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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