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Savannah Harbor deepening moves to fast track
With the swipe of a pen late last month, U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Army Jo-Ellen Darcy signed off on the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project, propelling the 15-year effort to deepen the Savannah River channel from the hoping, planning and seemingly endless study phase toward the long-awaited reality of mitigation, contract letting and — finally — digging. Darcy’s “Record of Decision” confirms that the proposed plan is in the nation’s best interest and allows the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which began studying the project’s feasibility in 1999 at the direction of Congress, to move forward with construction. Under the project, the Corps of Engineers will deepen the Savannah River channel from 42 to 47 feet, allowing larger and more heavily loaded container vessels to call on the port with fewer tidal delays. Savannah Morning News
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Consultant hired to develop plans for downtown Louisville bourbon district
Downtown officials have hired a consultant to figure out ways to market and to draw new business to a planned bourbon district centered along Main Street that they envision as a major new tourism draw and an economic-development force. The whiskey industry flourished along Main Street into the early 20th century; the street was long dotted with whiskey-related offices, warehouses and distilling businesses. “The goal is to determine how to establish and build a ‘bourbon experience’ in downtown Louisville, beyond what we currently have,” said Alan DeLisle, executive director of the Louisville Downtown Development Corp., the city’s lead agency on central-business district projects and the group that recently hired the consultant. Louisville Courier-Journal
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Clinton stirs Raleigh, N.C. rally as campaign nears the wire
RALEIGH -- Bill Clinton acted as salesman-in-chief for Barack Obama Sunday, both touting the president’s policies as having saved the country from a Depression, while writing off Mitt Romney’s proposals as the failed “trick-down” economics of the past. The former president said Obama’s policies of investing in public-private partnerships in research, and education, and student loans that have helped fuel the rapid growth of the Research Triangle. “You are going to vote your hopes rather than your fears North Carolina,” Clinton told a crowd in Raleigh’s Pullen Park, that park officials estimated at 4,000. Raleigh News & Observer
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Digital Corridor built on Charleston, innovation
CHARLESTON, S.C. A decade ago, as property values on the Charleston peninsula were skyrocketing, wages based largely on tourism and service industries were nowhere near keeping pace. That problem proved the genesis of the Charleston Digital Corridor, a successful economic development strategy that created a public-private effort growing startup technology companies that could pay higher salaries. "We were risking creating a third-world country of haves and have nots," said Ernest Andrade, who has headed the corridor since its inception in 2001 and said one of the corridor's biggest selling points is Charleston itself. Charlotte Observer
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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North Carolina's coast is 'hot spot' for rising sea levels
State legislators last summer ignored research that shows sea-level rise will accelerate its creep up North Carolina’s coastline this century. This week, waves of science will say they were wrong. Sea level was a hot topic – and North Carolina lawmakers a butt of jokes – as the Geological Society of America began its annual meeting in Charlotte on Sunday, days after Hurricane Sandy swamped New York and New Jersey. Some researchers said the 39-inch rise a state science panel expects by year 2100 may be far too low. Other new studies say North Carolina is part of an Atlantic coast “hot spot” where seas are rising far faster than in the rest of the world. Charlotte Observer
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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It's rural vs. urban on Tuesday in NC
ASHEVILLE — The divide between urban and rural voters in the presidential race is likely to be just as deep as four years ago, when city residents helped elect President Barack Obama in North Carolina. Political scientists say a lower excitement level for Obama, generally, and a “rural backlash” give Romney a slight advantage in the Tar Heel state heading into Election Day. Obama won here by 14,000 votes four years ago. In mostly rural Western North Carolina, just three counties supported him: Buncombe, Jackson and Watauga. Watauga County, according to early voting numbers, is similar to the rest of the state with more Democrats than Republicans voting, but with a narrower margin than in 2008. Asheville Citizen-Times
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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More than 33,000 still without power across West Virginia
CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- More than 33,000 electricity customers in West Virginia remain in the dark nearly a week after Superstorm Sandy buried parts of the state with snow. Most of the remaining outages are in northern and eastern counties served by FirstEnergy. The utility's website says about 32,000 customers were without power Monday morning. The most outages are in Preston County, where 7,725 customers have no power. In southern West Virginia, Appalachian Power reports about 1,500 outages in Fayette County and about 600 outages in Wyoming county. At the height of Sandy, more than one-quarter million customers in West Virginia had no power. Charleston Daily Mail
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Fla. remains tough sell to end for Obama, Romney
TAMPA, Fla. — To the last minute, Florida is proving to be an expensive and frustrating state for President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney alike, seemingly resistant to arguments that play well in Ohio, Colorado and other states. For all the talk of Florida leaning Republican, both nominees are making stops here in the campaign's final 40 hours, a testament to its uncertainty. Their campaigns and allies have poured $130 million into Florida TV ads. Florida is a tough sell for Obama's national message of steady economic recovery, because its unemployment and foreclosure rates remain above the national average. The auto industry bailout ads airing in Ohio would make little sense here. AJC.com
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Southern Co.’s profits rise
Mild weather and lower fuel costs likely saved consumers some money on their utility bills in recent months. But it meant Atlanta-based Southern Co. reported lower third-quarter profits and revenue than expected. Still, net income for the quarter rose to $976 million, or $1.11 a share, compared with $916 million, or $1.07 a share, during the same time a year ago. Operating revenue for the quarter, ending Sept. 30, fell 7 percent to $5.05 billion, compared with $5.43 billion a year ago. “The most significant story of earnings this year so far has been weather,” Tom Fanning, Southern’s chairman, president and chief executive officer, said in an interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. AJC.com
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Georgia Power showcases solar initiative
ATLANTA — Georgia Power isn’t waiting for regulatory permission to show off within the energy industry its plan to triple solar generating capacity. Last week, during the Association of Energy Engineers’ World Energy Engineering Congress meeting in Atlanta, the company outlined a proposal it made in September to take on 210 megawatts of solar capacity. It would replace the same amount of biomass generation that fell through after authorization. The Georgia Public Service Commission has 60 days to consider the request, and the company hopes to begin the program in February. “This is our most exciting time for solar,” said Ervan Hancock, manager of the utility’s renewable-energy program. Athens Banner-Herald
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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