Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
-3
Likes

Galveston Bay oil spill could have lasting effect
GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — Some ecological experts fear the 168,000 gallons of oil spilled a week ago in Galveston Bay and now drifting south in the Gulf of Mexico could have lasting effects on the undersea ecosystem. Antionetta Quigg, a marine biology professor at Texas A&M University at Galveston, said based on previous studies, the oil has been found to be toxic. Fuel Fix
Submitted 1 years 313 days ago

0
Likes

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.
Submitted 1 years 314 days ago

2
Likes

That's The Randle Report for Friday, March 28, 2014
Join us again on Monday morning for all of the American South's business, economic development and political news in real time and in one place. Use the sort buttons or the search window above to find your favorite stories from yesterday, last week, last month or last year. Click on the headline to access Southern Business & Development magazine.
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

44
Likes

Kentucky Fried Fortune: 50 Years Since the Colonel Sold to John Y. Brown
Fifty years ago this March, Kentucky Fried Chicken was just a menu item sold at 600 North American restaurants. The savory supper created by a white-haired Southern septuagenarian in a snow-white suit and black string tie hadn’t yet become the stuff of legend. And had the cornpone character known as Colonel Sanders not sold his chicken-breading blend of 11 herbs and spices to men who built it into a restaurant brand, most anyone alive today might never have tasted it. But thankfully he did, on March 4, 1964, to be exact, and his company, founded in 1952 in Corbin, Ky., is now a $16 billion brand with 18,000 stores in 115 countries. Even John Y. Brown Jr. and Jack Massey, the idealistic pair who bought Sanders out for $2 million (about $15 million in 2014), never foresaw what KFC would become. Business Lexington
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

20
Likes

Southern towns hope to get noticed at symposium
It is the economic development version – on an international scale -- of speed dating. Several communities throughout the Southeast are looking to pique the curiosity of Chinese entrepreneurs during the U.S.-China Manufacturing Symposium here in Dothan, with very little time to do so. Some use a catch phrase. “It’s cool to be rural,” one Alabama mayor said Thursday. Some use raw data – available buildings, square footage and nearby resources. Some use goodies – pens, maps, peanuts and even Alabama and Auburn hats. Several local communities, including the Alabama cities of Dothan, Monroeville, and Thomasville as well as Huntersville, N.C. and the State of South Carolina, had five minutes each to make presentations to symposium attendees Thursday. Dothan Eagle
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

36
Likes

Tesla officials make pit stop in San Antonio, reports
Tesla Motors Inc. officials met with San Antonio city leaders on Wednesday to discuss the possibility of locating a planned $5 billion battery manufacturing plant, the Austin Business Journal reported. Palo Alto, Calif.-based Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) is currently examining sites in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Nevada for the new factory. The electric carmaker may be facing an uphill battle in locating the plant in Texas. During the last Texas Legislative session, lawmakers opted not to change rules that prohibit manufacturers of cars to sell directly to consumers. Tesla officials are not able to even discuss pricing options or offer test drives to consumers in the state. San Antonio Business Journal
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

34
Likes

San Antonio is contender for multibillion-dollar Tesla plant, County Judge Wolff says
There are wild goose chases and sure bets. The likelihood of San Antonio landing a major Tesla Motors Inc. battery factory falls somewhere in between. Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff says San Antonio is now a legitimate contender in the quest to land the Tesla lithium-ion battery facility. Wolff spoke to me in the wake of media reports earlier today indicating that two representatives from the Palo Alto, Calif.-based electric-car maker met with city officials yesterday. “I think we are in the hunt,” says Wolff, who has played a pivotal role in numerous economic development deals, including the successful recruiting effort that brought a Toyota truck assembly plant to the city that now employees roughly 2,800 workers. San Antonio Business Journal
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

34
Likes

BMW to expand by 50%; add 800 jobs; build X7
GREER — BMW made an expected — but still stunning — announcement that it will expand its only U.S. manufacturing plant with a $1 billion investment to increase capacity 50 percent, add 800 jobs and produce a new, larger SUV for the company’s world markets. The Greer assembly plant “was built to enhance and expand the BMW lineup, underscoring the BMW Group commitment to the United States,” said Norbert Reithofer, chairman of the Board of Management, BMW Group. “In addition to the X3, X5, X6, and the new X4, we are today announcing another all-new, larger X model to be manufactured exclusively at this plant for our world markets: the X7. We will expand the plant’s annual production capacity by 50 percent up to 450,000 vehicles by the end of 2016,” Reithofer said. Greenville News
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

5
Likes

Video Gaming Technologies plans major expansion in Franklin, Tenn.
Video Gaming Technologies Inc. is planning to add around 100 employees as it expands its headquarters in Franklin, Doug Edwards, the company’s chief administrative officer, said Thursday. The maker of casino games currently employs around 200 people in Franklin, including those in software engineering, development, design and management. Edwards said the additional employees will primarily be product managers and software engineers. “We built this building to house about 300 people and we have aspirations to get upwards of about 300 this year,” Edwards said. Nashville Business Journal
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

-12
Likes

Caesars confirms Harrah's Tunica will close June 2
Caesars Entertainment Corp. has confirmed it is planning to close Harrah's Tunica, effective June 2. The 2,000 acre, 1,300 rooms plus Harrah's property is the largest casino in Tunica. The company cited continued declines in business, as well as increased competitions for the reasons behind the move. “After exploring every other viable alternative, we have come to the difficult but necessary conclusion to close Harrah’s Tunica in an effort to appropriately position our business for the current market opportunity and ensure the long-term viability of our remaining operations in the vicinity,” John Payne, president of central markets and partnership development, said in a statement. Memphis Business Journal
Submitted 1 years 315 days ago

 

 

 

Most Liked Stories (past 24 hrs.)


Most Disliked Stories (past 24 hrs.)


Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
According to Chinese theory, yin is a passive, negative force and yang is an active, positive force. Chinese philosophers believe that the opposing forces aren't really contradictory. Instead, they are interconnected and complimentary, interacting to create a balance in one's life. 
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
The Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT report was released in the summer quarter. I try to read it every time it comes out since I find it to be the best indicator of child poverty, a statistic everyone involved in economic development needs to be aware of. The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a charity that supports disadvantaged children. 
 


 

 

 http://www.allianceswla.org
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2016 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login