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Will anyone stand by Paula Deen, or is she toast?
LOS ANGELES – Paula Deen established herself as America’s queen of country cooking, buttering her way to an estimated $16 million food empire. But Deen's admission last week that she had used the N-word in the past could cause her empire to crumble faster than a graham cracker crust. Fox News
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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Paula Deen Scandal Continues As Employees Tell Rainbow/PUSH Coalition Of Alleged Discrimination
An attorney for the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition said current and former Paula Deen employees told him the famous cook and her brother discriminated against black employees, one of whom was consistently referred to as "my little monkey." Huffington Post
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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Paula Deen Loses Major Endorsement Deal
ATLANTA — Paula Deen’s troubles intensified on Monday as she scrambled to cope with allegations that she and people in her restaurants have been insensitive or worse to blacks, women and other groups. New York Times
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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CHART OF THE DAY: Home Prices Soar, And Have Their Best Month In The History Of The Case-Shiller Index
This basically needs no explanation. Home prices are soaring. On a year-over-year basis, Case-Shiller home prices surged by over 12.05%. More impressive, the single-month gain of 1.7% was the strongest one-month gain in the history of the entire index. Business Insider
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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Housing Prices Shooting Up Amid Strong Demand And Limited Supply
WASHINGTON — U.S. home prices jumped 12.1 percent in April from a year ago, the most since March 2006. More buyers and a limited supply of available homes have lifted prices in most cities across the country, a sign of a broad-based housing recovery. Huffington Post
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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That's The Randle Report for Monday, June 24, 2013
Join us again tomorrow morning for all of the American South's business, economic development and political news in real time and in one place. Use the sort buttons or the search window above to find your favorite stories from yesterday, last week, last month or last year. Also, click on the Sports tab above for all of the South's sports news in real time. Click on the headline to access Southern Business & Development magazine.
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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Forbes Names New Orleans the Fastest-Growing City Since The Recession
It was widely reported that the Great Recession and subsequent economic malaise changed the geography of America. Suburbs, particularly in the Sun Belt, were becoming the “new slums” as people flocked back to dense core cities. Yet an analysis of post-2007 population trends by demographer Wendell Cox in the 111 U.S. metro areas with more than 200,000 residents reveals something both very different from the conventional wisdom and at the same time very familiar. Virtually all of the 20 that have added the most residents from 2007 to 2012 are in the Old Confederacy, the Intermountain West and suburbs of larger cities, notably in California. The lone exception to this pattern is No. 15 Portland. The bottom line: growth is still fastest in the Sun Belt, in suburban cities and lower-density, spread out municipalities. Forbes
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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ABC's 'Nashville' will remain in Music City
ABC has confirmed that “Nashville” will resume production in Music City sometime next month. Executive producer Steve Buchanan said “Nashville” was “ very excited to be continuing to shoot the show here.” “The city’s an integral and important part of what we are portraying, from the locations that we use around town to the individuals that we are able to involve within the music industry. It’s great that we’re able to continue to portray the city as it truly is.” The filming this past year was estimated to have a $40 million impact on the local economy, and state and city officials have been hopeful that the producers would bring the show back to town for a second season of filming. The Tennessean
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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Alabama cities vie for aerospace jobs
It took a lot to rise above the traffic at the Paris Air Show last week as representatives from 22 American states joined an international throng all working to share their messages and land aerospace jobs. But Alabama had an advantage: It arrived as show darling Airbus was building a major assembly plant in Mobile. House Speaker Mike Hubbard, R-Auburn, said “everyone is aspiring to be like Alabama, which is pretty nice.” Hubbard said he and other state officials “made a lot of good contacts.” “Some of them are looking to leave other states and come to our state,” the speaker said. Gov. Robert Bentley joked Thursday that his feet were still sore from crisscrossing the event to meet with dozens of companies during a whirlwind three-day trip. And the state-level delegation was only one of many Alabama contingents at the show. Montgomery Advertiser
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

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Oklahoma plays large part in drilling revival
It's a future Mike Terry didn't think much about, much less talk about. But as president of the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association, he looks around the state, sees the bustling activity to find and produce more oil and natural gas here and thinks it could happen. Energy independence. "For the first time in my life - and I've been around it almost my whole life - I really believe that energy independence is something that's achievable," Terry said. "I never did think that until just really about the last 12 months." Oklahoma is responsible for a large portion of that production, with hundreds of companies drilling in the major oil and natural gas plays across the state. Tulsa World
Submitted 1 years 342 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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