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Economy Set for Better Times Whether Obama or Romney Wins
Mitt Romney says Barack Obama’s policies will consign the U.S. to an extended period of sluggish economic growth, at best. The president says his Republican challenger’s plans will sow the seeds of another mammoth recession. Both are wrong. No matter who wins the election tomorrow, the economy is on course to enjoy faster growth in the next four years as the headwinds that have held it back turn into tailwinds. Consumers are spending more and saving less after reducing household debt to the lowest since 2003. Home prices are rebounding after falling more than 30 percent from their 2006 highs. And banks are increasing lending after boosting equity capital by more than $300 billion since 2009. Bloomberg
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Obama and Romney Deadlocked, Polls Show
President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney crisscrossed the country Sunday to energize supporters in key states, as new polls forecast a down-to-the-wire election and both sides claimed they had the momentum to win. The Romney camp, combing through surveys taken in the waning days of the campaign, pointed to strength among independent voters, anxiety over the economy and greater enthusiasm among conservatives as signs that the Republican would win, potentially with victories in states such as Pennsylvania and Minnesota that a GOP presidential candidate hasn't carried for decades. Obama aides exuded similar confidence, citing polls showing the president remains resilient in potentially decisive states such as Ohio and Virginia. The campaign's elaborate ground operation, they said, would mobilize Mr. Obama's core set of minority, young and female voters to guarantee an Obama victory. The Wall Street Journal
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Obama, Romney surrogates insist their guy will win. Both can't be right.
Except for religious broadcasting on some obscure cable channels, Sunday morning pre-football TV is all about the nation’s other contact sport: politics. On this last Sunday before 2012’s contentious presidential election, Republican and Democrat campaign surrogates had their game faces on, bluffing and butting heads rhetorically about what Election Day portends. "I'm very confident that, two days out from Election Day, the president's going to be re-elected on Tuesday night," David Plouffe, a White House adviser who managed Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, said on NBC’s "Meet the Press." Over on “Fox News Sunday,” Rich Beeson, Mitt Romney’s campaign manager, was confidently predicting that his man would win 300 electoral votes – far more than the 270 necessary to take the White House. Christian Science Monitor
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Would Tennessee let Kentucky steal Ashley Judd for a U.S. Senate run?
Actress-activist Ashley Judd has made some noise as a Tennessee Democrat this year, attending the Democratic National Convention as a Volunteer State delegate in September and penning a Tennessean op-ed last week calling on controversial Republican Congressman Scott DesJarlais to hang it up. But Huffington Post political analyst Howard Fineman said on “The Chris Matthews Show” Sunday that Judd’s old Kentucky home could be calling her north to run for the Senate from there in 2014. The Democrats’ target would be a big one: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican first elected in 1984. “The Democrats are desperate to beat Mitch McConnell, the icon of Republicanism in the Senate,” Fineman said. “They think they have a candidate in Kentucky to run against him – no kidding, Ashley Judd, who’s from Kentucky, who’s very active politically. They want her. I know they want her. The money people in Kentucky want Ashley Judd.” The Tennessean
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Ingalls adding 5K jobs in Mississippi to fulfill new contract demands
PASCAGOULA, Miss. — Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon says the company will hire more than 5,000 workers over the next two years. Edenzon made the announcement Friday at a career fair that drew more than 1,200 students from six counties. He said Ingalls will be hiring 1,200 people through the end of the year and another 4,000 next year. Most of those are craftsman positions. The increase in demand for workers is attributed to new shipbuilding contracts. Ingalls has enough work to keep employees busy for the next few years and the company also has bid on a contract for another five destroyers. Clarion-Ledger
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Should Science Majors Pay Less for College Than Art Majors?
Philosophy lovers, prepare to be outraged. Down in Florida, a task force commissioned by Governor Rick Scott is putting the finishing touches on a proposal that would allow the state's public universities to start charging undergraduates different tuition rates depending on their major. Students would get discounts for studying topics thought to be in high demand among Florida employers. Those would likely include science, technology, engineering, and math (aka, the STEM fields), among others. The Atlantic
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Job forecast looking up for La.
The future employment outlook for Louisiana has changed, thanks to a booming petrochemical industry and continued growth in the healthcare sector. From 2010 to 2020, the number of jobs in the state is projected to increase by 13.6 percent, growing from just under 2 million jobs to 2.25 million jobs, according to Curt Eysink, executive director of the Louisiana Workforce Commission. That compares with the 8.1 percent growth projection the state had forecast through 2018 just last year. “This is very positive,” Eysink said. “The Louisiana economy underperformed the region and the nation for a long time.” The Advocate
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Drillers drawn to rocks around Eagle Ford, too
A few years ago, Glenn Hart of Houston-based Laredo Energy said he was “kind of enamored” of the Eagle Ford Shale. The company in 2009 had started drilling exploratory wells on 130,000 acres north of Laredo, and Hart's attitude about the other geologic bands of rock that lie atop the Eagle Ford was this: They were standing between him and the Eagle Ford and needed to be drilled through quickly to get to the real payday. Then a geologist came into Hart's office with data that indicated that some of those other formations had as much potential as the Eagle Ford. Hart was skeptical. “I basically said, ‘Get out of my office.'” San Antonio Express-News
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Texas a battleground for church and state issues
CEDAR PARK, Texas—Texas might not be a battleground state in the upcoming presidential election, but it is home to a number of fights — some ongoing and some already decided — that could have a bearing nationally on the place of God in government. National advocacy groups have focused much of their efforts in Texas, most recently over Hays County commissioners opening their meetings with prayer, the Cedar Park Police Department putting a cross on its chaplain’s seal and Kountze High School cheerleaders carrying Christian signs at football games. Austin American-Statesman
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

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Startup Memphis: Get your geek on in the Bluff City
Geeks rule! At least for a week — and that would be this week — with the inaugural Memphis Geek Week that continues through Saturday. The brainchild of LunaWeb founder Dave Barger and a host other local tech aficionados, the movement is dedicated to creating and nurturing tech talent in the Bluff City. That's vital for numerous reasons, such as strengthening our entrepreneurial ecosystem by providing startups and other businesses with tech-savvy and skilled workers. A creative cycle that generates talent while at the same time attracting it produces economic benefits for the entire community. And that should bring out the geek in all of us. Memphis Commercial Appeal
Submitted 1 years 349 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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