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That's The Randle Report for Wednesday, June 18, 2014
Join us again tomorrow morning for all of the American South's business, economic development and political news in real time and in one place. Use the sort buttons or the search window above to find your favorite stories from yesterday, last week, last month or last year. Click on the headline to access Southern Business & Development magazine.
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Chinese paper plant to employ 2,000 in Chesterfield, Va.
A Chinese-owned company that makes paper is locating a plant in Chesterfield County, Governor Terry McAuliffe announced this morning, and expects to create 2,000 jobs by 2020. Shandong Tranlin Paper Co., Ltd., a leading Chinese pulp and paper company will invest $2 billion over five years to establish its first U.S. advanced manufacturing operation in Chesterfield County, McAuliffe said. He said Virginia successfully competed against several other states for the project. Tranlin said in a news release that the company will use its proprietary technology "to produce tree-free, non-chlorine bleached, 100% straw paper products made exclusively from organic agricultural field waste such as wheat straw and corn stalks." It said the facility "will push the frontiers of organic agriculture in the U.S. by converting the residuals from its paper manufacturing process, known as black liquor, into humus-based organic fertilizer" that will be supplied to farmers and home owners throughout the U.S. Richmond Times-Dispatch
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Ky. Gov. Steve Beshear slams Mitch McConnell, Obamacare critics
WASHINGTON – Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and other critics of the federal health care law are being "disingenuous" by attempting to be for a state program that is no different from Obamacare, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear charged Tuesday. Beshear said the state health care exchange, called kynect, has been "highly successful," enrolling 421,000 Kentuckians — with 75 percent of them receiving coverage for the first time. "That's life-changing for them, and it's transformative for our state," the Democrat governor told a Washington conference sponsored by Enroll America, a nonprofit, nonpartisan group whose mission is to expand health care coverage across the nation. Louisville Courier-Journal
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Big Fish Keep Alabama's Economy Humming
A little over 20 years ago, the state of Alabama bowed up. Instead of fishing for economic development projects with a can of worms, a cane pole and a bream hook, as the state had done for years, Alabama officials decided it was time to go to the tackle box and break out some bigger lures. Amazingly, those lures and that change in strategy captured a project that to this day remains one of the most prestigious economic development deals ever made in the South. Alabama landed German automaker Mercedes-Benz and its first manufacturing venture into North America. The world was stunned by the German automaker's decision, particularly officials in North Carolina, the bridesmaid for the project. Since the Mercedes deal was one of the first economic development projects we covered -- pre-Internet, by the way -- I poured over the coverage in newspapers and other publications. Few do this anymore, but my office back then received over 50 newspapers a day. That's how we got our business news just a little over 20 years ago for this magazine. I know, crazy. SB&D
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Tunica Reels as Competition, Recession Hit Casinos
TUNICA RESORTS, Miss. - It was 3:30 p.m. on a Monday in May at Harrah's Tunica Hotel & Casino in northwestern Mississippi. Gamblers were few in number, and dealers stood ready at idle card tables. It was easy to see why Caesars Entertainment Corp. was giving up on the 136,000-SF casino floor - the largest between New Jersey and Las Vegas. Harrah's closed June 2 - 18 years after it first opened as the Grand Casino. The Tunica Miracle - as boosters called the coming of gambling to what had been an isolated, economically moribund slice of the Mississippi Delta - is over. A boom that peaked with 13,000 jobs has slid into a struggle for survival. Arkansas Business
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Gulf Breeze, Fla., company recognized for job creation
Gov. Rick Scott recognized the Gulf Breeze software company AppRiver on Tuesday for its commitment to creating jobs in northern Florida. During a meeting of the Florida Cabinet, the governor gave App River and three other companies the Governor's Business Ambassador Award. Each month, the award is given to businesses that have excelled in creating jobs and opportunities for Florida families. AppRiver employs about 200 people and provides email and web security solutions to businesses of all sizes. The company has sustained a 93 percent customer retention rate while protecting 8.5 million mailboxes for more than 47,000 companies worldwide, a news release from the Governor's Office said. Pensacola News Journal
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Port Canaveral chief: Huge but attainable growth
Port Canaveral Chief Executive Officer John Walsh knows the numbers seem unreal to some. But he insists they can come true. Walsh predicted Monday that the port's economic impact will reach $20 billion a year in 10 years, and the port will be responsible for 50,000 jobs in the area. That's more than five times the port's current economic impact on the region of $3.5 billion a year and nearly triple its current job impact of 17,000. Walsh made these bold predictions during his annual State of the Port address at the port's Cruise Terminal 6. Florida Today
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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The ultimate in flipping - the Savannah-built G650
Want a Gulfstream G650? Be prepared to wait. The next available slot for delivery of Gulfstream Aerospace’s Savannah-built flagship business jet is years down the road. So Gulfstream executives are neither surprised nor concerned to see “pre-owned” G650s — currently price-tagged at about $64.5 million — selling for upwards of $70 million. In fact, the company says it is happy customers are able to get value from their aircraft. “There are some customers who have been able to sell their aircraft and actually command a premium price for it,” Steve Cass, Gulfstream’s vice president for marketing, told UK-based Internet publisher Corporate Jet Investor recently. “That’s terrific, we’re happy for them,” he said. “It’s really not impacting our sales efforts.” Savannah Morning News
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Federal agency cancels Redskins trademark registration, says name is disparaging
The United States Patent and Trademark Office has canceled the Washington Redskins trademark registration, calling the football team’s name “disparaging to Native Americans.” The landmark case, which appeared before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, was filed on behalf of five Native Americans. It was the second time such a case was filed. “This victory was a long time coming and reflects the hard work of many attorneys at our firm,” said lead attorney Jesse Witten, of Drinker Biddle & Reath. Federal trademark law does not permit registration of trademarks that “may disparage” individuals or groups or “bring them into contempt or disrepute.” The ruling pertains to six different trademarks associated with the team, each containing the word “Redskin.” The Washington Post
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

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Study: $10.10 minimum wage would cost Georgia 21,460 jobs
Hiking the minimum wage in Georgia from the federal floor of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour, which some have advocated, would cost the state more than 21,000 jobs, a new study done for the Georgia Restaurant Association says. Women would be hardest hit, losing 12,700 of those jobs, according to Trinity University labor economist David Macpherson who used U.S. Census Bureau data and followed methodology employed by the Congressional Budget Office when it estimated the impact of wage increase. The hardest-hit group age-wise would be people 21 and under, the study determined. Most of the job losses would be in the retail or leisure and hospitality industries, with individuals holding only a high school degree or less the most affected. Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Submitted 1 years 346 days ago

 

 

 

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
According to Chinese theory, yin is a passive, negative force and yang is an active, positive force. Chinese philosophers believe that the opposing forces aren't really contradictory. Instead, they are interconnected and complimentary, interacting to create a balance in one's life. 
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
The Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT report was released in the summer quarter. I try to read it every time it comes out since I find it to be the best indicator of child poverty, a statistic everyone involved in economic development needs to be aware of. The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a charity that supports disadvantaged children. 
 


 

 

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