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Bonnaroo bound! With not one 4-day pass left, organizers of 4-day fest welcome 80,000
As cars zipped toward Manchester from Nashville along Interstate 24 around noon on Wednesday, it seemed hard to imagine that 80,000 people would soon make their way onto the 650-acre farm that hosts Bonnaroo, one of the country’s top outdoor music festivals. It wasn’t until reaching the exits with the Waffle Houses and Starbucks did the telltale festival signs appear — straw fedoras, tie-dyed shirts and colorful bandanas. Around 9:20 a.m. Tuesday, the 2013 Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival sold out of its general admission tickets for the third year in a row, said AC Entertainment’s Ashley Capps. VIP tickets sold out earlier than that. Capps took reporters on a tour of the grounds the day before the official start of the festival, which begins today and runs through Sunday. The mayors of Manchester and Coffee County were there to help kick off the tour and talk about the festival’s $51 million economic impact on the area. The Tennessean
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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Texas on the radar for retiring baby boomers
The beaches, the Hill Country and top medical facilities might be reasons enough to retire in Texas. But the lack of a state income tax propelled Texas to the No. 2 spot on “The Top States for Boomers to Live” report released by Newsmax magazine in its June issue. The magazine factored in things such as reasonable home prices, economic health and cost of living in selecting the states. It also considered taxes, job opportunities, the climate for business, crime and weather. The top spots to attract baby boomers are: Houston Chronicle
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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Funding to Improve Rural Electricity in Oklahoma, Arkansas
OKLAHOMA CITY - US Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced grants and loans intended to improve the reliability of electricity in rural areas of Oklahoma, Arkansas and 14 other states. The projects announced Wednesday include nearly $6.9 million for Ashley-Chicot Electric Cooperative Inc. in Arkansas to build 83 miles of distribution lines and make system improvements. Another project includes an $82.4 million loan to Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Inc. in Anadarko to build and improve 78 miles of transmission line, two substations and other system improvements. Arkansas Business
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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Spotlight on Oklahoma switches from positive to grim, but shouldn't change the long-term image of the area
Oklahoma has benefitted from its share of good publicly in recent years, including a stint in the NBA Finals and one of the strongest local economies during the recent recession. For the past few weeks the state has returned to the national spotlight, this time with images of danger and destruction from a series of deadly tornadoes. The national coverage has threatened to damage the state's improving reputation. “Overall, it's certainly not helpful to growing our economy or to our outside view, but I don't think there's any long-term negative affect,” Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett said. “We've established our own identity over the past few years. I don't think we're branded by tragedies like we once were. Our brand has improved such that the weather events don't overshadow the other events we've highlighted and promoted.” Before the growth of the past decade, most people who had never been to Oklahoma thought of the state only in light of tornadoes, “The Grapes of Wrath” and the Oklahoma City bombing, Cornett said. The Oklahoman
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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India's Apollo Tyres to buy Cooper Tire; Tupelo plant should stay open
Apollo Tyres Ltd. whose main market is in India is buying Ohio’s Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. for $2.2 billion and making a commitment to maintain the company’s three U.S. manufacturing plants and retain its management operation in Ohio, Cooper’s chief executive said Wednesday. Cooper Tires opened a plant in Tupelo in 1984 that employs some 1,200 people and is one of the area’s largest employers. India’s Apollo Tyres Ltd. said Wednesday that the combined company will be one of the world’s largest tire makers, with a strong presence across four continents and combined 2012 sales of $6.6 billion. Its tire brands include Apollo, Cooper, Roadmaster and Vredestein. The deal gives Apollo access to markets in the U.S. and China while Cooper gets a premium price per share and some assurances that its domestic operations won’t be gutted. Clarion-Ledger
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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North Carolina Is the New Wisconsin
“Outsiders are coming in and they’re going to try to do to us what they did to Scott Walker in Wisconsin,” North Carolina Republican Governor Pat McCrory said yesterday, in response to the growing “Moral Monday” protest movement. North Carolina is the new Wisconsin, but not for the reasons McCrory alleges. Like in Wisconsin, a homegrown grassroots resistance movement has emerged—and grown rapidly—to challenge the drastic right-wing agenda unveiled by Republicans in the state. Just like the Koch brothers backed Scott Walker, the Koch’s billionaire ally and close associate Art Pope funded North Carolina’s Republican takeover in 2010 and 2012. (Only McCrory went a step further and actually named Pope to his inner circle as deputy budget director.) And North Carolina, like Wisconsin, is “a state fight with national implications,” says Rev. William Barber of the North Carolina NAACP. Republicans have imported a slew of ALEC-inspired policies in an attempt to turn the New South back into the Old Confederacy. The Nation
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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Fewer in S.C. delegation, more meetings planned for Paris Air Show
South Carolina is sending fewer representatives to Europe’s biggest aerospace expo than in years past but has more meetings planned with companies considering expansion in the state. The 16-member delegation has 80 scheduled meetings during next week’s Paris Air Show, S.C. Commerce Secretary Bobby Hitt said during a teleconference Thursday morning. The group won’t include Hitt or Gov. Nikki Haley, but that’s because the company get-togethers this time are more working meetings than “meet-and-greets,” Hitt said. “This is a good sign,” the former BMW executive said, noting many of the meetings are with preexisting prospects. “This is what we think is the normal gestation of what occurs.” Post and Courier
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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Nassau County, Fla., cheers Crawford Diamond getting "mega" designation
State Sen. Aaron Bean turned to Gov. Rick Scott and told him Nassau County is so passionate about job creation “that we will go into the deep woods and celebrate under a tent if it means bringing jobs.” Bean’s description captured the scene Tuesday morning at Crawford Diamond Industrial Park, which covers about 1,800 acres of forest in west Nassau County where CSX and Norfolk Southern rail lines intersect. Scott joined U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, state lawmakers and county officials as they hailed McCallum Sweeney Consulting’s designation of Crawford Diamond as a “mega industrial park.”
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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Space firms gear up for Brevard Co., Fla., operations
Three companies competing to fly astronauts to the International Space Station expect to increase their local activity in the second half of this year, executives said Tuesday. The Boeing Co. soon will start moving into a former shuttle hangar at Kennedy Space Center, where it will assemble a test article of its CST-100 capsule. SpaceX hopes to launch a pad-abort test of its Dragon capsule in December from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, after potentially several more Cape rocket launches. And Sierra Nevada Corp., developer of the Dream Chaser mini-shuttle, plans to staff a local office this year to prepare for future flight operations. “Everything we need is in place here,” said Dan Ciccateri, chief systems engineer for SNC Space Systems, during a panel discussion at the National Space Club Florida Committee’s monthly meeting in Cape Canaveral. Florida Today
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

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Space Florida says launchpad is like airport
WASHINGTON — In trying to sell the idea of building a new rocket pad in Central Florida, Frank DiBello doesn't make comparisons to "Star Wars," "Star Trek" or moon landings. Instead, the head of Space Florida relies on a more earthbound analogy: airports. "It ought to be compared to a commercial-aviation field," DiBello said of plans to develop a 150-acre launch complex near Kennedy Space Center, just 3.5 miles west of the rural town of Scottsmoor and 4.5 miles from heavily traveled Interstate 95. His implication: Rocket launches are becoming routine, and the need to establish launch sites miles from human habitation — in case the rocket blows up — is over. Orlando Sentinel
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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