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Venezuelan pharmaceutical company seeks incentives for 100 jobs in Tamarac, Fla.
A pharmaceutical manufacturing company in Venezuela is seeking $500,000 in public incentives to open a facility in Tamarac with 100 workers. The company’s name is being kept confidential for now, as the county dubs it “Project Monodose.” It would make a $50 million investment to purchase, renovate and equip a 135,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Tamarac. The 100 jobs would pay an average annual wage of $49,555. South Florida Business Journal
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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Want a Job? Be a Construction Worker
Charles Cork is gearing up to do something he hasn't done in four years: Build a $1 "I don't think getting a client for this one will be too much trouble," said Cork, principal of home builder Braxton Homes in Scottsdale, in the Phoenix area. His willingness to build is a sign of the confidence being shown by many home builders in the United States as the housing market continues to show signs of recovery. The Fiscal Times
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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POLITICO Playback


Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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The Biggest Threat to the Jobs Recovery
Spring hasn’t officially arrived yet, but the economy sure seems to be in bloom. Housing prices are climbing. The $16 trillion in net worth lost by American households during the Great Recession has officially been regained. Increasingly confident consumers are spending, and borrowing, more. Business spending has picked up after a lackluster end to 2012, too. Blue-chip stocks have reached all-time highs – and then kept right on going, rising to even higher levels. The Fiscal Times
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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Austin City Council approves economic development agreement for National Instruments
National Instruments Corp. will receive about $1.7 million over the next 10 years from the city after Austin City Council members unanimously approved an economic development agreement with the company at their March 7 council meeting. Mayor Lee Leffingwell said the agreement is good for the city and will make money for the city in the long run. Community Impact
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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Questions mount on MetLife incentives deal
FIVE DAYS LATER, McCRORY STILL SILENT ON ROLE IN METLIFE DEAL: Five days after the MetLife jobs announcement, Gov. Pat McCrory and the governor's office remains quiet on what role he played in luring the company even as questions mount. Consider this lead sentence from AP story Friday: "Gov. Pat McCrory avoided questions Friday about the state offering MetLife Inc. $94 million in tax breaks and other incentives to move thousands of jobs to North Carolina and using his former employer to help broker the deal." The Friday announcement was the second time in two days that McCrory dodged reporters' questions. The governor appears at the Department of Environment and Natural Resources today for a 12:30 p.m. announcement. Will he break his silence? The News & Observer
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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Company up for incentives to bring 250 jobs to Davidson County, NC
Davidson County commissioners are considering spending up to $2 million in economic incentive grants and appropriations, to an unidentified company looking to invest near three existing lumber companies in Thomasville, the Lexington Dispatch reported. Winston-Salem Journal
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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The tea party member of the Ted Turner clan
BEAUFORT, S.C. -- If you’re focused on the political differences between tea-party congressional contender Teddy Turner and his CNN-founder father, then maybe you’re missing the point. They have far more in common than dad’s 10-year, third marriage to Jane Fonda might suggest. Like his billionaire sire, the man who would thwart the revival of former Gov. Mark Sanford’s public career has an entrepreneurial bent that has pushed him from discipline to new discipline – this first attempt at politics included. Robert Edward Turner IV likewise has inherited his dad’s do-gooder streak. He’s spent the last four years teaching high school economics. His three marriages match his dad’s record. AJC.com
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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Editorial: Proceed cautiously with Olympics bid for Dallas
The Olympic Games can be a bottomless pit into which host cities throw all their money. Or, if managed well, the Games can mean modest profits and put the host city on the map as a desirable international destination. Faced with these two potential outcomes, Dallas needs to answer the big question at hand: Should we bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics? Our city is one of 35 around the country invited to submit proposals to the U.S. Olympic Committee. Make no mistake, this would be a long shot — and an expensive one at that. The last U.S. city to win a Summer Games bid was Atlanta, for the 1996 Olympics. Chicago lost its bid for the 2016 Games despite President Barack Obama’s personal lobbying and has already decided to forgo a 2024 effort. Dallas Morning News
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

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At Austin's SXSW, Shaquille O’Neal searches for next big tech startup
Brace yourselves, Austinites. We’re in for a Shaq attack. Former NBA superstar Shaquille O’Neal will be in town this weekend as part of South by Southwest, teaming up with Tout – a smartphone app that enables users to record and share quick video snippets – to find the next big tech startup. After reviewing 15-second “elevator pitches” submitted by SXSW attendees, he’ll select one company to make a face-to-face presentation. Done right, the startup could walk away with O’Neal as an advisor – or even as an investor. “I’m a big tech geek,” O’Neal, who graduated from Cole High School in San Antonio, told the American-Statesman. “I’m a nerd. I’m always looking for the next big thing.” Known for his social media savvy, O’Neal was among the first big-name celebrities to start using Twitter, which introduced itself to the world at SXSW 2007. Austin American-Statesman
Submitted 2 years 19 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Just look around at what's happening in the aerospace industry in the American South. Aerospace is really making a move to become one of the region's top two industry sectors. It’s not there yet, but if large project counts are any indication, aerospace may soon challenge the petrochemicals sector as the second largest industry in the region. Never before has the aerospace industry been so important to the South's economy. Oh, what's the No. 1 industry sector in the South? Automotive is, of course. That industry hasn't been challenged much for 25 years in this region, or since we’ve been counting.

 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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