Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
0
Likes

Fracking Can Be Done Safely, but Will It Be?
Out of sight (and smell), natural gas slowly bubbled up into Norma Fiorentino’s private water well near the town of Dimock in northeastern Pennsylvania—in the heart of the new fracking boom in the U.S. Then, on New Year's Day 2009, when a mechanical pump flicked on and provided the spark, Fiorentino's backyard exploded. She and many others blame the blast on fracking—the colloquial name for the natural gas drilling process that combines horizontal drilling and the fracturing of shale deep underground with high-pressure water to create a path for gas to flow back up the well. Scientific American
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

0
Likes

Impact of Louisiana School Voucher Ruling Beginning to Show
The ramifications of a state Supreme Court decision radically disrupting school funding in general and Gov. Bobby Jindal's voucher program in particular began to become clear Wednesday. As the 2013-14 funding plan boomeranged between the Legislature and the state board of education, the state education superintendent revealed that the state had to find an extra $29 million for the current school year; meanwhile, parents of students in the voucher program rallied to keep their kids enrolled. Times-Picayune
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

0
Likes

More Questions Than Answers From Monthlong Investigation Of West, Texas Fertilizer Explosion
While the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (AFT) has concluded its excavation of the site where a fertilizer plant exploded in West, Texas, killing 15 and injuring hundreds, it has yet to determine the cause of the accident, officials announced on Thursday evening. Potential causes thus far include criminal activity, a problem with its 120 volt electrical system, or an old golf cart located on the premises. They have ruled out the ignition of anhydrous ammonia or smoking as potential causes. Think Progress
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

0
Likes

How Tennessee Plans to Solve Its IT Problems
Every government struggles to keep up with technology innovations these days. Blame budgets. Blame project management. Blame the talent. Regardless of the reasons, it is important to keep employees and their skills up to date -- that's what Tennessee learned after a number of failed IT projects. As a result, the state re-envisioned its workforce. Governing.com
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

0
Likes

Out to lunch
The Randle Report is breaking for lunch and making way for a new editor shift. Click on the headline above to access Southern Business & Development's Web site for more detailed information on economic development in the South. Posts will resume at 1:30 pm CDT.
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

10
Likes

VIDEO: POLITICO Playback


Politico
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

0
Likes

Metal Shards and Much Worse In Your Food? What Happens When the Food Industry Regulates Itself
Was Jose Navarro, a federal poultry inspector who died two years ago at the age of 37, a victim of increasingly noxious chemicals used in poultry and meat production? Chemicals like ammonia, chlorine and peracetic acid that are frequently employed to kill aggressive bacteria in meat and poultry? Alternet
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

0
Likes

Bipartisan House group comes to tentative immigration agreement
A bipartisan group of Representatives reached a tentative deal on immigration reform, a proposal that’s expected to be introduced as legislation in June. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., told reporters that the House version will differ “in a lot of areas” from that of the Senate, but the agreement is an important first step in a “a very difficult process.” Salon
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

4
Likes

EAT YOUR AUSTERITY SPINACH!
So the other day Paul Krugman had a long, very good piece in the New York Review of Books on the arguments and flawed research used to justify austerity measures, and why the notion that it’s necessary for countries to “pay” for booms and expansionary fiscal policy with spending-slashing measures in the midst of recessions has so much appeal to certain elites. And in this month’s New Republic, former editor Michael Kinsley responds to Krugman’s anti-austerity crusade with a very poorly argued piece about how even though austerity has been a disaster basically everywhere, austerity is still a Good Thing because we Deserve It. Salon
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

0
Likes

Duke Energy shuts down Harris reactor near Raleigh
Duke Energy Progress has shut down the Shearon Harris nuclear plant after discovering corrosion and signs of cracking in in a nozzle in the vessel head for the nuclear reactor. Charlotte Business Journal
Submitted 2 years 16 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

 http://www.allianceswla.org
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2015 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login