Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
0
Likes

Out to lunch
The Randle Report is breaking for lunch and making way for a new editor shift. Click on the headline above to access Southern Business & Development's Web site for more detailed information on economic development in the South. Posts will resume at 12:30 pm CDT.
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

8
Likes

POLITICO Playback


Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

-4
Likes

Job Creation Under Democratic Presidents Roughly Double That Of GOP: Report
Democrats sure know how to create jobs, if recent history is any indication. Since John F. Kennedy was elected president in 1961, job growth under Democratic presidents has outnumbered that under Republicans by a nearly 2-to-1 margin, according to a Bloomberg Government analysis. During that period, non-government payrolls grew by almost 42 million jobs under Democratic presidents, compared to 24 million when a Republican party member was in power. The pattern seems to be holding true under President Obama. During the first three years and two months of his presidency, the country hasn't lost nearly as many jobs as during that same first period of his predecessor, according to an analysis from left-leaning and Nobel Prize winning economist Paul Krugman. In April, the total number of private sector jobs finally surpassed that which existed when Obama took office in January 2009, according to the Bloomberg Government report. The Huffington Post
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

4
Likes

Why China's Slowdown Could Be Good for US, Europe
China’s economy may be on track to grow at its slowest pace in a decade, but there’s a silver lining to this: lower commodity prices may actually benefit the U.S. and Europe, just when they most need it. “The U.S. might not be in too bad a shape because it would benefit form cheaper commodity and oil prices,” Frederic Neumann, HSBC’s Co-Head of Asian Economic Research told CNBC on Monday. While there may be “severe headwinds” for the global economy if the Chinese government did nothing to stimulate growth, the impact will be uneven on different parts of the world, Neumann said. CNBC
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

-7
Likes

Rush Limbaugh and the Hall of Famous Missourians: Mount Rush-more it’s not
Rush Limbaugh reportedly called his Democratic critics “deranged” and hugged a bronze bust of himself during his induction Monday into the Hall of Famous Missourians. “They’re deranged,” the conservative talk radio host said about opponents of his induction, according to The Associated Press. “They’re literally deranged.” Politico
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

-2
Likes

Paul: I can't win the GOP nomination
Ron Paul hinted at it Monday, but today the Texas congressman confirmed something the campaign has never explicitly said before: He cannot win the GOP presidential nomination. But in a convention strategy memo that followed up on his statement Monday about his campaign plans, Paul clarified the mission and shed more light than ever before on his intentions and expectations for the Republican National Convention. Politico
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

-4
Likes

Alabama’s best ideas? State Legislature seems incapable of developing new, modern ideas
Alabama legislators have a long history of ignoring the will of the people and listening instead to the voice of a few. This year’s classic example is the way House Speaker Mike Hubbard, R-Auburn, has held up a popular bill that would allow the creation of low-cost spay/neuter clinics. This bill would lower costs to taxpayers — who fund animal shelters — reduce the dog and cat population and create competition (which is what all good capitalists want). But a few veterinarians got the speaker to sit on the plan, so it likely will not get back to the floor for a vote. So much for what the people want. Anniston Star
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

15
Likes

Chattanooga draws experts for high-speed Internet projects
Andrew Abumoussa thinks he's found a use for all the inane info posted by over-sharers on Twitter and Facebook, and by end of the summer he hopes to get $100,000 for his idea. At one point or another, most every social media user has read a tweet about their friend's love of their new outfit or their cousin's unkickable case of the sniffles and thought, 'Who cares?' Abumoussa is banking on clothing manufacturers or health industry workers caring, so he and his partners at Scenedipity Intelligence are creating a way to aggregate and deliver that information. Chattanooga Times Free Press
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

Georgia schools face more cuts
Walker County Schools officials say they had no choice but to lay off about 50 teachers this year as Georgia continues to tighten the reins on education funding, leaving local school systems to make grim choices on what public education in the state will look like. Districts statewide have or are determining how to take on their share of $1.14 billion in austerity cuts for fiscal year 2013. In place since 2003, those cuts have left deep holes in schools' pocketbooks. Collectively, public education in Georgia has missed out on $5.5 billion in funding since 2003 because of the General Assembly's austerity cuts. Chattanooga Times Free Press
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

AMR pilots see $130 million savings from U.S. Air merger
(Reuters) - The lead labor negotiator for AMR Corp pilots said a merger between AMR (AAMRQ.PK) and competitor US Airways (LCC.N) could save $130 million a year in cuts to bankrupt airline's pilots' union. Neal Roghair, testifying in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan, said a merger would lower to about $240 million the projected annual cuts from the Allied Pilots' Association, which represents 10,000 pilots at American Airlines' bankrupt parent.
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Reshoring manufacturing capacity from primarily Asia to the South and Mexico is now a common thing to do and it's all about money. When China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001, the average manufacturing wage in China's Pearl River Delta (PRD) was about 58 cents an hour.

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Dr. Glen Fenter
Desperation sometimes masks itself in acceptance. Such was the case for Takelia Carter of Marion, Ark. For Carter, the mother of six school-age children in a low paying job, desperation was normative existence. This was her life in Crittenden County, Ark., deep in the Delta where unfortunately one in four families lives well below the poverty level.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

http://www.cldlink.org
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2014 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login