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Nine States Least Likely to Legalize Gay Marriage Anytime Soon (All Southern States)
Recently, the journey of marriage equality continued with three more states legalizing same-sex marriage -- bringing the total to nine U.S. states allowing gay marriages. But the uphill battle continues -- specifically with some hard-headed states that are going to take a lot more time to realize their wrong ways with not legalizing marriage for all. The marriage momentum is there. In November, Maine, Maryland and Washington became the first states to legalize same-sex marriage through popular vote. In December, Washington legalized some of its first marriages. Maine legalized same-sex marriage on Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012 and Maryland will on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, respectively. Huffington Post
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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Missouri loses $468M in uncollected sales tax
(AP)KANSAS CITY, MO. — Missouri loses about $468 million per year in uncollected sales tax on purchases made over the Internet, according to researchers at the University of Missouri Truman School of Public Affairs. The state misses the money in part because it hasn’t signed onto a 1999 agreement to simplify and encourage voluntary collection of sales taxes by e-commerce retailers, The Kansas City Star reported. Only about half of the states have signed the agreement. The Northwestern
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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Audit finds Jacksonville incentives process has lack of compliance, costing city thousands
A new audit shows companies that received financial incentives to create jobs in Jacksonville did not always bring the jobs they promised. The audit of the Jacksonville Economic Development Commission, later replaced by the Office of Economic Development, found problems with accuracy in business reporting in four of the 11 (or 36 percent) incentive agreements tested. One example presented in the independent audit report was for a company that agreed to create 200 jobs by the end of 2006, but reported that 185 created. The audit found only 180 jobs were actually created and the negative impact to the city was $54,478. Jacksonville Business Journal
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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Business incentives, OK, but smarter ones for North Carolina
Incentives are under a bright national spotlight thanks to a recent New York Times series, which found state governments collectively spend over $80 billion per year on business attraction and retention. This money, which usually comes in the form of generous tax breaks, is offered at the expense of essential public services, including education. Without the incentive offer, it is presumed that corporations would locate their facilities elsewhere, taking precious jobs and purchasing power with them. The News & Observer
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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Banks and Builders: Can 2012’s Winners Keep Rallying?
To have really outperformed the market in 2012, you had to believe firmly in two related concepts at the beginning of the year. First, you needed to have conviction that the housing market had hit rock bottom, as the data was suggesting at the time. Second, you had to believe that the financial stocks that had contributed to or caused (depending on your personal opinion) the real estate market’s plunge and the financial crisis also were poised for a rebound. The Fiscal Times
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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Business Leaders Say Cliff Deal Won’t Create Jobs
A day after Congress managed to avert the fiscal cliff, business leaders warned that the agreement will hurt sales and hiring, won’t unlock investment and leaves the economy riddled with congressionally imposed land mines for months to come. The Washington Post
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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Fiscal Cliff Deal: What It Means for the Economy
Wall Street analysts responded to the fiscal cliff deal with a mix of optimism and disappointment. The deal, which raises tax rates on the rich and allows the two-year payroll tax holiday to expire, won’t cripple the economy, they largely agree, but it also won’t do much to unleash stronger growth this year and beyond – and it still leaves businesses, consumers and investors faced with plenty of uncertainty. Here, a round-up of economists’ reactions to the fiscal cliff deal. The Fiscal Times
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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Louisiana cemeteries sinking, washing away due to coastal erosion
Leeville, La. (AP)— As a young adult, Kathleen Cheramie visited her grandmother's grave in a tree-lined cemetery where white concrete crosses dotted a plot of lush green grass just off Louisiana Highway 1. Now, the cemetery in Leeville is a skeleton of its former self. The few trees still standing have been killed by saltwater intruding from the Gulf. Their leafless branches are suspended above marsh grass left brown and soggy from saltwater creeping up from beneath the graves. NBC News
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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McCrory offers bleak assessment of North Carolina economy
DURHAM With the campaign behind him, Gov.-elect Pat McCrory gave a somber assessment of the state’s economy on Wednesday and warned that the fix would not make everyone happy. “We have some problems,” McCrory told business leaders at an economic forum in Durham. “The fact of the matter is our brand of incredible economic prosperity has been diminished a little bit here in North Carolina. ... We have to own up to it.” Charlotte Observer
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

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CEO stands behind controversial Mississippi Power plant in Kemper County
DEKALB — In the woods of east Mississippi, a subsidiary of Atlanta-based Southern Co. is pouring billions of dollars into construction of a power plant that burns coal but would emit less carbon dioxide. It’s a response to looming federal limits on carbon emissions as regulators try to curtail global warming. Clarion Ledger
Submitted 2 years 22 days ago

 

 

 

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Just look around at what's happening in the aerospace industry in the American South. Aerospace is really making a move to become one of the region's top two industry sectors. It’s not there yet, but if large project counts are any indication, aerospace may soon challenge the petrochemicals sector as the second largest industry in the region. Never before has the aerospace industry been so important to the South's economy. Oh, what's the No. 1 industry sector in the South? Automotive is, of course. That industry hasn't been challenged much for 25 years in this region, or since we’ve been counting.

 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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