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Unions, the Affordable Care Act and the middle class
I am writing as a concerned citizen, a voter, and as the leader of UNITE HERE Local 8 on behalf of thousands of our members who live, pay taxes and work as housekeepers, cooks, servers and dishwashers in Washington’s airports, hotels, stadiums and event facilities. Seattle Times
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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Houston revels in its rise to the top
Lindsay McClelland wasn't expecting to like Houston when she moved here in February. She had visited the city only once, and what she knew of Houston wasn't good: oppressively hot, fast-food everywhere, an inactive populace and a flat, faceless terrain. Houston Chronicle
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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Weak U.S. durable goods data dims growth outlook
Orders for long-lasting U.S. manufactured goods recorded their biggest drop in nearly a year in July and a gauge of planned business spending on capital goods also tumbled, casting a shadow over the economy early in the third quarter. The report on Monday added to other data for July on industrial production, housing starts and new home sales that have suggested economic growth this quarter will probably not accelerate as much as economists had hoped. The Fiscal Times
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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Analysis: Floridan Aquifer can only handle 6% more pumping before serious environmental harm
Just how much more water can Central Florida pump from the Floridan Aquifer without causing real harm to the region's environment? After years of debate, study and anxiety, state authorities say they have finally — and officially — figured it out. The answer: hardly any. Orlando Sentinel
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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How Republicans Will Take The Senate (Or Not)
The battle for the Senate is primed to go down to the wire. Democrats can lose up to five seats while retaining the majority—assuming Cory Booker wins October's special election in New Jersey—but the party is threatened by members facing tough races in the Deep South and other conservative states. Already, races for three Democratic-held open seats (Montana, South Dakota, and West Virginia) are favoring Republicans, and Sen. Mark Pryor is looking in tenuous shape in Arkansas. National Journal
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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Out to lunch
The Randle Report is breaking for lunch and making way for a new editor shift. Click on the headline above to access Southern Business & Development's Web site for more detailed information on economic development in the South. Posts will resume at 1:30 pm CDT.
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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VIDEO: POLITICO Playback


Politico
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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Poof! Your Job Is Now Freelance, Part-time, No Benefits
Watch closely: I’m about to demystify the sleight-of-hand by which good jobs were transformed into bad jobs, full-time workers with benefits into freelancers with nothing, during the dark days of the Great Recession. Alternet
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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Who Are the Long-Term Unemployed?
It's been over four years since the recovery officially began, but there are still over four million people who are long-term unemployed. That's four million people who can't find work even after looking for six months or more -- four million people who can't even get companies to look at their resumes anymore. The Atlantic
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

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St. Louis radio station pulls adds featuring Gov. Perry
Gov. Rick Perry is calling on businesses in a number of states to consider Texas’ more friendly business environment. Folks in some of those states are pushing back. San Antonio Business Journal
Submitted 2 years 8 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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