Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
9
Likes

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam signs 'gateway sexual activity' bill
Gov. Bill Haslam’s office on Friday said that he has signed legislation that adds the concept of “gateway sexual activity” to the state’s abstinence-first sex education curriculum. Haslam signed Senate Bill 3310 over calls to veto the measure from the American Civil Liberties Union and others. The measure says that sex education teachers cannot encourage “gateway” activities that stop short of sexual intercourse. Opponents argued that the law contains murky definitions that would make it difficult for teachers to discuss subjects frankly. Proponents said the measure was needed to clarify the meaning of abstinence. The Tennessean
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

9
Likes

SunTrust’s Rogers Says JPMorgan Loss ‘Black Eye’
JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM)’s $2 billion loss on synthetic credit securities bolsters the case of banking critics pushing for tighter regulations on proprietary trading, SunTrust Banks Inc. Chief Executive Officer William Rogers said. “It is a black eye for the industry,” Rogers said in an interview with Bloomberg Television’s “In the Loop” from Atlanta. “It would certainly embolden those on the Volcker side of that equation,” referring to the so-called Volcker rule setting restrictions on trading. Bloomberg
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

3
Likes

Missouri lawmakers a step closer to passing economic development bill
JEFFERSON CITY -- Missouri lawmakers are getting closer to passing legislation that could help prevent failures of economic development projects, such as the Mamtek sweetener plant project in Moberly. The proposed new mandates come after construction of the Mamtek factory halted last fall when the company missed a payment on $39 million in bonds issued by the city. Mamtek's failure was the subject of multiple investigations and calls for accountability by lawmakers during last year's special session. But seven months later, the bill is taking its final steps through the legislature with much less fanfare. Kansas City Star
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

8
Likes

EDGE fund has been a winner for Oklahoma
LAWMAKERS never have a shortage of ideas of how to spend other people's money. In this case, we're talking not only about taxpayer dollars but about a special fund established five years ago. The Economic Development Generating Excellence (EDGE) endowment fund isn't a cookie jar to be raided but a long-term investment that must be maintained. The EDGE story is worth repeating, not only for the sake of the newer occupants of NE 23 and Lincoln, but also because it's a trajectory of excellence that all Oklahomans can be proud of. Daily Oklahoman
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

5
Likes

With prudent policy, W.Va. dodged a bullet
Thanks to high demand for its coal, West Virginia was spared the worst of the recession. That — and careful policy — made this one of the few states that did not have to borrow from the federal government to maintain its unemployment insurance fund. Other states were not as prudent. In 2009, the Legislature raised the premium for unemployment compensation to cover the first $12,000 of employees' wages. That was up from the first $8,000. At the same time, lawmakers provided for freezing benefits at 2008 levels until the trust fund had a year-end balance of $220 million. Legislators also agreed to transfer a $40 million surplus from the state Insurance Commission to the unemployment fund. Charleston Daily Mail
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

7
Likes

Unemployment rate doesn't paint full picture of job market
The government had just announced a drop in the unemployment rate, but the reader wasn't buying it. He believed officials were fudging the numbers to fool an unwitting public. "The government has manipulated how they count the unemployed," he wrote in an email. "Since I don't currently receive unemployment checks, I'm not counted. There are plenty of others like me." Orlando Sentinel
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

1
Likes

Still firing away wildly at Cuba and hitting Florida
Gov. Scott may be a contemporary regulation-hater, but when it comes to Cuba, gasoline still sells for about 30 cents a gallon, and The Beatles still are playing Hamburg, West Germany. Last week, the governor traveled to Miami to sign a bill that supposedly prevents the state or any local government from doing business with a company that does at least $1 million worth of business with Syria or Cuba. Forget that the governor signed House Bill 959 before a delegation that included Syrians. This bill is all about Cuba. To Gov. Scott, every regulation is a weed to be pulled from the lawn of business. Yet the governor signed a bill that could kill Florida jobs. It is a sop to Cuban exiles and their patrons who have frozen U.S. policy toward the island for 53 years. Palm Beach Post
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

6
Likes

Poll shows Obama’s chief edge is enthusiasm factor
Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Obama are statistically tied with 43.6 percent and 43.2 percent support, respectively, among likely voters surveyed in the first head-to-head matchup conducted for The Washington Times/JZ Analytics poll, which nonetheless found more enthusiasm for the president’s campaign than for the GOP’s challenger. The survey, taken Friday and Saturday of 800 likely voters, found both men winning their own partisans, and gave Mr. Romney a slight edge among independents. The Washington Times
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

3
Likes

SC governor pays a visit to race track
DARLINGTON — S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley’s first trip to Darlington Raceway included touring the race hauler of last year’s winner Regan Smith, sitting in the driver’s meeting near NASCAR legend Cale Yarborough and meeting her new favorite driver, Danica Patrick. “We love this race. The state has been waiting for this,” Haley told NASCAR driver Clint Bowyer outside his motorhome. “We appreciate you having us,” Bowyer replied. Haley walked around the garage area before the Bojangles’ Southern 500 greeting race fans, signing autographs and posing for pictures. “It’s a great day for the race,” she told well- wishers. The State
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

0
Likes

Top 9 reasons Congress is broken
Congress, hovering at barely 10 percent approval in national polls, is empirically gridlocked: More than halfway through its term, the 112th Congress has approved just 106 bills, versus 906 in the actual "Do Nothing Congress" of 1947-48 – and is filled with such rancor that moderates such as Sen. Olympia Snowe (R) of Maine are fleeing the place. Nearly three dozen D.C. insiders recently gathered at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars to discuss why. Christian Science Monitor
Submitted 1 years 337 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Reshoring manufacturing capacity from primarily Asia to the South and Mexico is now a common thing to do and it's all about money. When China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001, the average manufacturing wage in China's Pearl River Delta (PRD) was about 58 cents an hour.

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Dr. Glen Fenter
Desperation sometimes masks itself in acceptance. Such was the case for Takelia Carter of Marion, Ark. For Carter, the mother of six school-age children in a low paying job, desperation was normative existence. This was her life in Crittenden County, Ark., deep in the Delta where unfortunately one in four families lives well below the poverty level.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

 http://www.allianceswla.org
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2014 Randle Report
All of the South's Business News, Political News, and Economic Development News in One Place
Login