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Rock Hill’s Bleachery developers to unveil plans Monday
We will learn Monday what Sora Development has in mind for the initial redevelopment of the Bleachery site outside of downtown Rock Hill. Charlotte Business Journal
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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Peco Foods To Operate Poultry Complex In Batesville, Arkansas
Peco Foods Inc., a family-owned business with processing plants, hatcheries, and feed mills located in Alabama and Mississippi, contracted to acquire the physical assets of a Batesville, Arkansas, poultry complex owned by Townsends, Inc. and subsidiaries. Area Development
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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Austin Begins To Show Us What Broadband Competition Was Supposed To Look Like
As we've stated more than a few times, so many of the problems that plague Internet and telecom markets could be remedied if we simply had healthy competition between broadband operators. Net neutrality, for example, would rarely be a problem in a market where broadband ISPs were seriously afraid that their subscribers could actually leave. However, what most markets usually have is "wink wink, nod nod" non price competition between two incumbent operators (if you're lucky), with little to no incentive to excel on price or service -- or even upgrade the network or improve customer service. techdirtcom
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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Why Your Broadband Is So Bad That Netflix Has To Pay For Special Access
Netflix customers will get faster and more reliable access to streaming video after Netflix agreed to pay cable and broadband giant Comcast in exchange for direct connection to Comcast’s network. But while the deal solves customers’ sluggish streaming issues, it reveals how little Internet service providers (ISPs) are doing to keep up with a rapidly changing Internet. Think Progress
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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The Broadband Trusts
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, many of America’s first large-scale industrial corporations snapped up competitors and made liberal use of political connections to build monopolies and near-monopolies in critical emerging sectors, like long-distance rail transportation and the oil and gas business. These “trusts” aimed to increase their pricing power, and they often succeeded. And the rise of the trusts also prompted a fierce political backlash. Right now, there is a widespread conviction that we are living in a parallel moment, and the idea isn’t totally crazy. Specifically, the broadband sector, which is arguably as important to a communication- and consumption-centric economy like our own, in which a chief source of innovation is a wave of cloud computing start-ups, is dominated by a strikingly small number of firms, and that number may well shrink. National Review
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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America's 10-Year Experiment in Broadband Investment Has Failed
Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, announced Wednesday that there would be new rules written to guarantee net neutrality. It’s a good thing any website can reach any person unimpeded by tolls, and it’s good that Wheeler still wants to make this possible. The Internet service providers will first work to dilute the new rules, of course, and then sue to overturn them. Entire legal departments, lobbying outfits, and public-relations firms live for this moment, the beginning of a now-familiar three-year grind with the FCC. Businessweek
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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Democratic Sen. Landrieu Walks A Fine Line In Red Louisiana
If Democrats are going to keep their majority in the Senate, they'll need to hang on to a few critical seats they hold in conservative states. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana has one of those, and like some of her colleagues up for re-election, her support of the Affordable Care Act could be the mountain to overcome this fall. The question for Landrieu is: Will Louisiana voters define her by Obamacare, or judge her on the entire record she's built over nearly two decades as a senator? NPR
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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Why Obama loves trade and Democrats hate it
President Obama hates inequality and loves manufacturing. Today, he's hosting an event touting the creation of two new hubs designed to boost manufacturing in the Chicago and Detroit areas. So it's a real pickle why he wants to pass sweeping trade deals with Asia and Europe. Economists have found that offshoring has savaged the American manufacturing industry and widened inequality. It's that concern that has driven the top Democrats in Congress, including Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, to block Obama's trade agenda -- opening a major rift in the party ahead of the mid-terms. Washington Post
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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Tax incentives for job destroyers?
The people at Good Jobs First are out with an update to their nifty subsidy tracker, which makes it easy to figure out the dollar value of incentives granted to companies by state and local governments over the years. Guess who's on top? Boeing, which has received $13.2 billion, driven primarily by gigantic tax abatements from Washington State -- even as the company moved more and more jobs away. Washington Post
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

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25 maps and charts that explain America today
At the start of every year, government agencies, think tanks and businesses release sets of data and reports charting the nation’s social, economic and demographic course. Individually, each release of data offers a narrow snapshot of a narrow issue — voter attitudes, migration, unemployment, an assessment of policies, etc. — but collectively they tell a broader story. In just the first two months of the year, we here at GovBeat have already written dozens of posts looking at the state of the nation in maps and charts. Here are some highlights that explain who we are and how we live today (with links for those who want more): Washington Post
Submitted 1 years 353 days ago

 

 

 

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
According to Chinese theory, yin is a passive, negative force and yang is an active, positive force. Chinese philosophers believe that the opposing forces aren't really contradictory. Instead, they are interconnected and complimentary, interacting to create a balance in one's life. 
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
The Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT report was released in the summer quarter. I try to read it every time it comes out since I find it to be the best indicator of child poverty, a statistic everyone involved in economic development needs to be aware of. The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a charity that supports disadvantaged children. 
 


 

 

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