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Road tolls to pay for Texas high-speed rail planning – what a concept!
According to a Star-Telegram article (“North Texas puts up more high-speed rail money”), $4.5 million (through year 2018) raised from collected highway tolls will be put toward planning for a proposed Dallas-Fort Worth high-speed rail connector. It should be noted that the Dallas-to-Fort Worth corridor is independent of Texas Central Railway’s planned system, which proposes to connect the Texas cities of Dallas and Houston together on about 240 miles of track, with trains reaching speeds of at least 205 miles per hour, the distance between those two cities covered in a proposed 90 minutes’ time. Population by 2040 in the Dallas Metroplex region is expected to grow to ten-and-a-half-million residents. A 2040 population similar in size to that of the Dallas area’s is likewise expected for Houston as well, information in the same source revealed. Scienceblog.com
Submitted 3 hours ago

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TEX Rail plans include high-tech approach to safety
A proposed commuter rail line from downtown Fort Worth to Dallas/Fort Worth Airport will be among the first rails in Texas to feature state-of-the-art technology for preventing crashes, an official said. The TEX Rail line, which officials said is on schedule to open by late 2018, will be designed to include a system called positive train control, a Fort Worth Transportation Authority official said. Star-Telegram
Submitted 4 hours ago

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Why Can't the United States Build a High-Speed Rail System?
Virtually every wealthy nation in the world has invested in a high-speed rail network—with the striking exception of the United States. From Japan to France, even from Turkey to Russia, trains travel through the country at speeds of 150 miles per hour or above, linking city centers and providing a desirable alternative to both air and automobile travel. Meanwhile, outside Amtrak's 28 miles of 150-m.p.h. track in rural Massachusetts and Rhode Island, the American rail network is largely limited to speeds of 110 m.p.h. or less. There are few reasons to think the situation will change much in the coming decades. So why has the United States failed to fund and construct high-speed rail? Citylab.com
Submitted 4 hours ago

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Another Argument for a Minimum Wage Hike: It Could Reduce Smoking
Here’s an optimistic take on the power of boosted wages: A new study shows that raising pay can cut down on smoking rates. In a study published in the Annals of Epidemiology, Paul Leigh, professor of public health sciences and researcher with the Center for Healthcare Policy and Research at the University of California, Davis, and Juan Du, assistant professor of economics at Old Dominion University, drew a decade’s worth of data from a national, longitudinal study of socioeconomics and health. Citylab.com
Submitted 4 hours ago

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We Are Living in the Era of Job Gentrification
The tennis star Venus Williams just earned a business degree from Indiana University East. Now let’s hope she doesn’t come for your job. The way the workforce is shaping up, employers are increasingly hiring people with college degrees for jobs that don’t require college-degree skills. John Cassidy took a look at why this is happening in his article “College Calculus” in this week’s New Yorker. Citylab.com
Submitted 4 hours ago

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Yes, Women and Minorities Are Making Strides in the Labor Market, But ...
Attempts to remedy America’s dauntingly long history of racial and gender inequity can, at times, feel slow and incremental. That’s why when it comes to narrowing the economic disparities between certain groups, it’s important to celebrate progress—more minorities graduating from college, more female executives, a shrinking gender-wage gap. Those are all certainly good things, but sometimes, dwelling on these achievements means missing the underlying failures that allow inequity and division to persist, and grow. The Atlantic
Submitted 4 hours ago

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The Workers Whose Paychecks Are Shrinking
Since the recession officially ended in 2009, Americans have watched the economy slowly improve: More people are back to work, unemployment has decreased 4.9 percentage points from its height, and economic growth is slowly increasing, up 2.4 percent in 2014. But there are those who haven’t seemed to benefit much from these gains. A recent report from the National Employment Labor Project (NELP) found that for workers in the lowest-paying jobs things have actually gotten worse. The Atlantic
Submitted 4 hours ago

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NC No. 5 Clean Energy Jobs Creation
WASHINGTON, DC - The national nonpartisan business group Environmental Entrepreneurs released its latest quarterly clean energy jobs report on Thursday which showed showed nearly 10,500 clean energy and clean transportation jobs were announced nationwide between April and June, 2015. Ncnn.com
Submitted 4 hours ago

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80,000 Businesses Receive Manufacturing Help From Maker's Row
Love may be too mushy a word for a gritty manufacturing mindset to embrace. But I cannot help it: I love Maker’s Row and what this business is doing for American manufacturers and our economy. This site, with its new Made in America E-commerce store, and a mission to assist designers, makers, inventors, and other product-centric businesses, connects you with factories across the USA and offers a lot to, well, love. Forbes
Submitted 4 hours ago

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18 Numbers That Show Why American Workers Really Need a Break This Weekend
Labor Day, a federal holiday since 1894, “is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers,” according to the U.S. Department of Labor. It’s always celebrated on the first Monday of September, unofficially marking the end of the summer with a most-welcome three-day weekend for (most) workers. We thought it would be the perfect time to gather some research to sum up how American workers are faring. Here’s a statistical portrait of the American workforce. TIME
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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
The belief that "80 percent of all new jobs come from existing business and industry" is an out-of-date, old-fashioned fabrication. I have no idea how it started, where it started, or who said it first, but there are professionals in economic development as well as leaders of government in the South who actually believe that each year, 80 percent (why 80 percent I don't know, either) of all new jobs are created by existing business and industry. I hear it all the time and I just roll my eyes. There is nothing static in economic development but this: 100 percent of all lost jobs come from existing business and industry. That, and of course 100 percent of the time site consultants never pay for a meal.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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