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Animal rights group settles lawsuit with Vienna, Va.-based Ringling
WASHINGTON - An animal rights group will pay Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus $9.3 million to settle its part of a lawsuit stemming from claims the circus abused its elephants. The circus company's owners announced the settlement with the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals today. The animal rights group was one of several that in 2000 sued the circus' owner, Feld Entertainment Inc., claiming elephants were abused. Courts later found that the animal rights activists had paid a former Ringling employee to bring the lawsuit and that the man didn't have the right to sue the circus. Richmond Times-Dispatch
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Republicans Are Making It Very Clear They're Going To Pursue Another Debt Ceiling Fight
Two Republican Senators began to signal today that they will attempt to frame negotiations around an increase in the debt ceiling, potentially creating a situation early next year that would mirror the crisis of the summer of 2011. Business Insider
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Amazon signs lease for site at Alliance TX
Amazon.com, which settled a multimillion-dollar sales tax lawsuit with the state this year by promising to invest heavily in Texas, has quietly signed a lease with Hillwood for a 68-acre site in Haslet in the sprawling Alliance development. The Seattle-based online retailer is also proceeding on a second North Texas site, in Coppell, in a deal with a separate business entity operated by Ross Perot Jr., the owner of Hillwood. Star-Telegram
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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CHART OF THE DAY: America's Stuff Is Getting Really Old, And That's Bullish
Barry Ritholtz points us to Businessweek's chart of the day, and it's a bullish one. Businessweek's David Wilson notes that the "average age of cars, appliances, and furniture owned by U.S. households is at its highest in almost half a century." In other words, Americans are increasingly likely to have to purchase and replace these goods some time soon as they get more and more worn out. That's bullish for spending, jobs, and the economy as a whole. Business Insider
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Everything You Know About The Deficit Is Wrong — And Fixing It Will Be Painless
People who insist that the US has a gigantic "spending problem" are ignorant of what really drives the deficit and the national debt, as Henry Blodget easily demonstrated in a series of charts. Business Insider
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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New transit system could roll into Miami Beach
Nearly a decade after a project to connect Miami Beach and the mainland by light-rail fizzled, city leaders may hire a state-owned Spanish railway company to study a new option to link the tourist hub of South Beach to Miami. Miami Beach public works staff met this month a second time with representatives of FEVE, which runs a 777-mile rail system in Spain, to talk about an electric streetcar free of overhead wires that the company runs in the historic city of Seville. Miami Herald
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Health of George H.W. Bush 'improving'
Former President George H. W. Bush remained in the intensive care unit of a Houston hospital on Friday, but "continues to improve" and his exchanges with medical staff now include singing, according to a statement from a Bush family spokesman. Reuters
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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East Coast ports strike averted
A looming East and Gulf coasts ports strike was averted Friday morning as shippers and longshoremen decided to extend talks for 30 days. Atlanta Journal Constitution
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Deltona official: New prospects could add 1,000 jobs
DELTONA — Hard hit by the recession and housing collapse, Deltona could see several prospects add 1,000 or more jobs inside the city limits, with further details expected next month, said Jerry Mayes, the city's economic development administrator. news-journalonline.com
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Workers Expect Higher Pay, Job Growth in 2013
The unemployment rate may still be sitting at elevated levels, but workers are optimistic about their paychecks and employment opportunities in the new year. According to a new survey conducted by human resources services firm Randstad, more than half of respondents (57%) expect to get a raise in the New Year--a 10% increase from last year. What’s more, 59% of employees think the job market will improve in 2013. Fox News
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

 

 

 

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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