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USAgencies announces new headquarters in downtown Baton Rouge
The former Capital One building in downtown Baton Rouge will soon become the USAgencies building. Times-Picayune
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Chattanooga among fastest growing cities coming out of the recession
Chattanooga was among the leading cities in economic growth coming out of the recession, according to a study released today. Chattanooga Times Free-Press
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Will Mary Landrieu Engage the 'War on Women' in the Louisiana Senate Race?
There isn’t much to see driving south on Evangeline Throughway through Lafayette, Louisiana besides a few dilapidated houses and, at the intersection with 10th Street, a bright red billboard. A photo of Senator Mary Landrieu in a red jacket, her blond hair swept across her forehead, fills its right side. “100% pro-abortion voting record,” the billboard reads, and directs passerby to a website titled “Too Extreme for Louisiana.” The Nation
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Can North Carolina's Latinos Help Democrats Hold the Senate?
Hispanic voters may be a rising force in American politics, but they will be all but invisible in most key Senate races this year. For all the talk after 2012 of the growing group's political importance, Latinos are concentrated in specific states, and they just happen to be ones that don't figure into this year's battle for the Senate. Even so, in one important, closely divided campaign, some Democrats see a big opportunity with this relatively tiny group. National Journal
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Where Cities Are Growing Faster Than Their Suburbs
Where is growth happening in America: cities or suburbs? For much of the last half-century, growth was a suburban phenomenon. But over the past decade or so, many have noted the comeback of cities and the urban core—a phenomenon Alan Ehrenhalt dubs “the great inversion.” In fact, the question of where growth is centered—in cities or suburbs—has emerged as one of the great dividing lines in the debate over urban America’s future. Citylab.com
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Maybe Those EPA Rules Aren’t Quite Such a Big Deal
Forget the bluster from fossil fuel groups and coal state representatives. And don’t pay so much attention to the administration’s bragging. The Environmental Protection Agency’s new rule about carbon pollution from power plants isn’t that stringent. That’s why major environmental groups, though pleased to see the new rule, are quietly pushing the Administration to make it even stronger before it becomes final. The planet, they say, can’t wait for progress. The New Republic
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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A Conservative Showdown in Oklahoma
There’s another round of primaries Tuesday, and most of the attention will focus on Mississippi’s Republican Senate runoff (which we’ll look at in later story). But there are a number of other intriguing races, the most important of which is the Republican Senate primary in Oklahoma. Here’s what you should know about the face-off in the Sooner State. Fivethirtyeight.com
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Are we in for an oil shock?
prepare to pay more at the pump, says Alen Mattich at The Wall Street Journal. As the "seemingly endless conflict" in Iraq escalates, some investors are wondering whether we're headed toward an oil price shock and how that might hinder "what looks to be a widespread — if still very subdued — recovery from the financial crisis." While we're not in shock territory just yet, prices are climbing, and that does not bode well for many global economies. The Week
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Existing home sales up 4.9%; best gain since '11
Existing home sales rose for the second straight month in May — climbing to their strongest pace since fall — as an increased number of homes on the market helped draw buyers. USA Today
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

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Internet Regulation Will Slow Manufacturing Growth
Manufacturers are innovation leaders. They leverage technology in every aspect of their business. It is in their products, their processes, and pervasive throughout their enterprise. All types of technology including software, sophisticated machines, and especially the internet have led to unprecedented growth in the manufacturing sector. Unfortunately, we continue to see more calls for regulation of the internet that if answered will only hinder manufacturing growth. Shopfloor.org
Submitted 2 years 100 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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