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Crovitz: The Economics of Immigration
For the first time in a generation, the debate over immigration has turned to the opportunities, not the burdens. Washington might finally deliver immigration reform, especially as politicians realize that adding more skilled workers is the fastest way to boost the economy and avoid a fiscal crisis. Wall Street Journal
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Rural Dominance in Missouri's Legislature
One of the more fascinating legislative patterns I've watched over the decades has been the dominance of rural Missouri in the state's General Assembly -- particularly in the Senate. Back four decades ago, rural legislators firmly were in control.
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Jones: Governor taking bipartisan approach
ATLANTA — The news in Gov. Nathan Deal’s press conference Thursday wasn’t just that he was supporting a relaxing of HOPE collegiate scholarship eligibility, it was also that he was adopting a position advocated a day earlier by Democrats in their own press event. Athens Banner Herald
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Tornado tears through southern Mississippi
At least seven Mississippi counties are trying to recover from a tornado that touched down Sunday, leaving widespread damage and at least 16 injured. So far, no one has been reported killed. CNN
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Texas v. California
Texas Gov. Rick Perry will be making a head-hunting expedition to the Golden State next week. Which apparently is just fine by California Gov. Jerry Brown. "Everybody with half a brain is coming to California," Mr. Brown quipped. "So Texas, come on over!" The Democratic governor may have been poking fun at his Republican counterpart, but the joke is on him. Wall Street Journal
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Why Some State Incentives for Business Work—And Others Don't
Every state does it, to one degree or another: pays incentives to private companies to keep jobs in-state. Supporters say this is necessary for job creation, detractors call it corporate welfare, and nationwide it costs more than $80 billion a year. So when are such incentives sound economic policy, and when do they merely serve certain firms, lobbyists and politicians? Wall Street Journal
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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China Steps Up Buying in U.S.
The deals getting the green light so far are smaller. Last week, U.S. regulators approved the Chinese acquisition of a U.S. battery maker despite political resistance and an initially icy reception. Wanxiang America Corp., a unit of China’s Wanxiang Group, is paying $257 million to buy A123 Systems, AONEQ -3.57% a U.S. government-backed maker of lithium-ion batteries, after an early attempt at a purchase collapsed. Wall Street Journal
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Future is bright for development in Oklahoma City's Plaza, MidTown districts
The Oklahoman's Steve Lackmeyer fielded questions on Oklahoma City development during his weekly online chat with readers Friday on NewsOK.com. This is an edited version of that conversation. The Oklahoman
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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Texas Power Giant Could Be Split Up
Energy Future Holdings Corp., the struggling Texas power company involved in a record leveraged buyout, could end up splitting as it faces significant choke points on debt and seeks counsel from Wall Street restructuring advisers. Wall Street Journal
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

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NASA awards $1.9B contract to Jacobs Technology Inc. of Tullahoma, Tenn.
TULLAHOMA, Tennessee -- NASA has awarded a major engineering services contract for its Johnson Space Center in Houston to Jacobs Technology Inc. of Tullahoma, Tenn. The contract, potentially worth $1.9 billion, with be managed in Houston. al.com
Submitted 2 years 146 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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