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China is at it again; now it's auto parts
China is once again trying to take another industry away from America. This time it is the auto parts supplier industry. China has spent billions of dollars heavily subsidizing its auto parts supply industry. Jobs in the car manufacturing and America auto parts supply industry include metal parts, cabin components, cardboard containers and paper, fluids and chemicals, electronic software, plastic, rubber and tires, to name a few products produced in America. These parts are made right here in America. The auto parts suppliers provide good-paying jobs that support our families, build the tax base in our communities and make our nation stronger. We as Americans can’t let China take more jobs from the American market. Call your congressman today and ask them to help put trade tariffs on the Chinese auto parts supply industry. Anniston Star
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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Drilling for an alternative: U.S. needs new sources for clean, renewable energy
“Drill, baby, drill” and “drill here, drill now,” two favorite chants of conservative populists, take on a different meaning when the “here” of oil and gas drilling is in your own backyard. Oh, sure, to supporters of these policies drilling is fine when confined to some frozen tundra in Alaska or an offshore rig a distance from the shore. As The Star’s Patrick McCreless has reported, much of Alabama’s national forests is being made available to oil and gas drillers. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management recently posted notice that drilling rights on 43,000 acres of federal land in Alabama will soon be available for lease. The vast majority of those sites are in the Talladega National Forest, meaning our backyard. The parcels up for lease are disturbingly close to the Pinhoti and other hiking trails, bodies of water, Cheaha State Park and other natural assets. Anniston Star
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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Winston-Salem-based BB&T enjoys tranquil shareholders meeting
BB&T Corp. reaped at Tuesday's annual shareholders meeting what it has sown during the financial crisis — tranquility reflecting confidence in its conservative, profitable strategy. Unlike Wells Fargo & Co.'s shareholders meeting Tuesday, which required a police presence to handle Occupy Wall Street protesters, BB&T's meeting featured no overt criticism of management. Kelly King, BB&T's chairman and chief executive, fielded two innocuous questions following his 50-minute presentation on the bank's financial strength. "I believe the lack of criticism is an affirmation of our efforts," King said. King said — and analysts agree — that BB&T has managed the financial crisis as well as any large regional bank. BB&T has had 21 consecutive profitable quarters, matched only by US Bancorp and M&T Bank. Winston-Salem Journal
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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Benefits to expire for N.C.'s long-term jobless
About 18,000 long-term unemployed people in the state are expected to lose their unemployment benefits early next month as a result of North Carolina’s declining unemployment rate. Larry Parker, a spokesman for the state’s Division of Employment Security, said the state expects to receive official notice from the U.S. Department of Labor soon. “It will be sometime in early May,” he said. “Usually when we get that notice it’s a two- to three-week timeframe that they (unemployed) have left.” Charlotte Observer
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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Charlotte's The Vue condo highrise headed toward foreclosure
The Vue’s new owner has started foreclosure proceedings on the luxury residential high-rise in uptown, according to court documents filed Tuesday. New York-based Northwood Investors paid about $100 million to take control of the complex in early April, according to Real Estate Alert, a trade publication. The project’s developer, MCL Cos. of Chicago, defaulted on a $195 million construction loan in February 2011, Real Estate Alert has reported. Insurers Mitsui Sumitomo of Japan and Munich RE of Germany sold the junior portion of the loan, with a balance of $130 million, to Northwood for about $42 million. Charlotte Observer
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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GE CEO Immelt says electric car disappointment will fade
DETROIT (Reuters) -- General Electric Co. CEO Jeff Immelt said people "may be disappointed in the adoption of the electric vehicle," but his company will continue investing in battery technology to reflect its confidence in an eventual uptick. Speaking today during an automotive conference in Detroit, Immelt -- whose company is a key supplier to automakers producing electric cars -- said GE is "committed to long-term development" of alternative-fuel vehicles. The executive shrugged off the perception that electric cars are just novelties and said the industry needs to find solutions to cost and infrastructure challenges. Automotive News. For more information on the South's automotive industry, go to www.SouthernAutoCorridor.com.
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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80 jobs are added in Western Kentucky
A platform-trailer manufacturer in Western Kentucky will add 80 jobs with an expansion in Cadiz. Gov. Steve Beshear announced the $3 million investment by Transcraft Corp. The company is building a 12,000-square-foot painting center and buying new equipment as part of the expansion. The company has been approved for tax incentives up to $2 million. Cadiz Mayor Lyn Bailey said Transcraft has created more than 300 jobs. Louisville Courier-Journal
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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Kentucky Derby 2012 | Bob Baffert likes workout by Liaison
Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert said he liked what he saw from Liaison enough during a gallop on Tuesday at Churchill Downs to say he was certain for the Kentucky Derby. On Wednesday, the son of Indian Charlie pleased his trainer again. With Shaun Bridgmohan in the irons, Liaison worked six furlongs in 1:12.80 and had a strong gallop over a track that was labeled as good. “I thought he worked pretty well,” Baffert said. “He’s a very lazy horse, and I didn’t have any company for him. Shaun was really getting after him. It was a really good work over this racetrack and he really didn’t get tired.” Louisville Courier-Journal
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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In run-up to Kentucky Derby, committee to examine drug use in horse racing
Even Congress will be marking the Kentucky Derby, in its own way. Next Monday, five days before the United States's biggest annual horse race, a House health subcommittee will examine the use of performance-enhancing drugs in the sport. "Horseracing is a $40 billion industry that generates roughly 400,000 domestic jobs nationwide," a hearing notice stated. "Many question whether the widespread use of performance enhancing drugs on race day is threatening the viability, safety and integrity of the sport." The Hill
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

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British deploy GOP’s economic plan, return to recession
When he became prime minister of Great Britain two years ago, Conservative Party leader David Cameron began to implement an economic strategy much different than that pursued here in the United States under President Obama. Cameron and his chancellor of the exchequer, George Osborne, decided that Plan A was to cut cut cut. They would cut their way to economic growth by slashing government spending by more than 20 percent across the board. Other aspects of their plan may sound familiar as well. Just last month, they announced that they would be cutting the top tax rate for Britain’s richest households while raising taxes on those who collect pensions, a proposal dubbed “the granny tax” because of its impact on the elderly. Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Submitted 2 years 97 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

In growth, companies find themselves in the dilemma of identifying capital to increase capacity and managing opportunity cost where capital may be deferred. This dilemma is amplified as capacity constraints drive a company to complete the site selection process for an expanding or new facility. 
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Dr. Glen Fenter
Desperation sometimes masks itself in acceptance. Such was the case for Takelia Carter of Marion, Ark. For Carter, the mother of six school-age children in a low paying job, desperation was normative existence. This was her life in Crittenden County, Ark., deep in the Delta where unfortunately one in four families lives well below the poverty level.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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