Bookmark and Share Business News in the South from The Randle Report

 

Sign up for Randle Report Daily Emails for all The South's Business and Political News Follow Randle Report on Facebook for Business News in the South Follow Randle Report on Twitter for all The South's Business and Political News

 

 
5
Likes

Here's How Prepared Each State Is For A Natural Disaster
The folks at Foodstorage.com have put together some crucial data about how safe we all are in one big and wonderful infographic. The first graphic below shows a map of the United States and the disasters most likely to hit certain parts of the country. Foodstorage.com also poured through the data to look at how each state is prepared for disaster. This is measured by each state's disaster budget per capita according to NEMAweb.org. Business Insider
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

-16
Likes

The South Is Now Almost a Democrat-Free Zone
Sen. Mary Landrieu’s loss Saturday night in Louisiana’s run-off election not only allowed Republicans to increase the size of their majority in the Senate but also moved the GOP closer to taking complete control of a region that once voted almost exclusively for Democrats. Mrs. Landrieu’s loss to Rep. Bill Cassidy (R., La.) means Republicans will control both of Louisiana’s U.S. Senate seats, its legislature, governor’s mansion, and all but one of its six House seats. That’s a far cry from most of the 20th century, when the state’s voters sent an entirely Democratic delegation to Washington for decades at a time. Wall Street Journal
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

15
Likes

Nashville photographer’s dreamy snaps expose hidden truths in the Deep South
“Southern Route,” a series of photographs by Tamara Reynolds, offers glimpses into the lives of people in the Deep South, as if she’s capturing something out of the side of her eye. Women sipping coffee at a diner, for example, or a man getting out of his truck. Reynolds said she does not look for those moments as much as she responds to them. “I just put myself in the position, and by going to these places, and I try to stay out of having too much of a plan because I will miss any opportunity,” the Tennessee photographer told Art Beat, saying she uses these chances to illustrate social structure in the South. PBS.org
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

4
Likes

Reclassifying Broadband: Big Win for Rural KY?
FRANKFORT, Ky. - "A big win for rural communities." That's how the National Rural Assembly views President Obama's endorsement of treating broadband service like telephone service. Edyael Casaperalta coordinates a national coalition of groups that advocate for those who live in rural areas. She says Obama's call for the Federal Communications Commission to reclassify broadband as a Title II service under the Telecommunications Act not only protects an open Internet but ... "Also begins a conversation about how do we bring high-speed, affordable, quality Internet to rural areas because that is what we have done before with telephone," Casaperalta says. Publicnewsservice.org
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

2
Likes

Birmingham Mayor William Bell, area leaders heading to Germany for economic development mission
BIRMINGHAM, Alabama -- When Mayor William Bell attended the Farnborough International Airshow near London in July, he said he returned with a greater understanding of the aerospace industry and leads that could bring international flights to the Birmingham airport. AL.com
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

0
Likes

Calhoun Community College breaks ground on $34 million expansion of Huntsville campus
HUNTSVILLE, Alabama -- It was standing room only at Calhoun Community College's Huntsville campus Friday morning as more than 550 people turned out to celebrate the groundbreaking on the school's $34 million expansion project. AL.com
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

0
Likes

FCC broadband reclassification will cost consumers
The latest bad idea from the net neutrality crowd, President Obama included, is that the FCC should reclassify broadband services, wired and perhaps even wireless, as telecommunications services under the Federal Communications Act. Such a move would grant the Commission much greater authority over the operations of the broadband companies, most famously Verizon and Comcast. Zdnet.com
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

4
Likes

Fuel is cheaper—so let's hike gas tax: Former governor
Consumers may be enjoying extra money in their pockets thanks to lower gas prices, but former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell suggests they shouldn't get used to it. CNBC
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

0
Likes

FTC pressed to get involved in net neutrality
Dozens of academics are asking the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to raise its voice in the fight over new net neutrality rules. A letter signed by 32 scholars on Monday was sent to the FTC urging the regulator to prevent the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from writing utility-style rules for Internet service providers, which they say could end up hurting consumers. The Hill
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

0
Likes

What Really Happens When You Cut Taxes On Oil Companies (Updated)
Tax cuts are often spoken of as an unalloyed good in American politics. But the state of Alaska is learning the hard way those cuts — especially when they are for taxes on oil companies — don’t always deliver as promised. Think Progress
Submitted 2 years 105 days ago

 

 

 

Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

http://www.tvaed.com
Southern Business & Development Southern Auto Corridor Small Town South Randle Report

Copyright ©2017 Randle Report
All of the South's Business and Political News in One Place
Login