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Job growth in Florida due to economy, not Gov. Scott
QUESTION: Tell your thoughts on Gov. Rick Scott’s job-creation efforts. He promised to create 700,000 jobs in seven years. Fishkind: Since the governor took office in January 2011 Florida’s economy has generated 827,500 new jobs, which would seem to say we’re way above the governor’s promise. The question is though, are these jobs the result of Gov. Scott’s policies or would they have been created anyway? Fishkind: That’s exactly what the question is. Are these 827,500 new jobs that would not have occurred but for the governor’s policy? And the way to figure that out is to first look at the U.S. economy; we’ll set that as a baseline: We’ll say that Florida should have at least as done as well as the nation as a whole. Florida Today
Submitted 15 hours ago

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Jeff: Innovation changing world, and Mississippi
When Steve Jobs famously recruited John Sculley from Pepsi to Apple, Jobs is reported to have asked Sculley, "Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?" Clarion-Ledger
Submitted 20 hours ago

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Deepwater Horizon Five Years Later — Restoring the Mississippi coast starts with a strong foundation
Five years ago, on April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded, killing 11 men and kicking off the worst man-made environmental disaster in U.S. history. When the well was finally capped 87 days later, the oil had already done unprecedented damage to Gulf of Mexico waters, wildlife, and fisheries, as well as the livelihoods and businesses that depend on a healthy Gulf Coast. In the wake of the tragedy, leaders at the national, state, regional, and local levels – from President Obama to Gulf governors to town mayors – promised not to rest until coastal resources were restored, tourism and seafood industries were flourishing, and communities were protected from future disasters. MSbusiness.com
Submitted 3 days ago

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Florida vs. California in 2015
My buddy, a former Floridian, lives in Long Beach, California, and last Sunday he had just finished mowing his lawn when he telephoned to catch up. Because of the much-publicized devastating drought there, the days of his green lawn — and mowing I would guess — soon could be numbered. The city is offering him a $2,000 stipend to replace his grass lawn with rock and drought-resistant plants like lemonade berry evergreens, deer grass and probably a cactus or two. Floridatoday.com
Submitted 6 days ago

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Alabama's civic challenge: Turn neighborliness into public action
This week, the David Mathews Center for Civic Life, University of Alabama's New College, Auburn University's College of Liberal Arts, and the National Conference on Citizenship are releasing the 2015 Alabama Civic Health Index. Three key indicators are explored in the Alabama Civic Health Index: political action, social connectedness, and public work. AL.com
Submitted 7 days ago

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Bigotry imposes a high cost on the U.S. economy
It seems like every day there’s a new battle being fought over discrimination in the U.S. There was the Ellen Pao trial and its claims of sexual bias at Silicon Valley’s leading venture capital firm, the continuing revelations of endemic racial discrimination in Ferguson, Missouri, and the so-called religious freedom law in Indiana that many believe is a thinly veiled cover for anti-gay discrimination. If racial and gender discrimination were purely matters of fairness, ending them would still be a worthy cause. But there is another reason to combat discrimination – it boosts the economy. The basic reason is misallocation of resources. In an economy functioning at tip-top efficiency, people do the job that they’re most efficient at doing, relative to other jobs they could be doing, and relative to other people in the economy. That’s called the principle of comparative advantage, and it dates back at least to the famous 19th century economist David Ricardo. Notice that nowhere does the principle of comparative advantage leave room for race or gender. These things, in and of themselves, are simply not important for economic efficiency – the only thing that matters is how well people can perform their jobs. Thenewstribune.com
Submitted 10 days ago

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How Tiger Killed Tiger
Augusta, Ga.-- Just in time for the Masters, Tiger Woods appears in a new Nike commercial this week. It portrays Rory McIlroy as a boy, watching Woods on television, idolizing him, emulating him and finally, teeing off alongside him. But as Woods returns from a two-month break, the scary thing isn’t that the 25-year-old McIlroy has gone from fawning over him to outplaying him. It’s that the same spot easily could have featured any one of a dozen or so golfers around McIlroy’s age. In his quest to win another major, Woods faces myriad potential obstacles, among them self-doubt, a reconfigured swing and a balky back. But even if he overcomes all that, his ascent back to the top of the leaderboard will be steeper because of the cadre of aspiring clones he spawned. The Wall Street Journal
Submitted 12 days ago

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It’s Not the Inequality; It’s the Immobility
Income inequality and economic immobility are often lumped together, but they shouldn’t be. Consider the two concepts positively: Income equality is about bridging the gap between the rich and the poor, while economic mobility is about elevating the poor as rapidly as possible. Finding ways to increase economic mobility should be our greater concern. For instance, while we have talked incessantly about the disproportionate gains of the top 1 percent, the wage slowdown in the United States in recent decades is a bigger problem for most people. Since 1973, for workers as a whole, wages have stagnated largely because of a severe productivity slowdown. New York Times
Submitted 13 days ago

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Expert: US economy still strong despite jobs report
Even though the latest nonfarm payroll numbers disappointed investors, the U.S. economy remains strong, JPMorgan Funds' David Kelly said Monday. "I don't think the U.S. economy is [too] fragile. First of all, we should not overreact to one miss on the employment report. This is an estimate of the seasonably-adjusted change in a magnitude of 140 million. To miss by over 100,000, that does happen from time to time," he told CNBC's "Squawk on the Street." "We weren't growing at about 300,000 jobs per month, but I don't think we're growing at about 100,000, either." CNBC
Submitted 14 days ago

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5 reasons the U.S. economy isn’t catching fire
WASHINGTON — Steady hiring is supposed to fire up economic growth. Cheap gasoline is supposed to power consumer spending. Falling unemployment is supposed to boost wages. Low mortgage rates are supposed to spur home buying. America’s economic might is supposed to benefit its workers. Yet all those common assumptions about how an economy thrives appear to have broken down during the first three months of 2015. The economic benefits that normally would flow after a full year of solid hiring have yet to emerge. Just 126,000 jobs were added in March, the government said Friday. Average weekly paychecks fell. Dallas Morning News
Submitted 14 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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