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Money has made Americans sick of politics. What we can do about it.
Americans are sick of politics. Only 13 percent approve of the job Congress is doing, a near record low. The President’s approval ratings are also in the basement. A large portion of the public doesn’t even bother voting. Only 57.5 percent of eligible voters cast their ballots in the 2012 presidential election. Put simply, most Americans feel powerless, and assume the political game is fixed. So why bother? Christian Science Monitor
Submitted 9 hours ago

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Rick Perry is a terrible governor. But his indictment is a politically motivated farce.
Rick Perry, the Republican governor of Texas, is one of the more odious figures in American public life. His record as a governor has been abysmal. The fact that he actively supported the execution of an almost certainly innocent man under his watch says a great deal about him as both a person and a public official, none of it good. His well-funded campaign for the Republican presidential nomination in 2012 also revealed a farcically in-over-his head figure, unable to perform even the simple task of reciting rote talking points. The Week
Submitted 2 days ago

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George Will: Progressives as economic innocents
Barack Obama, presiding over an unusually dismal post-recession economy, might make matters worse with a distracting crusade against the minor and sensible business practice called "inversion," more about which anon. So, consider his credentials as an economic thinker. gcion.com
Submitted 2 days ago

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‘Unpatriotic’ corporations and moronic politicians
Barack Obama, presiding over an unusually dismal post-recession economy, might make matters worse with a distracting crusade against the minor and sensible business practice called “inversion,” more about which anon. So, consider his credentials as an economic thinker. NY Post
Submitted 2 days ago

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Rick Perry: Even David Axelrod Thinks Indictment Is 'Sketchy'
WASHINGTON (AP) — Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Sunday defended the veto that led a grand jury to indict him on two felony counts of abuse of power, noting that even some Democrats have questioned the move by prosecutors. "I stood up for the rule of law in the state of Texas, and if I had to do it again I would make exactly the same decision," Perry, a potential candidate for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, said. Huffington Post
Submitted 3 days ago

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The Most Blah Governors In The United States
How many governors can you name off the top of your head? There are probably fewer than 10 that most politically plugged-in people can rattle off — Walker, Cuomo, Christie and Perry, for example — and then a second tier of people you hear about occasionally — Hickenlooper and Martinez types — but eventually you get to a level where most people have absolutely no idea who these governors are. Fivethirtyeight.com
Submitted 5 days ago

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The Truth About Obama’s High-Speed Rail Program
The New York Times has declared President Barack Obama’s high-speed rail program a failure. “Despite the administration spending nearly $11 billion since 2009 to develop faster passenger trains, the projects have gone mostly nowhere,” America’s paper of record reported Aug. 6—in its news pages, not its opinion section. The story quickly rocketed into Republican talking points and conservative op-eds as fresh evidence of presidential haplessness. TIME
Submitted 6 days ago

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Why Can't the United States Build a High-Speed Rail System?
Virtually every wealthy nation in the world has invested in a high-speed rail network—with the striking exception of the United States. From Japan to France, even from Turkey to Russia, trains travel through the country at speeds of 150 miles per hour or above, linking city centers and providing a desirable alternative to both air and automobile travel. Meanwhile, outside Amtrak's 28 miles of 150-m.p.h. track in rural Massachusetts and Rhode Island, the American rail network is largely limited to speeds of 110 m.p.h. or less. There are few reasons to think the situation will change much in the coming decades. So why has the United States failed to fund and construct high-speed rail? Citylab.com
Submitted 6 days ago

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The case for high-speed rail
California's high-speed rail project has become mired in controversy, red tape, and endless debate, as people hotly argue for and against one of the most ambitious railway projects in recent United States history. The $68 billion project, projected for completion by 2028, would span from L.A. to San Francisco — and many points in between. Those for it point to the economic and social benefits of sound public transit systems, the obvious potential gains in improving U.S. rail infrastructure, and the appeal of a transit system that could allow for incredibly fast travel times between San Francisco, Sacramento, Los Angeles, and other points in California. Those against bringing modern tech into California's public transit future are often primarily concerned about cost: Is high-speed rail worth the price tag? The Week
Submitted 6 days ago

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America's factories are crumbling — is the economy next?
According to a report from the investment bank Morgan Stanley, the average age of industrial equipment is now almost 10.5 years old. That's the oldest it has been since 1938 — at the very height of the Great Depression. This is a byproduct of the fact that since 2007, nonresidential capital expenditure — in other words, spending on equipment, nonresidential buildings like factories, and intellectual property — has fallen short of the long-term trend by 15 percent per year. The Week
Submitted 8 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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