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The Economy Is Not Doomed
The 2016 election might seem like a death knell for liberals who dream that the United States might eventually come to resemble one of Europe’s social democracies. The Republican Party now controls the White House, both houses of Congress, and the majority of governorships and state legislatures. But America’s youngest cohort of voters remains an underrated force for leftist economics. Burdened by student debt and the rising cost of housing and health care, this younger generation embraces a larger role for government. If, in a decade or two, today’s young liberal revolutionaries become the mainstream force in U.S. politics, Trump will have been a nativist paroxysm that merely delayed the inevitable evolution toward American social democracy. The Atlantic
Submitted 17 hours ago

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Can President Trump bring back manufacturing jobs?
When Donald Trump announced a campaign stop in Erie, Pennsylvania in August, it seemed like an unusual move. The blue-collar community on the shores of Lake Erie had not voted for a Republican presidential candidate since Ronald Reagan in 1984. For decades, labor unions endorsed Democratic candidates and their members voted in step. But the landscape in Erie was changing. Well-paying manufacturing jobs that once sustained families in the region were disappearing. Residents were leaving in search of better economic prospects. PBS.org
Submitted 17 hours ago

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Here's the real problem with Trump's America-first manufacturing plan
In 1994, when I was 13, my dad got our family's first cell phone. It was one of those brick-sized Motorolas, and it was incredibly expensive, even by today's standards. Making a call on that phone also cost a fortune—I learned that the hard way when I made a long-distance call to a girl and was sentenced by my dad to three months of hard labor as punishment. Now, more than twenty years later, I use an iPhone (which is still cheap compared to my dad's Motorola) to video chat with Pierre, my friend and client from Belgium. CNBC
Submitted 18 hours ago

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Dear President Trump: Those jobs aren’t coming back, and why would we want them to?
Dear Mr. President, Those jobs aren’t coming back, and why would we want them to? There are so many better jobs going begging… Mr. President, we followed your campaign closely (who didn’t?), especially the part about bringing jobs back. We know by this you mostly implied assembly line factory workers — traditional rust belt manufacturing. But those jobs have shriveled away. Venturebeat.com
Submitted 18 hours ago

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Job insecurity may be what pushes people toward extremism
“Will I lose my job in the near future?” For most people this is an unpleasant scenario to ponder, and for many it is a real and pressing concern. Since the financial crisis, more than half of all jobs created in the European Union have been through temporary contracts. Business Insider
Submitted 18 hours ago

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Marijuana Industry Projected To Create More Jobs Than Manufacturing By 2020
Jobs. That is what the marijuana industry hopes will keep the Trump administration from cracking down on cannabis companies. A new report from New Frontier data projects that by 2020, the legal cannabis market will create more than a quarter of a million jobs. This is more than the expected jobs from manufacturing, utilities or even government jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The BLS says that by 2024 manufacturing jobs are expected to decline by 814,000, utilities will lose 47,000 jobs and government jobs will decline by 383,000. This dovetails with data that suggests the fastest growing industries are all healthcare related. Forbes
Submitted 20 hours ago

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Coal Is Just Too Damn Expensive
President Trump is ready to start signing executive orders that roll back Obama-era regulations on climate and water pollution: While both directives will take time to implement, they will send an unmistakable signal that the new administration is determined to promote fossil-fuel production....One executive order — which the Trump administration will couch as reducing U.S. dependence on other countries for energy — will instruct the Environmental Protection Agency to begin rewriting the 2015 regulation that limits greenhouse-gas emissions from existing electric utilities. It also instructs the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to lift a moratorium on federal coal leasing. ....Trump, who signed legislation last week that nullified a recent regulation prohibiting surface-mining operations from dumping waste in nearby waterways, said he was eager to support coal miners who had backed his presidential bid. “The miners are a big deal,” he said Thursday. “I’ve had support from some of these folks right from the very beginning, and I won’t forget it.” Will this put miners back to work? Not really, for a simple reason: bituminous coal is only barely competitive anymore with natural gas:1 Mother Jones
Submitted 20 hours ago

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Can President Trump keep his promises to coal country?
From 2011 to 2015, the coal mining industry lost more than 26,000 jobs, with 87 percent of those losses coming in the Appalachian region, according to the Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration. In the last two years alone, several major coal companies filed for bankruptcy protection, including Peabody Energy, Arch Coal and Alpha Natural Resources. Which is one of the reasons why Hall and many other miners saw the election of Donald Trump as a moment of hope. PBS.org
Submitted 20 hours ago

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New EPA Chief Scott Pruitt is right: We can be “pro-energy and jobs and pro-environment”
In his first speech as EPA administrator, Scott Pruitt made it clear that the environment and the economy shouldn’t be at odds. “I believe we as an agency and we as a nation can be both pro-energy and jobs and pro-environment,” Pruitt told EPA staffers and media in Washington on Tuesday. “We don’t need to choose between the two.” Across America, clean energy businesses and workers couldn’t agree more. Hopefully Administrator Pruitt and President Trump will keep them in mind as they plot the new future of the EPA and America’s energy future. Huffington Post
Submitted 20 hours ago

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Texas Should Get Its Head in the New Solar Market Game
What would a world powered by clean, low-water energy look like? If you visit Israel’s southern region, you don’t have to imagine. In 2011, Arava Power in the southern Israeli desert launched a 4.9 MW solar field (enough to power more than 3,000 U.S. homes). Since then nearly 200 times as much capacity – both fields and rooftops – has been installed in the region. By 2025, it’s likely solar will provide 100 percent of daytime electricity, plus excess, along the border with Jordan. Edf.org
Submitted 21 hours ago

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Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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