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Louisiana politics may never be the same
As the weather turns across Louisiana, our oaks shedding dead leaves and azaleas blooming pink, it’s difficult to ignore what is also a long-term seasonal shift in the political landscape. It has been a lengthy transition that prognosticators have been forecasting for some time, but the sense that it officially begins now is overwhelming — that feeling that the next seven months in Louisiana politics will collectively become a watershed moment for the coming generation of voters and politicians. The Advertiser
Submitted 1 hour ago

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The Private Sector’s Fix for the Public Sector
Agencies struggling with poor morale turned to private-sector business leaders for advice on how to better engage their workforce, during a White House meeting on Friday. Representatives from the Housing and Urban Development and Education departments attended the President’s Management Advisory Board meeting, looking for answers from current and former leaders of Fortune 500 companies. The Fiscal Times
Submitted yesterday

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Louisiana universities, industry need to cooperate to foster innovation, report says
Important work and discoveries occurring in Louisiana universities should not remain in laboratories or scholarly journals, but transferred to the marketplace, a Public Affairs Research Council report said Monday. In its report -- Innovation in Louisiana: Maximizing Investment in University Research to Promote a Knowledge-Based Economy - PAR provides a list of recommendation for the state's universities to find ways to create a better culture of innovation. NOLA.com
Submitted yesterday

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Why only capitalism can save the planet
To say the world has changed a lot in the last century is a huge understatement. Industrial, medical and social progress has resulted in unprecedented growth in the world’s population and economy, and that growth has placed tremendous burdens on the planet’s resources. These burdens create problems — perhaps the most substantive problems we have faced as a species: from water scarcity and pollution to climate change, reliable access to nourishing food and affordable energy. Greenbiz.com
Submitted 2 days ago

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Is housing the answer to the riddle of inequality?
Here’s a striking figure: from 2012 to 2014, housing prices rose 13 times faster than wages. That's the word from a new study by RealtyTrac, which looked at 184 metro areas around the country. One hundred and forty of those metro areas — with a combined population of 176 million — saw housing outpace wages. And 45 of them — for a combined population of 63 million — saw median home prices spike past 28 percent of median income for monthly mortgage payments. That's the threshold beyond which housing is traditionally considered unaffordable. The Week
Submitted 4 days ago

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Manufacturing renaissance lost
Are happy days here again for American manufacturing? Optimists say yes: High global shipping costs, rising Chinese wages and a domestic shale gas boom are bringing appliance manufacturing back to Kentucky, creating automotive jobs in Tennessee and South Carolina, and leading an American competitive resurgence in a broad swath of industries. Thetandd.com
Submitted 5 days ago

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Mornings in Blue America
Two impossible things happened to the U.S. economy over the course of the past year — or at least they were supposed to be impossible, according to the ideology that dominates half our political spectrum. First, remember how Obamacare was supposed to be a gigantic job killer? Well, in the first year of the Affordable Care Act’s full implementation, the U.S. economy as a whole added 3.3 million jobs — the biggest gain since the 1990s. Second, half a million of those jobs were added in California, which has taken the lead in job creation away from Texas. New York Times
Submitted 5 days ago

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Former NOLA school leader: Georgia did right thing
Paul Vallas served as superintendent of the Louisiana Recovery School District from 2007-2011. He is now a consultant with DSI Education, headquartered in Chicago. The Louisiana district is the model for the Opportunity School District proposed by Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal. Deal’s plan won the approval of the Georgia House today. Atlanta Journal Constitution
Submitted 6 days ago

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This isn’t an opportunity for Georgia; this is a last chance
Watching Georgia legislators debate the state’s transportation future, as they did last week on the Senate floor, is enough to make a man despair. You look at the scale of the challenge that we face as a result of decades of willful neglect and underinvestment, and then you see the cramped vision, distorted priorities and shortage of courage on display by those elected to lead us, and honestly — you really do have to question the state’s future economic viability. This isn’t an opportunity that we’re in danger of missing; given history, this is looking more like a last-ditch chance that we just don’t have the gumption to seize. Even the best-case scenarios of what legislators may be willing to pass fall short of what is needed to keep the state and metro region competitive, let alone make up for the failures of the past. Atlanta Journal Constitution
Submitted 6 days ago

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Guest commentary: Lets save Louisiana money by revamping its criminal justice system
Many ideas have been floated to fill Louisiana’s pending $1.6 billion budget gap. One suggestion, unraised but that should be obvious, is revamping our criminal justice system. The United States leads the world with its incarceration rate while Louisiana has the highest rate in the U.S. We lock up a greater percentage of our own than anywhere else, at sentences more than four times longer than the national average. We’re not any safer for it. There’s a better way that will save money year after year, enhance public safety, and perhaps reduce some of the drastic cuts we face. Theneworleansadvocate.com
Submitted 6 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Just look around at what's happening in the aerospace industry in the American South. Aerospace is really making a move to become one of the region's top two industry sectors. It’s not there yet, but if large project counts are any indication, aerospace may soon challenge the petrochemicals sector as the second largest industry in the region. Never before has the aerospace industry been so important to the South's economy. Oh, what's the No. 1 industry sector in the South? Automotive is, of course. That industry hasn't been challenged much for 25 years in this region, or since we’ve been counting.

 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
This is our annual "Made in the South" issue and it's timely because there is a new player in the South's manufacturing universe. For almost two decades, economic developers and politicos in the South and the U.S. have been chasing Chinese projects with little or nothing to show. Want proof we've been chasing ghosts in China for years? Okay, go ahead and name a Chinese brand that's made in the South? Tick. . .tick. . .tick. Give up?
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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