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Reagan thought taxing the poor was a bad idea. Alabama should too
Alabamians below the federal poverty line should not pay income taxes. In spite of the fact that almost twenty percent of Alabama's population falls below the poverty level, Alabama taxes the poor more aggressively than any state in the nation. We shouldn't do that to the poor among us, and it doesn't even make sense as a matter of public policy. AL.com
Submitted yesterday

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Our View: Is N.C. serious about luring manufacturing?
The other Carolina thumped us again. This time it's a Volvo plant, which will sit just outside Charleston, not far from the Boeing plant that North Carolina also tried to win but couldn't. This state's leaders insist that they want projects like these, which bring billions of dollars in capital investment and thousands of good-paying jobs. But they're not willing to pay the price - which in the case of Volvo was more than $200 million in state and local incentives, including $120 million in state-issued economic-development bonds. North Carolina's offer wasn't even close. If we want to compete with our neighbor, we've got to start playing the game. Fayobserver.com
Submitted yesterday

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Alabama: Where we hate the federal government but sure do need them
First things first this Monday morning. It's Memorial Day, a time set aside to honor those who paid the ultimate sacrifice for their country and our freedoms. We should all honor their sacrifices today. Memorial Day has also become a time to honor those who currently serve in our military. If you are one of those people, or their family member, or a veteran, thank you. AL.com
Submitted yesterday

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Analysis: Economist links faltering middle class to lack of new businesses
WASHINGTON — At the start of the 1970s, about 3 percent of U.S. households started a business every year. By the end of the '80s, that rate had increased by a third. By the end of the '90s, it had risen again, by almost a fifth, and stood near 5 percent. Then, abruptly, the growth stalled — and after the Great Recession, the rate fell. If the trends of the previous 30 years had continued, the nation would have seen 1 million more entrepreneurs over the past decade than it actually did. For some reason, it did not. Tampa Bay Times
Submitted 5 days ago

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American Dream? Or Mirage?
ECONOMIC inequality in the United States is at its highest level since the 1930s, yet most Americans remain relatively unconcerned with the issue. Why? New York Times
Submitted 5 days ago

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Tennessee jobs depend on the Export-Import Bank
Tennessee’s economy remains weak. While unemployment fell slightly to 6.3 percent in April, our state’s jobless rate remains far above the nation as a whole. And things could soon get worse. The Tennessean
Submitted 5 days ago

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Former Duke CEO criticizes N.C. legislature for 'moving into the past' on energy policy
Former Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers came down hard Thursday on the N.C. General Assembly for proposals that could gut the state’s solar and renewable-energy industry. In his keynote speech at the annual Energy Inc. Conference in Charlotte, Rogers said lawmakers “are moving not into the future, but into the past.” “I say shame on us for not being focused on the technology of the 21st century. Shame on us for turning our backs on this industry growing here,” he told the crowd of about 420 attendees at The Westin Charlotte. ”Shame on us for letting the legislature move in that direction.” Triangle Business Journal
Submitted 6 days ago

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America's well-being can't count on corporations
The U.S. economy is picking up steam but most Americans aren’t feeling it. By contrast, most European economies are still in bad shape, but most Europeans are doing relatively well. What’s behind this? Two big facts. Christian Science Monitor
Submitted 6 days ago

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Why Americans are so nostalgic about the manufacturing industry
The fate of American manufacturing is back in the headlines, thanks to the bipartisan slugfest going on over the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the massive trade deal that has become a source of conflict between President Obama and Democrats in Congress. On Monday, Matt Yglesias did his Matt Yglesias thing, and pointed out that, contrary to a lot of narratives about the decline of U.S. manufacturing, the sector's production is actually at an all-time high. It may have declined as a share of the country's overall economic production, but that's just because other sectors like health care and education have gotten bigger in comparison — not because manufacturing has shrunk. The Week
Submitted 7 days ago

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Why Incentives for Big Volvo Deal Make Sense
The $204 million incentive package that state and local governments offered Volvo to make a huge investment for at least 2,000 jobs in Berkeley County masks a pesky public policy debate that few talk about in public: Are incentives a good deal? Should they exist at all? On one hand, we wouldn’t have landed BMW, Boeing or Volvo without incentives. That’s just the reality of economic development. Because of incentives, these companies hired a lot of people and served as a catalyst to generate thousands of other in-state jobs — everything from suppliers to fast-food workers to staff restaurants that serve them. Furthermore, incentives make sense, many argue, because they will eventually be paid off through steady infusions of revenue from sales, income and property taxes from the thousands of workers who get new jobs. It will just take a little time — and it’s in the government’s interest to invest now to get a long-term return on investment. Free-times.com
Submitted 7 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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