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What Hillary Clinton can learn from Florida
As Hillary makes her way to Fort Lauderdale today, for her first non-fundraiser event in Florida since relaunching her campaign, the truth remains that hardworking Floridians are ready for a change from the failed Democrat polices of the last six years. Hillary deserves recognition for finally attending an event that is open to the general public, but unfortunately her participation comes on the heels of two federal inspector generals recommending that the Department of Justice review the mishandling of government documents in connection with her use of a personal email. While her visit to Florida is a great opportunity to address recent controversies, the more likely scenario is that she will stick to her stump speech of why she is the right candidate to lead our nation. Sun-Sentinel
Submitted 4 hours ago

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Guest opinion: South Carolina shines light for others to follow on solar power
Our legislature, Gov. Nikki Haley, South Carolina Electric & Gas and Duke Energy have put South Carolina on the leading edge on solar power. While other states dither and fight, South Carolina is taking the lead. Across the United States, more solar was installed in 2014 than in any other year ever -- 30 percent more than was installed in 2013. Island Packet
Submitted yesterday

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Hey, Democrats: Stop freaking out about the 'gig economy'
Think about the big economic challenges facing America. The share of adults with any kind of job tumbled during the Great Recession and has barely recovered. Productivity growth — the basic driver of rising living standards — has been stagnant for a decade. Then there's the ginormous national debt, $18 trillion and counting. (Just to name a few.) But where in America's perceived panoply of economic problems does the "gig economy" rank? The Week
Submitted 3 days ago

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How the federal gas tax exemplifies problems in Congress
The roads and bridges on America's interstates certainly aren't getting any better, but little is being done to fix the issue on a national level. President Obama has made attempts for the last two years to offer solutions, but with both being based on adjusting corporate taxes, neither made much headway. The lingering option has always been to finally raise the federal gas tax, which finances the US Highway Trust Fund, but that tax has been stuck at 18.4 cents a gallon since 1993. In an incredibly deep dive into the problem, ProPublica has published a fantastic read about the past, present, and possible future of paying for infrastructure. Autoblog.com
Submitted 4 days ago

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The New Civil War
You can be forgiven if you thought that the fight over the Confederate battle flag had subsided when the stars and bars fluttered down outside the South Carolina statehouse for the final time earlier this month. The odious symbol of both the Confederacy and Jim Crow retiring in the very state where the Civil War began – and doing so under the leadership of a Republican governor – might lead some to think that it is finally on a course for the dustbin of history. And it might well be, but not before the U.S. Congress takes another whack at the fight. Call it the new Civil War, same as the old culture war. Indeed, between the flag debate and percolating fights over the permissibility of firing people because of their sexuality or even their (unmarried) heterosexual activities, the Congress seems intent on continuing the culture war fights. US News & World Report
Submitted 4 days ago

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The South's democracy crisis
In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2013 Shelby County v. Holder decision weakening the Voting Rights Act, states including North Carolina and Texas passed onerous laws making it more difficult to vote, especially for people of color. While strict new voter identification requirements have gotten a lot of attention, other factors limit access to the ballot — and a new report finds access is especially restricted in the South. Southern Studies
Submitted 9 days ago

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Movement: Charleston Is Not Sandy Hook
In Charleston, we were reminded that racist vigilante attacks against black people are a part of this country’s legacy. This a legacy built on violence through the subjugation and criminalization of black communities and terrorism to incite fear. Rather than addressing that legacy, the response to the Charleston massacre almost immediately focused on concern for stronger gun regulations. Instead of the identification of Dylann Roof as a racist with a white-supremacist ideology, we’ve heard remarks from even the president about the need for stronger gun regulations and mental-health care (as if racism were a mental illness). Less attention was paid to cracking down on white racist vigilantes and stemming the rise of right-wing racist hate groups. The Nation
Submitted 13 days ago

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Will South Carolina become a leader of the new South?
On Friday, the Confederate battle flag came down on the South Carolina Statehouse grounds. This symbolic, long overdue gesture has significant meaning. The flag celebrated the sedition, slavery and secession of the Civil War. When Robert E. Lee surrendered, that flag was furled. It was raised over the statehouse in 1961 to celebrate segregation, suppression and states’ rights. Previous efforts to remove it failed. Former Gov. David Beasley called for it to come down, and probably lost his re-election as a result. Even after the triumph of the Civil Rights Movement, South Carolina burnished this symbol of racial division. Newpittsburghcourieronline.com
Submitted 15 days ago

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Editorial: Incentives should create jobs
For better or worse, Spotsylvania officials and residents are learning how the world works these days when it comes to deciding how the county will develop. These are tough lessons that involve deciding what kind of businesses and jobs the county should encourage and if taxpayers should pay to attract them. Fredricksburg.com
Submitted 15 days ago

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Trump, hatred and the economy
Trump, hatred and the economy I hope The Donald has to cancel his appearance in this state, because if he makes a speech here he'll probably inspire more anti-Hispanic hatred. He's the No. 1 Republican candidate, because most Republicans hate for any Hispanics to be living in this country, despite the circumstances. It's like, for many Arkies, the war against Mexico didn't really end in the 1800s. Arktimes.com
Submitted 15 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

Urban areas have all kinds of assets that are easy to spot. They have the population, so the labor shed is not usually an issue. Urban areas are also connected by better roads, rail and air service and many have river and deep water ports. Usually Internet access and other forms of communication are more efficient in urban areas. And you have a larger array of quality of life options to choose from, such as the cultural assets found in metropolitan areas.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
After I finished the cover story for this issue, I read an interesting article by economist Paul Krugman, the op-ed columnist for the New York Times, titled, "Partying like it’s 1995." Generally I side with Krugman, even though I am a journalist, not an economist. Occasionally, though, I read some of his stuff and ask myself, "What planet did Krugman come from?" Like when he predicted a shift of automotive assembly to Canada after Toyota announced a new plant in Woodstock, Ontario in 2005 because of "free healthcare," among other benefits. That Toyota deal was the last major automotive assembly plant announced in Canada and I predict it will be the very last one for the Canadians.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean
If you have ever seen one of my presentations, then you know about the word "reshoring" and how that phenomenon has lifted the spirits of even the most skeptical Southerners regarding the future of the region's economy. After all, in the last four decades, manufacturing has suffered a bloodletting never before seen in U.S. history. The biggest factor behind the slow and long meltdown that began in the 1990s was the herd mentality to offshore manufacturing capacity to cheaper locales, primarily by U.S.-owned companies.
 


 

 

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