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Are Suburbs All They’re Cracked Up to Be?
I was struck by something the mayor of Cincinnati said recently in a conversation on the Urbanophile blog, published by one of our Governing columnists, Aaron Renn. The mayor, John Cranley, essentially proclaimed that the time has come for cities to stop dreaming of regional solutions to urban problems, to stop thinking that they would be better off if they could annex the suburban territory that lies just outside their borders. Cincinnati, he said, can get along just fine without any more than the roughly 80 square miles and 300,000 people that it currently comprises. At this point in the 21st century, Cranley argued, taking on suburban territory simply gives cities new problems that they don’t need. Governing.com
Submitted 10 hours ago

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What to Do About the Jobs-Growth Conundrum
A strange thing is happening in the U.S. labor market: The unemployment rate has been falling much faster this year than it should given the slow underlying pace of economic growth. In fact, the fall in joblessness has exceeded that projected by policy makers and private-sector economists, the majority of whom had expected much faster economic growth. It's a conundrum that policy makers can't allow themselves to dismiss too easily or too quickly. Bloomberg
Submitted 12 hours ago

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Atlanta needs a design director
People are flocking back to Atlanta and construction cranes are returning. Developers are scrambling to break ground on various parking lots and vacant land in Midtown. Along the Atlanta Beltline, developers are eager to build next to the Eastside Trail and the project's future phases. There have been successes when it comes to design and architecture, including Ponce City Market, but the long list of ho-hum design in our fair city is getting longer. It's hard to imagine these designs — take your pick of the glass-and-steel vertical subdivisions dotting the skyline or in the development pipeline — standing the test of time. clatl.com
Submitted yesterday

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Blue Collar Dreams: Will the Decline of Manufacturing Jobs Damage Social Mobility?
The United States is falling short on two fronts: the generation of upward social mobility and the generation of quality manufacturing jobs. Are they connected? Certainly many of the progressives gathered at Netroots Nation—a progressive political action conference—in Detroit, think so. The state of the middle-class worker was the focus of numerous panels. In the past, the weakening of labor unions would have been the main topic. This year, wage stagnation, income inequality, jobs gaps, investment, and worker respect and dignity had the spotlight. Brookings Institution
Submitted yesterday

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Which Is Worse - Government or Corporate Bureaucracy?
Libertarians have been saying for a long, long time that if we just get rid of government, everything will run a whole lot better. But if you get rid of government, corporations step in to fill the gap left by government. And the truth is, corporate bureaucracy, the kind of bureaucracy people have to deal with every day when they try to do something as simple as pay their credit card bill is just as bad - or even worse - than any government bureaucracy. Truth-Out
Submitted 4 days ago

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Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley considers taxes (sort of), and sounds like a grown up: opinion
Bless Gov. Robert Bentley. He sounded like an adult this week. An adult in Alabama politics. Finally. Sure it came after he dispatched a feeble challenge in the Republican primary, virtually assuring himself – no offense to Democratic challenger Parker Griffith –another term in office. AL.com
Submitted 4 days ago

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Is outsourcing killing us?
The U.S. is experiencing a different kind of “reshoring.” China, the world’s largest air polluter, is sending us via the jet stream a fair amount of their harmful emissions. And, according to a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, much of it is our own fault. Machinedesigns.com
Submitted 5 days ago

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The Labor Force Won’t Fix Itself
The recent decline in the U.S. labor force won’t reverse on its own, but government policies could make a difference. That’s the major takeaway from a new report from the president’s Council of Economic Advisers, which the White House released Thursday morning in conjunction with a speech by CEA Chairman Jason Furman at the Brookings Institution. Fivethirtyeight.com
Submitted 5 days ago

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Florida and Georgia’s commonality: Lousy governors
Florida and Georgia are rivals on a sizable scale. The annual football game between UF and the University of Georgia in Jacksonville can resemble preparations for a large war between two enemies, but it seems that the two rivals have more in common than we think. Both states have incumbent governors that need to go. The lack of ethics and alleged corruption oozing from governor’s mansions in Tallahassee and Atlanta make the two southern states top targets for Democrats this fall and for good reason. Alligator.org
Submitted 5 days ago

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The Job Market Is Broken (and That's a Good Thing)
It's well known that the spoils of this economic recovery have benefited those at the very top. Corporate profits are at record highs. The stock market is racing toward the moon. Household net worth is moving higher by leaps and bounds. The Fiscal Times
Submitted 8 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

In growth, companies find themselves in the dilemma of identifying capital to increase capacity and managing opportunity cost where capital may be deferred. This dilemma is amplified as capacity constraints drive a company to complete the site selection process for an expanding or new facility. 
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Dr. Glen Fenter
Desperation sometimes masks itself in acceptance. Such was the case for Takelia Carter of Marion, Ark. For Carter, the mother of six school-age children in a low paying job, desperation was normative existence. This was her life in Crittenden County, Ark., deep in the Delta where unfortunately one in four families lives well below the poverty level.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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