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What happened to vocational training in schools – and can it come back?
Re-introducing vocational training in high schools could benefit students in countless ways, from preparing them for skilled, lucrative careers to giving them practical skills that make them feel useful. There was a time when every child in the United States was taught more than just academics, when woodworking, welding, and cooking were part of the school curriculum. That changed more than 60 years ago, when the United States overhauled its education system to introduce tracking – the separation of academic and non-academic streams of students based on their perceived potential for college. Treehugger.com
Submitted 14 hours ago

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Study says wind turbines, solar farms could spike energy prices, cause job losses
North Carolina’s renewable energy mandate will cause a spike in electric bills and the loss of more than 43,000 jobs by the end of the decade, a new study contends. Dozens of solar energy projects with thousands of panels glistening by the roadsides have been constructed in northeastern North Carolina in counties such as Pasquotank and Currituck. A 22,000-acre wind turbine farm – the largest in the southeastern United States – is under construction west of Elizabeth City. The Virginian-Pilot
Submitted 15 hours ago

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Housing bubble? Experts say no
Home price escalation. Hot housing market. Soaring home sales. Sound familiar? That was the scene before the last recession when the housing bubble popped and sent the nation’s economy into a downward spiral. Post-Courier
Submitted 17 hours ago

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Editorial: By fixing what isn't broken, N.C. has lost its economic development edge
Some may sugar coat it with a concoction of cherry-picked statistics and soft-boiled anecdotes, but the reality is that North Carolina’s economic performance these days is bland, flat and lackluster. The once-shining leader in the tech sector, education advancement and entrepreneurial energy is viewed as tarnished and dull. Wral.com
Submitted 19 hours ago

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How States, Cities And Universities Can Retain Foreign Entrepreneurs
American colleges and universities attract and educate some of the world’s most talented and ambitious foreign graduate students. But thanks to restrictive immigration laws, many of these brilliant, highly-trained individuals are forced to head straight to the nearest airport upon graduation. They take a lot more than their suitcases home with them. They take the valuable skills, talents, and ideas incubated by America’s graduate programs. What’s worse, the innovations and businesses, which would have created good American jobs, materialize instead on foreign shores. Huffington Post
Submitted 5 days ago

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We’re About to Live in a World of Economic Hunger Games
Most of the people who’ll tell you unions are dead are business types. Andy Stern, former head of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), is the rare labor organizer who says the same thing. TIME
Submitted 5 days ago

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SAMUELSON: Is job instability in America overstated?
WASHINGTON — If economic commentators (including me) seem to agree on one thing, it is this: Jobs in America have become less secure. If you’ve got an OK job, don’t let go, because you may not be able to find another. The conventional wisdom is widely shared — but it may be wrong. App.com
Submitted 5 days ago

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Editorial: Revival of $272-million CSX hub will boost eastern N.C. economy
The timeline could be a tale of miraculous resurrection. In fact, the announced revival Tuesday of the once-left-for-dead CSX transportation hub in eastern North Carolina, was about determination and the work of skilled, tried-true economic development professionals. The Carolina Connector project announced by Gov. Pat McCrory, which appears to have strong local support, will be located near Rocky Mount. Wral.com
Submitted 5 days ago

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$65 Million Reasons to Stop Roadblocking City-Driven Job Creation
In the last year, city officials in New Orleans, Cleveland and Nashville have found themselves scrambling to protect “hire local” policies from their respective state governments. In all three cases, racially diverse cities struggling with high rates of poverty and unemployment sought to stimulate the local economy with provisions that focused on creating job opportunities for disadvantaged residents. And in all three cases, state senators representing wealthier, predominantly white districts sought to preempt city policies to protect business interests. Nextcity.org
Submitted 5 days ago

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What did Brexit tell us about regional economic development policy?
In the aftermath of the EU Referendum commentators have put forward a range of reasons as to why the country voted the way it did. Economic disenfranchisement, which has persisted since the 1970s, either directly or indirectly, appears to have had something to do with the discontent people have shown with political institutions. And countless policy efforts over this period have failed to sufficiently address this. Those cities that polled a larger number of leave votes tend to have lower-skilled economies. And, as the chart below shows, this applies for both services and manufacturing. Citymetric.com
Submitted 6 days ago

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Features & Opinion

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

For those who still languish over "losing to China" or believe that the economy is still in recession, wake up and smell the data. Economic development in the South was about as good as it gets in calendar year 2015 according to the data. And as for China, borrowing a quote from the late football coach Bear Bryant that he made in the half-time locker room down 15-0 to Georgia Tech in 1960, "We got 'em right where we want 'em." For those of you who don't know the rich history of Alabama Crimson Tide football, Bama scored all of its 16 points in the fourth quarter, kicking a field goal on the last play of the game to beat Tech 16-15.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Mike Randle
Today, factories in the U.S. make twice as much product as they did in 1984. And they are doing it with one-third of the manufacturing workforce. In fact, the output of durable goods in 2015 was the highest in the nation's history. So, we do have a strong manufacturing base, at least in the South, much of the Midwest and parts of the West, and it is getting stronger because on a cost-basis, we can compete with any major manufacturing nation in the world.  
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

FEATURE     
The argument for or against a minimum wage hike continues between the reds and the blues, as well as within the economic development community in the South. Should we stay the course with a minimum wage under $8 an hour to better compete with Mexico, the South's biggest competitor for jobs, or set a minimum wage just over $10 an hour, a wage floor most centrists support? That $10 per hour is, according to the MIT Living Wage Calculator, about right in most states in the South for one adult to be able to cover basic expenses plus all relevant taxes.
 
 Randle Report - Business News in the South
Recent data from the Computing Technology Industry Association (Comp TIA) showed that the technology industry is one of the fastest growing job generators in the South and the nation. The report also indicated that technology job compensation is growing faster than any other sector.
 


 

 

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