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VW union could signal change for Tennessee labor fight
Eric DeLacy takes pride in his job in the paint shop at Volkswagen's Chattanooga plant. But after nearly four years on the job, DeLacy says he also wants to have a bigger say in how the plant runs, and thinks a labor union could provide that voice. He is among more than 700 workers who have joined a new local union started in March by the United Auto Workers. "I want to work with management in the plant to be a force to improve the life of the workers in the plant and the UAW is the best way to achieve that," he said. DeLacy is among a growing, but still relatively small, share of Tennesseans belonging to labor unions. The Tennessean
Submitted 9 hours ago

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Business, industry leaders worry EPA ozone emission changes will cost Louisiana billions in stifled economic growth
Members of the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry are concerned potential changes to ozone emission standards will end the economic boom the state is soon to experience in the manufacturing industry. LABI and the National Association of Manufacturers published a study that shows potential severe consequences to the state's economy if the Environmental Protection Agency lowers their ozone emission standards from 75 parts per billion to 60 parts per billion. According to the report, a drop in emission standards would cost the state $189 billion in total compliance costs and $53 billion in gross product loss from 2017 to 2040. "The indications for the economy are nothing short of disastrous for Louisiana," said Jim Patterson, LABI's vice president of Government Relations and director of environmental quality council. NOLA.com
Submitted 9 hours ago

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Tenn. Gov. Bill Haslam's Medicaid Talk Draws GOP Criticism
NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's suggestion this week that he may soon submit a proposal for Medicaid expansion in Tennessee received some blowback from a fellow Republican leader in the Legislature on Friday. Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, R-Collierville, issued a statement to question the Republican governor's suggestion that a proposal could crafted by this fall. "It seems the governor is not very serious about whatever he has in mind regarding Medicaid expansion, because he hasn't conferred with the General Assembly," Norris said. Memphis Daily News
Submitted 10 hours ago

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Machinists union faces uphill climb to organize Boeing South Carolina
Unions represent less than 5 percent of the workforce in South Carolina, a state with entrenched anti-union sentiment. Setting up shop at Boeing Co. in North Charleston would be a landmark achievement for collective bargaining interests as the biggest, most high-profile win for union activity in the Palmetto State. Organized labor representatives know it won't be easy. "Clearly, South Carolina has made a name for itself as the anti-union destination," said Frank Larkin, spokesman for the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers. Not mincing words, Republican Gov. Nikki Haley has made herself a leader of anti-union sentiment in South Carolina, saying they are unwelcome, unneeded "job killers." Post and Courier
Submitted 10 hours ago

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Why One West Virginia Town Has Banned Cell Phones
August 30, 2014 Only four hours west of Washington, there is a town where cell phones and wireless Internet are outlawed. Commercial radios are banned, and microwaves aren't welcome either. Green Bank might sound like a Luddite's dreamscape, but the West Virginia hamlet's self-imposed blackout is being done all in the name of science: Green Bank is home to the world's largest radio telescope, a 100-meters-in-diameter dish that is the crown jewel of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. By measuring radio waves emitted from objects in space, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope can go where optical telescopes can't. It lets scientists "see" parts of the universe that are invisible to the human eye, giving them the power to study far-off galaxies and the lives of stars and discover new planets. The National Journal
Submitted 10 hours ago

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New path helps union to regain its footing
The United Auto Workers just announced that General Motors will move production of the next-generation Cadillac SRX crossover SUV from Mexico to its UAW assembly plant in Spring Hill Tennessee. Yep – that is the same Tennessee where anti-union Republican officials threatened in February to pull economic development funds from Volkswagen if workers voted to join the UAW at their Chattanooga plant. journalgazette.net
Submitted 12 hours ago

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VIDEO: POLITICO Playback


Politico
Submitted 13 hours ago

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VW union could signal change for Tennessee labor fight
Eric DeLacy takes pride in his job in the paint shop at Volkswagen's Chattanooga plant. But after nearly four years on the job, DeLacy says he also wants to have a bigger say in how the plant runs, and thinks a labor union could provide that voice. He is among more than 700 workers who have joined a new local union started in March by the United Auto Workers. The Tennessean
Submitted 13 hours ago

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Judge Halts Enforcement of New Louisiana Abortion Law
Louisiana's new antiabortion law can take effect Monday as scheduled, but provisions requiring doctors to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals cannot be enforced against clinics and doctors who filed suit, a federal judge ruled Sunday night. U.S. District Judge John W. deGravelles, a recent Obama appointee who sits in Baton Rouge, granted a temporary restraining order against state officials after three of Louisiana's five abortion-performing clinics sued. Governing.com
Submitted 13 hours ago

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Facing Climate Change, Cities Embrace Resiliency
The flash floods that have long plagued Dubuque, Iowa, seem to be getting worse. Although the city lies on the Mississippi River, the biggest threat of a deluge is from the sky. Summer storms are being stoked by increasingly warmer air. As a result, they carry more moisture and soak the low-lying areas and hills that ring the city. The water speeds downhill toward the Bee Branch Creek, a partially buried waterway that flows beneath several neighborhoods before emptying into the Mississippi. Often, the storms dump so much rain that the creek’s concrete channels cannot contain the runoff. Water spills over streets, across backyards and into basements. It can push open manhole covers, spray out from fire hydrants and carry away parked cars. Governing.com
Submitted 13 hours ago

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Features & Opinion

 Top Ten Places in the South for Relocating California Companies

The America South is home to almost as many residents as the Northeast and the Midwest combined, but even that statistical record is about to be broken. According to a new Census Bureau study that came out in April, 51 percent of the nation's population jump occurred in the South from 2010 to 2013.
 

 Randle Report - Business News in the South

 FEATURE  
By Stacy Randle
Demographer Wendell Cox recently analyzed the largest gains in holders of bachelor's and post-graduate degrees between 2007 and 2012 in the 51 metro regions in the U.S. of 1 million residents or more. The results were published in Forbes magazine and the South dominated the ranking.
 

 Business News in the South - Randle Report

FEATURE     
By Mike Randle
There are numerous factors driving the new industrial revolution in the South. And it is a revolution, as this manufacturing surge that began in 2007 continues to break records year after year in the total number of large, capital intensive projects. One factor, of course, is that reshoring of facilities back to the U.S. continues to grow each year.
 
 Nashville Mayour Karl Dean

We try to change up the categories in our annual Ten Top 10s section, but we always include the "Ten People Who Made a Difference" category. This year though, we are honoring 12 and you will learn why by reading about this group of folks who have made a difference in the South. Here is our annual list that includes executives, economic developers and politicians who have made a difference in the South's economy.


 


 

 

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